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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr. 17, 2006
    Posts
    166

    Default Trainers what ge did you stop riding or stop riding problem horses?

    After riding a problem horse yesterday, a question keeps coming up from witnesses, family members, and friends. And that is are you getrting to old for this?

    I was wondering at what age that others have stopped riding the tough ones?

    I am approaching 50, like really really close, but I still enjoy the challenge of young and green horses. But I have noticed the geological change lately, the ground is harder. (I don't come off alot)

    Just looking for information.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    May. 3, 2006
    Posts
    11,568

    Default

    46 when I stopped riding problem ones.

    Still riding green ones.

    Not so much a matter of age. More a case of having no blood clotting factor meaning I had to give things serious consideration.

    Most of the work I do with horses (including horrors) is under long reins. I still do that and I like to get the horse going well there before anyone ever sits on it.
    Last edited by Thomas_1; Dec. 20, 2009 at 04:48 AM.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep. 1, 2004
    Location
    north of Atlanta GA
    Posts
    3,721

    Default

    I'm 48 and am a bit more cautious about what I'll ride. I used to get on anything but now I'm not ashamed to say no thanks, get someone else. The ground is a lot harder now and injuries take longer to heal.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov. 2, 2001
    Location
    In Trouble with Dad...
    Posts
    29,997

    Default

    I suppose once you start contemplating your own mortality it's time to reevaluate your choice of mounts. I am not sure if it has a lot to do with age tho.
    Quote Originally Posted by Mozart View Post
    Personally, I think the moderate use of shock collars in training humans should be allowed.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    May. 9, 2007
    Posts
    435

    Default

    Like the poster, i'm pushing fifty (mainly away!) I let my 16 yr old assistant back most of the horses first (unless they are really really sweet). I don't like re-starting messed up horses anymore; I've found it easier and safer to start my own.
    I call it good risk management.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov. 9, 2005
    Location
    uk
    Posts
    15,265

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SEP View Post
    After riding a problem horse yesterday, a question keeps coming up from witnesses, family members, and friends. And that is are you getrting to old for this?

    I was wondering at what age that others have stopped riding the tough ones?

    I am approaching 50, like really really close, but I still enjoy the challenge of young and green horses. But I have noticed the geological change lately, the ground is harder. (I don't come off alot)

    Just looking for information.
    i havent and i am 54



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug. 14, 2005
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    2,245

    Default

    Ask yourself if you can afford to be out of work for 6 weeks or more if you get injured. If you have enough money squirrelled away and if your clients will stick with you if you aren't there for that long. If you can't, I'd skip the crazy ones. You can still fall and get hurt on a good one, but why increase your risk.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar. 19, 2002
    Posts
    104

    Default

    I'm 54 too, still breaking babies....but a PROBLEM horse, that's different....would seriously think about it



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2003
    Location
    NorthEast
    Posts
    24,362

    Default

    I still like problem horses...although I'm only 40 now. But the real basket cases I'd start turning down.
    It's mostly a reality thing for me...when I was young I was the "first up" on all the worst ones. (I think our BO ans coaches were trying to thin out us younger riders, LOL) But now although I'm not afraid of the actual coming off/getting flung as I am afraid of the "What happens to everything if I'm laid up????" *That* thought makes me all:
    Who's going to take care of the barn, the horses, the rest of the animals, the house, the snow plowing or fence repair or seeding or pot hole filling or tractor maintenance or even the errands or cooking or billion other things I do???? Ack!
    You jump in the saddle,
    Hold onto the bridle!
    Jump in the line!
    ...Belefonte



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct. 2, 2007
    Location
    Beyond the pale.
    Posts
    2,957

    Default

    I am nearly 53 and have just given up riding the problems this year. I am not afraid of the buckers, balkers, stoppers, rearers, etc.

    But I slipped in the mud earlier this year, tore all the major ligaments in my knee. The knee is OK- no pain-I can walk fine and my muscles are strong enough to keep it aligned during ordinary activity... but doing an emergency dismount from a horse, I discovered that knee no longer has any lateral stability- jumping down and landing on 2 legs made the joint dislocate, again, and that is pretty damn painful when it happens. An hour later, I can ride again, but I cannot jump off with abandon like I used to...
    "The Threat of Internet Ignorance: ... we are witnessing the rise of an age of equestrian disinformation, one where a trusting public can graze on nonsense packaged to look like fact."-LRG-AF



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan. 31, 2003
    Posts
    18,472

    Default

    I am 42 and I won't ride the nutjobs anymore.

    Now.. define nutjob. I think that most horses, if you ride them forward and then actually LET THEM GO won't do whatever nasty stunt they have been doing. So far it's been a 99% successful strategy. 1% of them still toss me

    I never rode horses who truly reared and I still won't. A horse w/a bucking problem.. I will IF I can take the horse in full training. I no longer will get on someone's problem for one ride, I know that I cannot fix it that quickly.. and am more likely to get hurt if I have not had time to do ground work and get to know the horse (and vice versa). It's just really not productive in the long run to put in that single ride. I also have less tolerance for those really spoiled rotten horses.. I used to think I could retrain *their owners* but I know now that I cannot the horses are the easy ones...

    So I guess other than that, I really haven't changed all that much. I still like to get on babies and I love green horses. I love the big lightbulb moments for them. Perfecting a half pass is not nearly as exciting as the first time they reach on to the end of the rein and go "Oohhhhhhh that is nice, I like it!"
    "Kindness is free" ~ Eurofoal
    ---
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jun. 4, 2002
    Location
    Suffolk, VA
    Posts
    16,684

    Default

    I'm 46 and I am starting babies mostly now. I love working with the youngsters and don't think of them as difficult at all if you take your time and put in the groundwork...on the contrary most youngsters are clean slates and very easy. I do not take on 30 day wonders and refuse to rush if it's someone else's horse.

    No, I have no interest in riding badly spoiled and dangerous horses. I never have liked that and the last few years I've totally lost my taste for thrill seeking. My hats off to those that do though.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Oct. 26, 2007
    Location
    San Jose, Ca
    Posts
    4,571

    Default

    ok, I am not "old" yet, and not a real pro, but I used to ride and work with a lot of "problem" horses. I was paid for my time, but not enough to leave my 9 - 5, so I could not afford to get really injured!

    I turned down two.. one was a saddlebred who liked to rear and go over backward.. nope, NOT worth it! I passed that one down the line.

    The other, a 18+ hand percheron who was just SPOILED. I had success on her back, but the day she tried to cow kick me while tacking up (almost getting my head!!!) I packed up my stuff right then and there! Just so not worth it. Called the owner and said sorry, but I don't want to get killed by this horse. I didn't create the monster, and I wasn't going to lose my health or life over it!

    I love love love starting the babies, and find them much "safer" then a really spoiled horse.
    Last edited by Appsolute; Dec. 19, 2009 at 12:35 PM.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Sep. 4, 2006
    Location
    Somewhere in the Southwest
    Posts
    1,186

    Default

    I'm only 25, so take it for what it's worth. I start plenty of babies, though somewhat more cautiously than before. I will not, however, get on any known crazy horses. I ride plenty of hot/sensitive/etc, but horses that are known to buck/rear/bolt/etc, forget about it. It's not worth it. I can't get insurance, and we sure as hell can't afford major medical bills.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Sep. 1, 2009
    Posts
    221

    Default

    I had to quit, for the most part, several years ago. I'm on the far side of 50. I don't do problem horses at all. Haven't been on a youngster in quite a while. I would rather start them myself as I like to know what has happened to them as opposed to trying to straighten them out after they're scr*wed up. It's easier if you start them.

    As long as Aleve, or similar product is made, I'm good to go for a good, long time.
    1.20.2013



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