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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec. 22, 2008
    Location
    Eugene OR
    Posts
    63

    Default Tell me about Black Walnut Trees and Horses

    I am hoping to fence in my backyard when I bring my mare home from college. I mentioned that on the edge of the area that I hope to put her has at least one black walnut tree in it to a friend, her response was that black walnut trees are poisonous to horses.
    I tried doing some research on this topic, but I haven't been able to come up with much. (I must not be looking in the right places)

    There is at least one black walnut tree along the perceived fence line, but I believe there is another in the area too, close enough that leaves etc could blow into the pasture.

    I do not know if I would be able to remove said tree(s), since it is my parents property.

    How poisonous are black walnut trees to horses? What part(s) are poisonous? Suggestions? Thanks a bunch.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar. 12, 2008
    Posts
    276

    Default

    I have heard that, too.

    If I remember correctly, several years ago William Woods University rec'd a load of shavings that was contaminated with black walnut. Several horse got sick and I believe they may have lost a couple of them.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct. 18, 2000
    Posts
    22,379

    Default

    Don't cut it down and you'll be fine.

    The substance is called juglone; and it is in Black Walnut and Butternut trees.

    Livestock have grazed around and under them for hundreds of years.

    It is the fresh sawdust that is the problem. Leave the tree intact and it will provide shade for your horse.

    Hope that helps.

    I googled some info on Black Walnut and Butternut for you (not sure if you have Butternut out there -they look similar)

    http://www.wvu.edu/~Agexten/hortcult/fruits/blkwalnt.htm

    http://www.gardenguides.com/taxonomy...glans-cinerea/



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr. 7, 2007
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    3,035

    Default

    Black walnut trees are highly toxic to horses. I had an acquaintance that almost lost a horse because the pine shavings she had bought had black walnut shavings mixed in. Caused SEVERE rotation of the horses feet. She may have had to put the horse to sleep, I'm not sure.

    There's plenty on the internet. Google 'black walnut toxicity horses' and you'll find plenty.

    If you cut the trees, you have to remove all shavings from the area. Your best bet is to fence off the tree. I have several black walnut trees in my pastures. They aren't fenced off but I have gone out and picked up the walnuts. Not real positive, but it's the oil that does the damage, so I'm thinking stepping on enough walnuts would contain enough oil to do damage. If you've ever handled them you know the outer cover of the nut is very oily and leaves a horrible residue.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov. 1, 2005
    Location
    Pendleton, SC
    Posts
    310

    Default

    Black Walnut trees are not toxic. Black Walnut tree shavings are highly toxic. As long as you don't cut the tree down or trim it back in anyway it should not be a problem. If you do need to trim it back due to a broken branch or the likes you have to keep the horses away from any shavings that get on the ground. Took one that died out of a friends pasture a couple of years ago and moved all cut branches away from pasture, then raked all the shavings into a small pile and burned them as well as the ground where they had fallen, watered down well and did not let the horses back in that pasture until there weere a couple of good soaking rains.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec. 22, 2008
    Location
    Eugene OR
    Posts
    63

    Default

    Thank you all.

    Where the tree is would be in what I'd eventually turn into my ring or riding area. I would be able to fence the area around the tree off. And clean up all of the nuts and tree branches that are sure to fall.

    Are there any other nut trees or other trees that I should be aware of?

    Unfortunately my parents place is across the country from where my horse and I are.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec. 14, 2007
    Location
    Wilsonville, Ontario, CANADA
    Posts
    4,246

    Default

    We have HUNDREDS and I actually mean THOUSANDS of BW trees all over our property and many if not all of them border my hay fields and pastures and sacrifice turnout paddocks

    I dont worry at all about the nuts, other than a) they are a total PITA and b) a horse might step on one and bruise a sole. I dont worry about the branches dropping in or getting mixed with a bale of hay as those branches were dead anyhow

    We have cut many many of them down surrounding the paddocks and hay fields and are just very careful about cleaning up the area well

    I have boarded at places in the past with BW trees and it totally freaked me out in the beginning as well, but I have now made peace with the fact that dozens and dozens of horses passed through those properties on a yearly basis and none were ever affected by the BW trees. Not at all, even one iota ...

    And 3 years later, not one of my horses has ever come close to foundering or being affected either and in many cases, the BW trees are like 8-10 feet away and the nuts and branches are dropping right into their paddocks

    Try to keep the branches trimmed and try and do it in the fall when the toxins are going back down to root level for the winter and you should be fine as well ...



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov. 4, 2003
    Location
    Dallas, Georgia
    Posts
    16,356

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by TrueColours View Post
    We have HUNDREDS and I actually mean THOUSANDS of BW trees all over our property and many if not all of them border my hay fields and pastures and sacrifice turnout paddocks

    I dont worry at all about the nuts, other than a) they are a total PITA and b) a horse might step on one and bruise a sole. I dont worry about the branches dropping in or getting mixed with a bale of hay as those branches were dead anyhow

    We have cut many many of them down surrounding the paddocks and hay fields and are just very careful about cleaning up the area well

    I have boarded at places in the past with BW trees and it totally freaked me out in the beginning as well, but I have now made peace with the fact that dozens and dozens of horses passed through those properties on a yearly basis and none were ever affected by the BW trees. Not at all, even one iota ...

    And 3 years later, not one of my horses has ever come close to foundering or being affected either and in many cases, the BW trees are like 8-10 feet away and the nuts and branches are dropping right into their paddocks

    Try to keep the branches trimmed and try and do it in the fall when the toxins are going back down to root level for the winter and you should be fine as well ...
    Yeah, what she said!

    We have 8 BW trees in the middle pasture where we board. Aside from the Walking On Giant Marbles PAIN IN THE BUTT when the trees drop said black walnut hulls , they're just trees to us and the horses.

    Don't not to worry
    <>< Sorrow Looks Back. Worry Looks Around. Faith Looks Up! -- "When they try to tell you these are your Golden years, don't believe 'em.... It's rust."



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun. 15, 2002
    Posts
    5,908

    Default

    Had one at one of the barns I boarded at, and it was fine! It was near parking lot so mostly the nuts fell in there. I remember one time my horse was impatiently waiting while I was talking to the vet and he decided to try to eat a nut. I removed it before he even got it beyond his front teeth, but didn't have an ill effects from getting a BW nut in his mouth!



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec. 14, 2007
    Location
    Wilsonville, Ontario, CANADA
    Posts
    4,246

    Default

    I removed it before he even got it beyond his front teeth, but didn't have an ill effects from getting a BW nut in his mouth!
    He wouldnt either. The worst he might do is choke on it if it wedged in his throat!!!

    The toxins arent in the nuts - they are most concentrated in the roots ...



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep. 7, 2009
    Location
    Lexington, KY
    Posts
    15,439

    Default

    There are many landscape trees and bushes that are poisonous to horses. Two of the worst are red maples and wild cherry leaves when they are wilted. I would remove both if you think the leaves could end up in a pasture during a storm. Another is yew bushes. Be very careful when trimming; make sure you remove all cut branches. Lots more, but to my mind, in my area, they are the worst.

    Several good books out there about plants poisonous to horses, as well as lots of info on the internet. Just google it.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb. 16, 2003
    Location
    MI USA
    Posts
    6,945

    Default

    Have to disagree on this point. Jugalone is in ALL parts of the BW tree, leaves, nuts, roots, bark and wood. Master Gardener class covered that because not removing leaves can sour the ground for gardens later. DO NOT put BW or Butternut leaves in the compost pile for the garden, Jugalone remains and sours the compst.

    Reading the above posts of happy owners, it does SOUND like the horses have PLENTY of room to move around their BW trees. Having room to eat elsewhere, LOTS of food all the time, keeps the bored horses away from plants and trees that are not good for them.

    The hungry, bored with no grazing, horse in small paddock, is who will be chewing on BW stuff. Same with having Cherry trees in the pasture, they ignore them because horse can do other stuff instead of stuffing themselves onthe dried leave, chewing the wood. Dried Cherry leaves are extremely toxic, but horses ignore them with other food available. Poison weeds also are usually ignored if horse has other food or space to go eat elsewhere.

    So you would want to look around the future paddock area, see how much else can horse graze on, move about, before the BW is a target of boredom.

    In tests, only takes about a TABLESPOON or less of BW sawdust injested, to get into bad reaction with horse and laminitus. Totally agree with reactions mentioned from BW mixed into sawdust bedding. Gets jugalone absorbed into the system thru skin and hooves.

    And SEASONAL tree chewing, should be considered. Mine don't bother trees until the fall and winter with short daylight hours, not much in grazing. Body systems seem to DEMAND woody browse, logs to gnaw on. I usually throw over safe type logs, willow, brush trimmings of honeysuckle, for just gnawing on in paddocks. I have to fence off my tree corner to keep trees alive thru winter and spring.

    Perhaps having a treeless dry lot for winter would be helpful. Parents may not like having their trees chewed and killed anyway, and BW would be out of reach thru winter times. And having a horse in a treed lot can cause a GREAT deal of damage in a VERY short time. Hooves compacting the dirt around roots is also quite harmful to the trees in wet weather.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Dec. 22, 2008
    Location
    Eugene OR
    Posts
    63

    Default

    The lot itself has about 3 trees in it. One is a persimmon. The black walnut is on what would be the fenceline, and most of the trees are on the fence line including one of the black walnuts. It was part of an old cow pasture. The second bw is on my neighbor's property. So I wouldn't be able to remove that one.

    I planned to have the area that would be closer to the bw as a ring/riding area, and only graze the horses in there during the summer.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jan. 31, 2003
    Posts
    18,472

    Default

    I know someone who has paddocks where there are black walnut tree *roots*. One of her ponies cannot be turned out there; she shows signs of toxicity pretty quickly. Maybe she chews on them, who knows. Freaky, huh?!!!
    "Kindness is free" ~ Eurofoal
    ---
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Aug. 16, 2008
    Posts
    457

    Default

    We removed several black walnut trees when we moved here because they were right next to the barn and future paddocks. I called the county extension office and they said all parts of the tree are poisonous. I wouldn't worry about them in a large pasture, though.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Apr. 2, 2008
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    1,346

    Default

    I asked my vet about my BW trees and he said to leave them alone and the horses would be fine but if I cut them down or trimmed them up I would need to keep the horses away from that area.

    I have left them alone and the horses love the shade. We pick up the nuts a few times a week and raked the leaves but thats all.

    Oak trees are much more of a problem IMO than BW trees



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Mar. 6, 2009
    Posts
    8,141

    Default

    My vet says just the shavings ~trees will not be a problem.
    Zu Zu Bailey " IT"S A WONDERFUL LIFE !"



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jan. 25, 2007
    Location
    Iowa
    Posts
    688

    Default

    For what it's worth. There have been horses around our walnut trees for over a hundred years and our oldest living family member (almost 80) has no recollection of a horse ever having a problem due to the walnut trees on this farm. Not to say that there couldn't ever be a problem but intact trees don't appear to commonly cause problems. There are other plants I would be more concerned with.

    This is from Merckvetmanual.com. It has lots of other poisonous plants.

    http://www.merckvetmanual.com/mvm/se...d=black,walnut


    Juglans nigra Black walnut


    Native to eastern USA; now from eastern seacoast, west to Michigan and most of the Midwest, south to Georgia and Texas Horses Tree with deciduous, alternate, pinnately compound leaves (numerous lanceolate leaflets with serrated margins); leaflets in middle are largest. Male and female flowers on same tree but different inflorescences. Thick husked nut does not open when ripe. Twigs have chambered pith. Juglone, phenolic derivative of naphthoquinone. Shavings with as little as 20% black walnut toxic within 24 hr of exposure. Reluctance to move; depression; increased temperature, pulse, respiration rate, abdominal sounds, digital pulse, hoof temperature; distal limb edema; lameness. Severe laminitis with continued exposure. Nonfatal; laminitis and edema of lower limbs. Remove shavings promptly. Treat for limb edema and laminitis. Improvement in 24-48 hr with no sequelae.



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Sep. 27, 2000
    Location
    Southern California - on a freeway someplace
    Posts
    9,529

    Default

    Are some horses more susceptible than others?

    My dad used to give me the shavings/sawdust that he generated from woodworking to use as bedding for my horse. He did a project with black walnut wood, we bedded the horse on the resulting sawdust/shavings and she suffered no ill effects. We didn't know about the BW toxicity at the time or obviously we wouldn't have used them. Someone told us later than some horses have a bad reaction and others don't, but I never verified this.

    I suppose it's also possible that the levels of jugalone were lower in the wood as compared to the trees so the resultant sawdust had a lower concentration.



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Dec. 14, 2007
    Location
    Wilsonville, Ontario, CANADA
    Posts
    4,246

    Default

    Peggy - the fellow (arborist) that came last year and culled trees from our woodlots on the property asked me if I wanted the limbs to make shavings for the horses - they could also rent me a chipper that would render a shaving from them

    I said "NO!!! There is going to be a lot of BW in there!" and he looked at me like I was nuts and said that he has been doing this for 20 or 30 years, and most clients with horses, opt to do so, they get a nice big free pile of shavings out of the deal and not one has ever had problems with BW mixed in there and again I said thanks but no thanks - I dont want even one SMIDGEN of BW shavings coming near my horses ...

    So maybe only SOME horses react to them and not all for some reason???



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