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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep. 9, 2009
    Location
    Canada
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    253

    Default Petting vs. Patting

    My new mare loves a good rub or a scratch. New people often give her a firm pat on her neck and at the moment, she usually flinches. I've given horses pats my entire horsey life and it wasn't until I owned this new horse that I realized how much more valuable a soft stroke or a scratch is, at the very least, to this particular horse.

    Are you a petter? A patter? Does your horse get the point that they have done something right with a firm pat on their neck?



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep. 7, 2009
    Location
    Ocala
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    182

    Default

    most of the time I do pat their necks and the little hops and head shaking I take as them feeling good about what they just did. But more often then not I will squeeze their crest, going up and down their neck. I was told this is really relaxing for them (almost like a hug) because its what their mom's would do to them when they were wee little tykes.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug. 30, 2007
    Location
    Illinois, USA
    Posts
    8,308

    Default

    I pet, I pat, I scritch.. whatever!

    My mare usually knows that any of the above is a positive thing, as it's accompanied with a "Good girl!".
    Tell a Gelding. Ask a Stallion. Discuss it with a Mare... Pray if it's a Pony!



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr. 17, 2002
    Location
    between the barn and the pond
    Posts
    14,495

    Default

    rubs not pats. They love a rub. A tolerant horse won't mind a pat, but rubbing makes for friends



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb. 23, 2008
    Posts
    4,266

    Default

    I do more rubbing/scratching on the neck. Depends on the horse - some know what a pat means, had it all their lives, and I give gentle pats, too. I don't think many horses like the big huge whacks that some people give when patting a horse.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul. 9, 2008
    Posts
    724

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by sublimequine View Post
    I pet, I pat, I scritch.. whatever!

    My mare usually knows that any of the above is a positive thing, as it's accompanied with a "Good girl!".

    Ditto.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun. 22, 2008
    Location
    Outside Ocala FL - Horse Capital of the World
    Posts
    6,193

    Default

    I do all, pat, pet, scratch, rub (but then again, I am a certified equine sports massage therapist). It depends on what the horse likes and here they like it. My two geldings like a pat on the rump, but my mare would give me a good cow kick if I did that to her. Yet they all love the "meat tenderizing" fist pound massage stroke on their rumps (it "warms up" the large muscle masses there), and the "karate chop" strokes on their back muscles.

    I don't do the big whacking pats to any of them. Any everyday pats are very gentle, and usually up near the poll for some reason. Like after I put on the fly masks and I give them a light "pat, pat" and a "good horse" goes with it.
    There are friends and faces that may be forgotten, but there are horses that never will be. - Andy Adams



  8. #8
    Join Date
    May. 12, 2008
    Posts
    4,444

    Default

    Interestingly, I was just noticing something in my mare.

    We were jumping around and I made a course for myself. She was very up and excited and did not necessarily want to slow down.

    We jumped the course, she did great and I patted on the neck, like I always do. Apparently that is the sign that we are done jumping and she went right down to a trot without any instruction from me. So, at least she knows when she is done working - not sure if she knows 'good girl' from the pat.

    "Good girl' is usually a big rub up and down the neck, intermixed with patting. This is while riding.

    Good girl in ground work is a scratch near the whithers.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar. 14, 2004
    Location
    Left coast, left wing, left field
    Posts
    6,783

    Default

    Depends on the horse. I definitely have some that really do seem to like a good solid clap on the neck. Others like the gentle touch.

    I have a funny story about that. I was riding in a clinic. My horse at the time was a big, solid, foundation-type appy with a thick neck. I finished my exercise and clapped him on the neck. Another clinic participant sidled over to me and said in a low voice, "Horses hate that".

    It has become a joke in our barn. Couldn't ya just let ME decide what my horse likes and doesn't like? Is there no area that the opinionated know-it-all will stay out of? I could see if the horse had flinched or seemed in any way put off. But it was a reward commensurate with his conformation and outlook on life. Sheesh.
    Arrange whatever pieces come your way. - Virginia Woolf

    Did you know that if you say the word "GULLIBLE" really softly, it sounds like "ORANGES"?



  10. #10
    Join Date
    May. 4, 2003
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    15,994

    Default

    When Ian Millar used to finish a round he would literally whack his horses on the neck - now I notice he merely pats them. That looked excessive to me in those days so I became more conscious of how a horse might feel, and now I'm more gentle with a scratch, rub or massage. Each horse has a special 'ticky' spot where they like to be rubbed (face) or scratched (wither/neck) etc., not to
    forget bum, tail, rump or jowl, forelock.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep. 20, 2007
    Posts
    403

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Foxtrot's View Post
    When Ian Millar used to finish a round he would literally whack his horses on the neck - now I notice he merely pats them.
    Perhaps his enthusiasm may have one day interfered with balance, leaving his horse to celebrate the good work on his own.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jul. 24, 2006
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    5,647

    Default

    What do I do?

    It depends on what I'm trying to "say"



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Mar. 4, 2004
    Location
    Oxford, PA
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    1,508

    Default

    I always used to pat/slap my horse's neck after a good ride. I have learned that petting/stroking feels better to the horse. For example, which would feel better to you? Say you've just worked out. Would it feel better to you if someone came up and slapped you on your just-worked muscle or stroked/rubbed it? This analogy sure made sense to me and I've been a "petter/rubber" ever since



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Feb. 22, 2007
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    3,928

    Default

    I do all of them depending on the horse but I find most of them seem to prefer a rub or a scratch so that's usually what I do.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jan. 25, 2008
    Location
    Vermont
    Posts
    546

    Default

    Depends entirely. I usually pat from the saddle, especially if we're still in movement - but then, I have a verrrrry thick-skinned horse. I can curry him anywhere and he doesn't even notice.

    I've definitely ridden other horses who are a little hesitant about a good pat, and some very skittish horses that get more nervous about the quick movement of my hand than the actual pat.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jan. 16, 2002
    Location
    West Coast of Michigan
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    36,321

    Default

    Whatever suits me at the moment. I have a new mare who's very friendly but a little anxious and she seems to prefer rubbing and petting. The others are fine with some robust patting. I don't really think about it much. I do think they learn that, when being ridden, the "usual" 3-4 pats on the neck I give them along with "good boy/good girl" mean something specific, so I do that pretty consistently.
    Click here before you buy.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Oct. 4, 2003
    Location
    Clinton, BC
    Posts
    1,498

    Default

    The filly I have been working on getting broke this fall was always a stroking rather than patting individual. She was freaky since she came out of her mom, couldn't even look at her at first, let alone touch her. It took three months for her to come to me, to sneak up behind me and touch me with her nose. Took another month before I could touch her without panic setting in. No reason for this, it just WAS this way. Basic ground training has been difficult, she over reacts to everything. But she's getting better.

    This summer, the dentist came out and pulled her wolfies and floated her teeth prior to putting the bridle on her. I gave her a LARGE dose of atravet for this. He "patted" her, and even tranquilized, she didn't like it much. I explained to the dentist that "patting" wasn't her thing particularly, but I had been working on it, "patting" her with a single finger was the stage I was at. He did MORE patting while she was tranqed. In the following days, her aversion to patting had abated, and continued to be more accepting of a pat. I always think that if you CAN'T pat them, if they don't have the self confidence to accept a pat and know what it means, they are not ready to ride. I can now pat her adequately, and she knows what it means, but it's been a long learning session. Knowing now what a pat means, her self confidence has improved dramatically, and she has accepted the training much better. Laid over her back no problem before turning her out for winter.



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Aug. 22, 2000
    Location
    CT
    Posts
    2,602

    Default

    For me and most of the horses I have known, it depends on the situation.
    If I want to be reassuring or quietly rewarding, rubs work best. If we are building enthusiasm in a horse who is not shy of contact, a good strong pat can be appreciated and effective. Kind of like atheletes slapping each other on the butt. Its all in the context and knowing the receiver.



  19. #19
    Join Date
    May. 9, 2005
    Location
    Chattanooga, Tennessee
    Posts
    3,607

    Default

    Shiver actually likes a good solid pat. Even better is a BIG scratch. Petting she kind of ignores. It all depends on the individual horse



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Apr. 20, 2004
    Posts
    1,218

    Default

    [QUOTE=sublimequine;4517466]I pet, I pat, I scritch.. whatever! QUOTE]

    Ditto
    \"You have two choices when a defining moment comes along - you can either define the moment, or let the moment define you.\" Tin Cup



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