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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep. 23, 2004
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    Holland Twp., NJ
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    Default Thursh and soil question

    In the next sometime, my two older geldings will be moving home. Yay! Both have occasional thrush at their current home where they live out, mostly because I don't clean their feet often enough. My home farm has never been pasture or held horses or cows before. Will my horses bring the thrush to the new farm? If I were to get serious and get their feet 100% cleared up in the weeks prior to their move, will that lower the chance of their importing it home?
    Do not take anything to heart. Do not hanker after signs of progress. Founder of the Riders with Fibromyalgia clique.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec. 13, 1999
    Location
    Greensboro, NC
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    Default

    "thrush" doesn't live on the soil.

    The bacterua/fungus that causes thrush does though, just like where it is now. It's a management issue with thrush:
    - not picking feet
    - poor hoof form
    - dietary issue
    - metabolic issue
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr. 7, 2007
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    Tennessee
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JB View Post
    "thrush" doesn't live on the soil.

    The bacterua/fungus that causes thrush does though, just like where it is now. It's a management issue with thrush:
    - not picking feet
    - poor hoof form
    - dietary issue
    - metabolic issue
    Every farrier I've ever known says that thrush lives in the soil. Management issues (such as everything you list) can allow the thrush to begin eating at the hoof once it's been picked up from the soil. I guess they could all be wrong, but the last 3 farriers I've talked to said the same thing.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr. 7, 2007
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    Tennessee
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    Default

    Not that I trust an 'E-how' article, but it says the same thing

    http://www.ehow.com/how_4474008_treat-thrush-horse.html



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec. 13, 1999
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    Greensboro, NC
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    Default

    *thrush* is in the feet The bugs that cause it live in the soil
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep. 23, 2004
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    Holland Twp., NJ
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    Default

    SO if I control the thrush, and don't import the bugs that cause it to my house... can my horses still develop thrush later on?
    Do not take anything to heart. Do not hanker after signs of progress. Founder of the Riders with Fibromyalgia clique.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr. 7, 2007
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    Tennessee
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Penthilisea View Post
    SO if I control the thrush, and don't import the bugs that cause it to my house... can my horses still develop thrush later on?
    Yes. There is no way to kill the thrush bacteria in the soil and just because there have never been horses on the property doesn't mean it's not there. The best you can do is keep your horses hooves picked out and do preventative stuff (iodine or a thrush product on hooves once a week, proper trimming, proper diet, etc). Thrush bacteria is in the soil. A thrush infection is when the thrush begins to deteriorate the hoof. And even with all the preventative and keeping hooves clean, sometimes it just happens. Air kills the thrush bacteria. Keep the hooves clean and dry and thrush will have a hard time invading the structure.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec. 13, 1999
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    Default

    Just be careful about blindly doing preventive iodine or something - you don't want to hide anything that needs to change about your management

    I neglected to add something to my list of likely causes - you can pick the feet out 8 times a day, but if the horse is constantly standing in wet manure/urine, you're still likely to have a problem. I'm not saying that's the case here, just adding that to the causes of thrush
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan. 16, 2002
    Location
    West Coast of Michigan
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    Default

    There are like 90 billion different organisms that live in the soil, the large majority of which have no interest in us (or our horses' feet) whatsoever.

    Whatever the bug is/bugs are that cause thrush, they are already there in your soil, unless you're planning on moving to Mars or something. THAT would be an ecodisaster, importing all those bad hoof bugs to a sterile (maybe) planet! Otherwise, don't sweat it--it's not like you can do anything about it anyhow. Bacteria dominate this planet, always have, always will. We may think we're in charge . . .

    But why wouldn't you "get serious" with thrush just for the sake of making it go away, anyhow?
    Click here before you buy.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun. 10, 2001
    Location
    nj
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    Thumbs up relatedly,

    an article you may find interesting:

    http://clickandtrim.com/index.php?op...d=73&Itemid=79
    http://www.eponashoe.com/
    TQ(Trail Queen) \"Learn How to Ride or Move Over!!\" Clique



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