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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb. 27, 2008
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    Default When is a rider no longer a beginner?

    I am just curios. I would assume they should be able to WTC on their own and know leads and diagonals?

    Just wondering what everyone else thinks!
    Thanks!
    *Paige*
    ~*It's not about the ribbons, but about the ride behind it"
    R.I.P. Teddy O'Connor



  2. #2
    Join Date
    May. 3, 2006
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    Default

    I'm thinking that just knowing leads and diagonals is within the domain of a novice



  3. #3
    Join Date
    May. 29, 2006
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    California
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    Default

    Any good coach will make me feel like a beginner any day!



  4. #4
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    Feb. 27, 2008
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    Default

    Oh more clarification, I meant to ask when do they move up to "intermediate rider" status? Sorry
    *Paige*
    ~*It's not about the ribbons, but about the ride behind it"
    R.I.P. Teddy O'Connor



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec. 27, 2006
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    319

    Default

    They should at least be able to accomplish a training level dressage test, be able to put a horse reasonably straight on a straight line, ride turns and corners, take a horse down a line of trot poles to a cross rail and canter away, without being told how to do it, it won't be stellar, but they won't look like an accident waiting to happen. Then as an intermediate rider, they can polish the skills they have, and become able to tackle more complicated maneuvers under the aid of a coach. They won't be able to ride tricky horses, they will be on a 'schoolmaster'. They won't know how to really keep a horse between the leg and hand, their transitions will be rudamentory. They should definately be able to tell which diagonal they are on, and change, and they should be able to tell which lead they are on. They won't be able to shorten and length stride yet.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan. 16, 2002
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    West Coast of Michigan
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    Default

    It's sort of like art--a definition is tough, but I know it when I see it. If you're looking for a strict definition, you won't find one. It' s subjective.

    A beginner is still struggling with their balance at all gaits, lacks an independent seat and hands, prone to mistakes but has the basics (leads, diagonals) down and is competent enough to get and keep a reasonably well-schooled and willing horse in the correct gaits and pace.

    After a rider is able to competently handle horses that are a little less willing or well-schooled, can sit the trot reasonably well, handle his/herself over terrain or at the gallop, sit out a silly spook or buck without coming unglued, is pretty much 100% on leads/diagonals (and can usually get these by "feel" instead of having to look) and you trust them to ride a greener horse without worrying about them, they're no longer beginners. Roughly.
    Click here before you buy.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul. 10, 2001
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    6,704

    Default

    To me, an intermediate rider is one who has overcome the basic balance challeges and is capable of pushing the boudaries of their ability.

    The beginning rider is one who is simply trying to get all their parts to work together coherently.



  8. #8
    mosngodo Guest

    Default

    I know it when I see it. If you're looking for a strict definition, you won't find one. It' s subjective.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan. 5, 2006
    Location
    Atlanta
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    5,053



  10. #10
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    Jan. 18, 2008
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    Alberta, Canada and South Australia
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    Default

    CookiePony: interesting chart that you posted.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb. 1, 2008
    Location
    Nowhere, Maryland
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    Default

    If you're familiar with the pony club ratings scale, I'd put it somewhere between D3/ C1. Able to WTC/ hop over small fences/ ride comfortably in the open/ cope with a horse that is a little green or goofy/ tack and untack and groom and deal with minor wounds and know when to call the vet for bigger stuff.



  12. #12
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    Sep. 13, 2002
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    Azle, Teh-has
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by CookiePony View Post
    Totally awesome. Never seen that before.
    Thanks Cookie!
    http://kaboomeventing.com/
    http://kaboomeventing.blogspot.com/
    Horses are amazing athletes and make no mistake -- they are the stars of the show!



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan. 31, 2007
    Location
    where its cold
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    834

    Default

    I read along time ago (so it's been rewritten in my mind)

    Beginner - unable to deal w/ the minor unpredictable activity from a horse w/out losing balance, etc

    Intermediate - momentary loss of balance from an unpredicted movement (trip), shy

    Advanced - can deal w/ a spook or trip as if nothing really happened and just carries on...

    Just a simple definition...



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Apr. 4, 2004
    Location
    Durham, NC USA
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    127

    Default

    I have always found it hard to define the difference and EVERYONE has their own opinion. When I am looking at horses to buy or lease, I always ask what their definition of beginner or intermediate is, because its VERY subjective.

    We designed a scale of Ib, B1, B2, B3 then I1, I2, I3

    Completion of our B3 level is walk/trot/canter without stirrups. Jumping a single obstacle at 2'6". And learning about flexion and acceptance (basic training level 1 test)

    Completion of our I1 is walk/trot/canter without stirrips in all positions (rising, sitting, 2-pt). Jumping 2'6 courses and 3" single fences. These riders also have a solid understanding of high training level, low 1st level collection and dressage movements.



  15. #15
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    Aug. 14, 2008
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    The beautiful midwest
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    Default

    I've taught for years and of course all the things mentioned are good barometers. But for me its when the student starts to become more of a rider and less of a passenger. Doesn't matter what discipline and sometimes it is not even a major event, but you know it when you see it.
    Lilykoi


    Hell hath no fury like the chestnut thoroughbred mare



  16. #16
    Houdiniboy Guest

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Lilykoi View Post
    I've taught for years and of course all the things mentioned are good barometers. But for me its when the student starts to become more of a rider and less of a passenger. Doesn't matter what discipline and sometimes it is not even a major event, but you know it when you see it.
    Very well said.



  17. #17
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    Feb. 27, 2008
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    Default

    Thank you everyone!!! All of these things helped and that chart is amazing! hah I also forgot about PC ratings!
    *Paige*
    ~*It's not about the ribbons, but about the ride behind it"
    R.I.P. Teddy O'Connor



  18. #18
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    Sep. 30, 2007
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    Default

    I read somewhere that it is after 100 falls.



  19. #19
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    Jan. 16, 2002
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    West Coast of Michigan
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    Default

    I read somewhere that it is after 100 falls.
    Jeez! I've fallen off like 15 times total in my life--guess maybe I'll be ready to post the trot by the time I'm 70.
    Click here before you buy.



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Dec. 20, 2009
    Posts
    20

    Default

    I love that Woffard chart it's really great. Also the ncsuequine scale was cool and made sense.



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