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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct. 16, 2002
    Posts
    1,771

    Question Trailer ramp cocoa mats?

    Does anyone know where to get one for a two horse trailer ramp?

    Or any other tips for a ramp that gets slippery when it`s wet?



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct. 14, 2000
    Location
    Now In the Sandhills, NC mostly
    Posts
    6,784

    Default

    you can get them online--
    http://www.northamericanmat.com/coco.html

    http://www.mats-inc.com/0407b-woven-...mats-p-50.html

    http://www.thematking.com/business_i...cocoa_mats.htm

    They are pricey, but less pricey than replacing the mats.

    In a pinch I throw sand on the ramps, but mine are slick as snot when wet, so I will walk them off the front.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan. 10, 2004
    Posts
    491

    Default

    I got mine a few years back at http://www.cocomatsnmore.com. They had the best price at the time, and shipped very quickly.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug. 22, 2001
    Location
    Almost Aiken
    Posts
    2,798

    Default

    I've done 2 different things:

    Trailer #1 - had the local fix-it place attach wooden cleats or strips across the whole ramp. I think they used 1 x 2 strapping, but in some very tough wood because they lasted a long time.

    Trailer #2 - kept a bag of sand in the front with a small scoop in it, and would liberally sand the ramp as necessary. The only problem with that is that you have to really sweep the ramp well or the grit binds up the hinge - or it did with my old trailer anyway.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct. 24, 2003
    Location
    The rolling hills of Virginia
    Posts
    5,892

    Default

    You might want to have a chat with your best local trailer repair shop. There are some wonderful new rubber products for ramps that really, really work well. But I am sure it depends on what type of ramp material you are attaching it to (wood, steel, aluminum).

    I love the coco mats but I have no idea how or if they can be sanitized. I never thought it would be a problem for me until it was. I had to take a very sick horse to the equine hospital (right into quarantine) come back and load a stallion to take for collection to a different facility. Since I didn't want to expose the stallion to the unknown disease or expose the collection facility we had to do a very fast and complete sanitation of the trailer. But it did leave the trailer soaking wet, which was fine for a relatively short trip but would have been bad for slippery ramps.

    This trailer was fairly new and has this rubber with small raised squares on the ramps. It is easy to load both on the low profile back ramp and unload through the front with a steeper side ramp. Even in the pouring rain I've had much better luck than with older rubber.

    SCFarm
    The above post is an opinion, just an opinion. If it were a real live fact it would include supporting links to websites full of people who already agreed with me.

    www.southern-cross-farm.com



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb. 16, 2003
    Location
    MI USA
    Posts
    7,501

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by saje View Post
    I've done 2 different things:

    Trailer #1 - had the local fix-it place attach wooden cleats or strips across the whole ramp. I think they used 1 x 2 strapping, but in some very tough wood because they lasted a long time.
    We also have the wood cleats on all the trailer ramps. They do prevent slipping, are ALWAYS ready to use with no EXTRA work on my part.

    Our rubber covered ramps ALSO have the cleats, because a fog or morning dew, can slick up that rubber so horse can't grip, shod or barefoot. Had one horse slide down on her knees, trying to unload on a damp rubber ramp. Went to the wood cleats after, never have any problems at all.

    Cheap, fast, safe method of making any ramp, no-slip.

    I could never figure why anyone would want to handle the coco mats if they could avoid it. Then you have to store them for hauling after horses are in or out of the trailer. Way too much work when the cleats are so easy.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct. 16, 2002
    Posts
    1,771

    Default Thanks!

    This trailer is an Exiss 2 horse. The slats idea is interesting, but can they be attached to a basically metal ramp, covered with rubber?

    I`ve had 3 horses just this summer slip and fall backing out, even when the ramp wasn`t steep, so it`s gotta get remedied.

    Also, thanks for all the tips. Is a 36 inch cocoa mat wide enough? That`s what the companies you aimed me at seem to sell?

    And, how DO those get cleaned? Just aim a hose at them?



  8. #8
    Join Date
    May. 2, 2002
    Posts
    1,312

    Default

    I've often wondered about these mats. Are they heavy? Do you through the mat in the back of your truck after you've loaded the horses so you have it when you get to you destination? Or does it go in front of the horses? Is it a 1 or 2 person job to move the mat? I am disabled and wonder if one of these mats would be a possibility for me to use on my own or if I would require a helper.

    Thanks in advance and sorry for the semi-hijack
    Beth



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov. 20, 2008
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    2,225

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    I have a Kingston 2 horse. The 3 ft mat fits perfectly when loading a horse into the trailer. Of course, you have to move it to the other side to load the second horse-but I think a wider mat may get too cumbersome.

    Hadn't thought about how to properly clean it-I roll it up and stow it up front after I load so it hasn't gotten too dirty so far. I would imagine a hose would work well for cleaning.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov. 20, 2008
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    2,225

    Default

    Invite-they aren't super heavy but they're kinda long and a bit cumbersome. I fold mine up and put it in front of the horses-that's the easiest for me. I can do it alone-they aren't heavy like rubber stall mats but you can't exactly chuck them one-handed to the front of the trailer, either.

    If you were only using one side of a 2 horse trailer, you could store it on the other side and drag it back and forth to use on the ramp. If lifting or dragging is difficult, I'm not sure if it would work for you. Sorry I can't give you a better answer-hopefully this helps.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb. 14, 2001
    Location
    Lexington, KY--GO BIG BLUE!!
    Posts
    3,324

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    OK, I have a really simple, cheap, EFFECTIVE secret solution that I discovered at my last horse show in October.

    Due to unlevel ground, I had to park and load/unload on a hill. It made my already-short ramp quite steep. It was damp, and the ramp was a little dirty. Both horses slid coming out, skinned their knees, and became (understandably) beligerent about loading. I was desperate, the horses were cranky, and the only thing I had was...

    A big, dirty towel. Like, used to be a beach towel, but has spent the last 7 years in the barn, stained, faded green stripes, worn thin and frayed. With nothing else to lose, I spread the towel out on the ramp and shuffled my feet on it... OMG. It was like I was standing on a no-slip rubber mat in a bath tub. FRICTION!! YAY!

    Horses were skeptical of my new plan, but once they had two feet on the towel ramp -- no slipping! -- they trusted me and walked right in.

    My trailer is a slant load, so the actual entrance is only about 3' wide; I lay the towel longways down the ramp, and it is just wide enough for the entrance. I do not affix it to the ramp in any way... literally just throw it down there flat. So far the towel has not ripped or torn, though really it's an old ratty barn towel and who cares if it dies, I can find another one. Easily washed and easily replaced, and absolutely does the job!!
    “A clever person solves a problem. A wise person avoids it.”
    ? Albert Einstein

    ~AJ~



  12. #12
    Join Date
    May. 2, 2002
    Posts
    1,312

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mkevent View Post
    Invite-they aren't super heavy but they're kinda long and a bit cumbersome. I fold mine up and put it in front of the horses-that's the easiest for me. I can do it alone-they aren't heavy like rubber stall mats but you can't exactly chuck them one-handed to the front of the trailer, either.

    If you were only using one side of a 2 horse trailer, you could store it on the other side and drag it back and forth to use on the ramp. If lifting or dragging is difficult, I'm not sure if it would work for you. Sorry I can't give you a better answer-hopefully this helps.
    Thanks
    Beth



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