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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May. 26, 2005
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    1,546

    Default Hock injection down time?

    I have had hocks injected by 2 different vets - the first one says 24 hours in, 24 hours out, then you can ride. The second one says 3 days in, 3 days out then back to light work for 3 days. Out of curiousity, what do your vets say?



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan. 16, 2002
    Location
    West Coast of Michigan
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    Default

    I daresay it would depend a lot on the horse, the degree of problems with the joint, and whatever history there was (injury, etc.) leading to the injections.

    Bonnie just got done last week--recommendation was to leave her in the rest of the day (mostly due to the sedation), turnout the next two days (she is pretty easygoing in turnout), light ride the day after and go on from there depending on how she looks and feels. She was ridden Friday and I rode her yesterday and think she feels much better; we'll push for a little more than just easy W-T-C this coming week. Probably won't jump her for a while since this is more or less "down time" anyhow and I want front shoes back on before picking up the jumping. No hurry on my part, although the vet said it would be OK after she seems to be back to normal w/flatwork.
    Click here before you buy.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug. 31, 2004
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    VA
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    Generally I have been told you keep them in the rest of the day and that night, they go out the next two days, then you hack the next day and go back on about your business the following one. This has been the same reccomendation for all of the joints I have had injected, shoulders, coffin joints, hocks, etc. You name it. I think that necks can be different because they are more difficult to access.
    -Grace



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar. 9, 2006
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    1,096

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by skyy View Post
    I have had hocks injected by 2 different vets - the first one says 24 hours in, 24 hours out, then you can ride. The second one says 3 days in, 3 days out then back to light work for 3 days. Out of curiousity, what do your vets say?
    My vets go with 3 days in, 3 days turn out, then light work.

    Did have vets say 24 hours in, 24 hours out then work.

    But after having MY knees injected three times, I am ALL for the conservative approach of 3 days in.... I know know how it feels.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec. 13, 1999
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    Greensboro, NC
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    36,188

    Default

    My vet wants a 7 days of normal turnout, then a gradual re-introduction back to full work. By gradual, I mean a week or so, not just hopping back on full speed.

    Is there harm in doing more, sooner? I don't think so. The point of the 7 days is to allow the injected chemicals to do the part of their job that reduces inflammation. She (vet) didn't know the details, but part of what goes on is the body sort of stops making (enough of) its own HA because it's fighting inflammation. Once the inflammation is gone/down, it can return to it's regular job of actively providing protection to the joint.
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr. 21, 2006
    Location
    CA
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    842

    Default

    My first vet said the 3/3/3 deal, second said I could be back on by day two and back to work soon after. I agree that I think it depends on the severity of the reason for injecting in some cases. Personally, I tend to lean towards the more conservative amount of time. It is important, IIRC, to get them moving the day after, whether in the turnout or by handwalking. It's important to get the joint moving and working again soon after injecting, but there's a difference between that and stressing the joint. I'd get the horse walking or strolling around a turnout for a few days and then get back to work as you and your horse feel comfortable.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul. 31, 2007
    Posts
    15,742

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    Y'all might want to ask your vets:

    What he or she injected. Different steroids (typically the active ingredient in joint injections) have different half lives.

    What he or she believes about how long steriods stay in the joint and their effects on cartilage. Researchers and clinicians disagree on the extent to which steroids damage cartilage.

    In the lower joint of the hock no one cares-- it doesn't move much and would help out everyone if it would just cotton pickin' fuse already. For moving joints, it's a much bigger deal.

    Last (or first) *why* the vet recommends the schedule he or she does.
    The armchair saddler
    Politically Pro-Cat



  8. #8
    Join Date
    May. 3, 2004
    Location
    Ontario
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    976

    Default

    My vet says...
    Stall rest for 24 hours
    Calm, quiet turnout for 24 hours
    Regular turnout for 2-3 days...if he'll stay quiet
    Then a day or two of short W/T hacking
    Then light ring work
    Then back to regular work

    So...basically 7 days off 'real work

    I'd rather be safe than sorry.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun. 25, 2007
    Posts
    2,312

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mallard View Post
    My vet says...
    Stall rest for 24 hours
    Calm, quiet turnout for 24 hours
    Regular turnout for 2-3 days...if he'll stay quiet
    Then a day or two of short W/T hacking
    Then light ring work
    Then back to regular work

    So...basically 7 days off 'real work

    I'd rather be safe than sorry.
    Same as Mallard. Really no "real" or full riding for 7 days, and starting off with just a walk hack.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec. 15, 2005
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    3,755

    Default

    I don't know that there is any data to support the length of time the horse needs to be left in or how they need to resume work. I suspect each vet has a different protocol, and most of them are not evidence based. We always leave the horse in for several hours until they are fully awake. We leave the injection site wrapped to keep it clean overnight to decrease the risk of infection. The horse gets a few days off and then goes back to work gradually over a few days.

    I have no reason to believe that what we do is better than any other protocol. Years ago, we took a horse to pony club championships 2 days after he had coffin joint injections (because he was suddenly dead lame the weekend before championships). After those injections, he remained sound for about 5 years. Maybe hard work is good after injections!



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov. 8, 2006
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    2,479

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    my horse that has minimal xray changes, but "feels it" up to a 2/5 grade lame does best when he is back into full work after 48 full hrs off. We also do his pasterns on the hinds, but often not at the same time just because they are done more often than the hocks.

    He once had a front ankle and both hock injected and when turned out the next day, got spooked and rip roared around, full speed, sliding stops, spins, ect. Despite the fact it scared the hell out of me, he was fine and he did super at his prelim event 10 days later and full format one star another two week after that. He was still sounder and happier than he was before the injections. Just my experience with this one horse on this one occasion.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Nov. 10, 2005
    Location
    Va
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    3,806

    Default

    My horse lives out 24/7. My vet knows this. I usually wait at the vet clinic with her in a stall to wake up from the sedation and then I take her back to the farm and turn her out. She has 3 days off, 3 days of light work and then back to normal.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jun. 13, 2009
    Posts
    247

    Default

    when i worked with standardbreds at the track, no matter what was injected it was one day in the stall then back to jogging. basically jog or train the horse that morning, inject them, then they get the rest of that day off (which they would anyways) and the next day off too. never had any issues that i know of.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Nov. 2, 2003
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    area II
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    Default

    My vet said no turn out for 48 hours then w/t for one day then w/t/c. The reason he doesnt want them out for the 48 hours is the possibility of rolling and getting injection sites dirty



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