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  1. #1
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    May. 5, 2006
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    Default Define "Dressage Queen"

    I am writing an essay and need a good working definition of the term "dressage queen".

    Anyone care to define it?
    Sheilah



  2. #2
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    Feb. 23, 2008
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    Default

    LOL. I'd love to read that essay!

    Someone else might have a better idea, but to my mind it is a slightly derogatory term that implies the woman is so obsessed with dressage that she looks down at any other kind of riding/training (even if she doesn't know much about any other kind), and more than that, she is super obsessed with having very trendy, expensive things (saddle, clothing, horse) and likes people to know she associates with big name trainers... that sort of thing.



  3. #3
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    Jun. 29, 2008
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    San Diego
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    I was a DQ for Halloween! Think matching Tiara's for me and my horse (because a true DQ will have a horse who is equally as stuck-up), Lots of champion ribbons (they always have to win), Pink polo wraps (pink is a princess color, and DQ's think they are royalty), a saddle pad with a sponsor's logo on it, a dressage at devon ball cap (DQ goes not to ride, but for the social aspect), and a perfectly groomed and braided horse. Oh, and a groom in attendance.
    Proudly Owned By Sierra, 2003 APHA/ PtHA Mare



  4. #4
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    Default

    Good job! Keep 'em coming! This is going to be awesome.
    Sheilah



  5. #5
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    Oct. 31, 2009
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    Default

    Dressage Queens are Drama Queens with horses, often with more money than sense.



  6. #6
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    May. 20, 2005
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    Desert Southwest
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    Default

    People who take dressage (and themselves) waaaaay too seriously.

    DQ's can be either sex.
    Last edited by ThreeFigs; Nov. 23, 2009 at 06:54 PM. Reason: added thought



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug. 26, 1999
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    Concord, California, USA
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    Default

    I have a friend who defines DQs in two ways:

    1. GOOD DQs - those with the FEI level knowledge, excellent riders, good horsemen/horsewomen. Those who have "earned their stripes."

    2. BAD DQs - the wannabes with money; the ones who can ride decently but ride then sell horse after horse and buy another if they don't win; the ones who are good riders, but treat anyone who is "less" than they in supposed accomplishment like dirt; the spank and crankers - who are usually the ones that are constantly having to get new horses.... you get the picture.

    Heck, a friend of mine who is a GOOD DQ - took a little halter/racing cross 15.2 QH to PSG - always swore she was going to get license plates that said "DQFRMHEL". ROFLOL



  8. #8
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    Jun. 4, 2009
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Sandy M View Post
    I have a friend who defines DQs in two ways:

    1. GOOD DQs - those with the FEI level knowledge, excellent riders, good horsemen/horsewomen. Those who have "earned their stripes."

    2. BAD DQs - the wannabes with money; the ones who can ride decently but ride then sell horse after horse and buy another if they don't win; the ones who are good riders, but treat anyone who is "less" than they in supposed accomplishment like dirt; the spank and crankers - who are usually the ones that are constantly having to get new horses.... you get the picture.

    Heck, a friend of mine who is a GOOD DQ - took a little halter/racing cross 15.2 QH to PSG - always swore she was going to get license plates that said "DQFRMHEL". ROFLOL
    I agree with this...except I have adorned the "Good DQ's" with the name "Dressage Divas", so there is no confusion, !
    I told you: "inside leg to outside rein, not inside leg to outside rail!"



  9. #9
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    Oct. 26, 2009
    Location
    Sunny CA
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    Default

    Women who think, if they buy a Warmblood, their poop doesn't stink And it starts smelling GOOOOOD when they add bling to their browband.

    Oh, and most of them don't know how to pick out hooves or groom a dirty horse. Their custom Petries are always shiny, their Pikeur breeches are always spotless (easy to do when someone else grooms and tacks your horse), and no helmet smashes their carefully coifed hair.



  10. #10
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    Aug. 23, 2009
    Location
    Long Island, NY
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    Default

    Best explained with a little horse humor:

    THE DRESSAGE QUEEN:
    Has her hair in an elegant ponytail and is wearing a visor and gold earrings sporting a breed logo. A $100 dollar custom jumper ( also with breed logo) is worn over $300 dollar full-seat white breeches and custom Koenigs.
    Her horse, "Leistergeidelsprundheim" ("Fleistergeidel" for short) is a 17.3 hand warmblood who was bred to be a Grand Prix horse.
    The Germans are still laughing hysterically, as he was bred to be a Grand Prix JUMPER, but since he couldn't get out of his own way, they sold him to an American. His rider fell in love with his lofty gaits, proud carriage, and tremendous athleticism.
    She admires him mostly while lunging.
    She lunges him a lot, because she is not actually too keen to get up there and try to SIT that trot. When she rides, it's not for long, because (while he looks FINE to everyone else), she can tell that he is not as "thorough" and "supple" as he should be, and gets off to call the chiropractor/massage therapist/psychic, all of which is expensive, but he WILL be shown, and shown right after he perfects (fill in the blank).
    The (blank) changes often enough that the rider can avoid the stress of being beaten at Training 1 by a Quarter Horse.
    ... It don't mean a thing if it ain't got that Shwung



  11. #11
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    Feb. 8, 2007
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    Default

    I always associate DQs with pearls. A lot of the DQs I've run across wear pearls. And actually wear make-up when they ride.
    "It is not necessary for you to let everyone know everything about you. In fact, it is probably wise that you don't. There are some things that you need only discuss with God."



  12. #12
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    Nov. 13, 2005
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    Kentucky
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mor4ward View Post
    Best explained with a little horse humor:

    THE DRESSAGE QUEEN:
    Has her hair in an elegant ponytail and is wearing a visor and gold earrings sporting a breed logo. A $100 dollar custom jumper ( also with breed logo) is worn over $300 dollar full-seat white breeches and custom Koenigs.
    Her horse, "Leistergeidelsprundheim" ("Fleistergeidel" for short) is a 17.3 hand warmblood who was bred to be a Grand Prix horse.
    The Germans are still laughing hysterically, as he was bred to be a Grand Prix JUMPER, but since he couldn't get out of his own way, they sold him to an American. His rider fell in love with his lofty gaits, proud carriage, and tremendous athleticism.
    She admires him mostly while lunging.
    She lunges him a lot, because she is not actually too keen to get up there and try to SIT that trot. When she rides, it's not for long, because (while he looks FINE to everyone else), she can tell that he is not as "thorough" and "supple" as he should be, and gets off to call the chiropractor/massage therapist/psychic, all of which is expensive, but he WILL be shown, and shown right after he perfects (fill in the blank).
    The (blank) changes often enough that the rider can avoid the stress of being beaten at Training 1 by a Quarter Horse.
    This is my favorite!



  13. #13
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    Sep. 15, 2006
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    North of the Frozen Tundra, but I can see it from my house.
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    Default

    Search this forum for the long dressage queen thread that ran a couple of years ago. I think it is called "What makes a DQ?.

    Have fun!



  14. #14
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    Aug. 25, 2008
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    Florida
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    I actually HAD "Leistergeidelsprundheim" after she sold him to me . He was a splendid horse and turned out to be quite the nice young man once he got over his fear of cows, and quite normal, too. He dirtied up quite nicely... :P



  15. #15
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    Jun. 9, 2003
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    Alabama
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    Default

    I think a DQ has an attitude of superiority about herself, her horse and what she does in dressage and in the horseworld in general. She is demanding and overbearing about anything to do with herself and her horse at home or in a show/clinic situation. She is perfectionist (in her own mind), fussy to the point of boorishness and intolerant of others who she looks down upon. You can't tell her anything because she already knows it all. She is also demeaning of others' horses, tack, attire and anything else she cares to comment about. Doesn't win alot of friends. That's in the most negative sense. I agree, some "DQs" are likeable and deserve to be -- it's usually the wannabes that are described in the negative way.
    PennyG



  16. #16
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    Mar. 30, 2009
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    786

    Default

    I think many DQs actually buy new tack rather than clean the tack they own since their grooms aren't always around to do it for them. And said tack is always a gazillion dollars and the favored brand name of the moment. (I say this thinking of one person I know )
    My blog:

    RAWR



  17. #17

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by IdahoRider View Post
    I am writing an essay and need a good working definition of the term "dressage queen".

    Anyone care to define it?
    Sheilah
    well,in all honesty the ones who have garnered that title for me, have been passive aggressive attention seekers who have failed at something else and moved to horses for entertainment...money buys the look but not the skill and they don't "get" that memo....

    the riders and horsemen don't seek attention and when their horse does badly take it very much on themselves as to how they could have improved things..other folks,not so much them as blaming the crowd noise,the horses hormones,the weather,the saddle,the angle of the sun as it hit the judges booth and on and on and on...

    best
    Production Acres,Pro A Welsh Cobs
    I am one of the last 210,000 remaining full time farmers in America.We feed the others.



  18. #18

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by TKR View Post
    I think a DQ has an attitude of superiority about herself, her horse and what she does in dressage and in the horseworld in general. She is demanding and overbearing about anything to do with herself and her horse at home or in a show/clinic situation. She is perfectionist (in her own mind), fussy to the point of boorishness and intolerant of others who she looks down upon. You can't tell her anything because she already knows it all.
    I know someone like this. She doesn't even really ride. But yeah. I think "Dressage Queen" and I think of someone like her.



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Dec. 16, 2008
    Posts
    530

    Default

    Pretty much what everyone else has already said ...

    At our barn we have 2 definitions of a DQ:

    1) Someone who has so much money she thinks $1900 is cheap for a secondhand saddle, who calls every horse that isn't a 17+-hand WB a "cute little horse" (and genuinely thinks she is giving a sincere compliment!), who rides at such high levels she can't be bothered to help out at barn schooling shows, unlike most of the other boarders, and who cannot see past the end of her turned-up nose to realize what life is like in the non-DQ world.

    2) Someone who paid around $50,000 for an import that was rejected by its native European country's breed registry and was sold to an American (like "Fleister" in a previous post), who pays a trainer to come to her barn and school her horse but rarely rides him herself, who--when she does ride--spends her entire 15 minutes of ride time schooling circles at the trot and has not cantered since the day she decided to ride outside the arena and her horse bolted across the pasture.

    Not that these are necessarily people the rest of us look down on--it's more a case of we feel kinda sorry for them and wish they would walk into the real world and get their boots and their horse's white polo wraps a little grubby! We would welcome them with open arms!



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jan. 23, 2009
    Location
    Birmingham, Alabama
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    49

    Default DQ's

    This is killing me. I've known so many dq's that i try so hard
    to do everything the opposite. As I've matured, I've realized
    the best success is staying in the saddle when your young
    warmblood you should have resisted buying is bucking and/or
    twirling. I'm just trying to survive these days. No room for
    attitude here, but I sure know alot of dq's. I think the best
    way to sum it up is that dq's think they are superior to everyone else. And there are plenty of dressage trainers
    at the upper levels that represent that. All you have to
    do is go watch in Wellington or Devon. Kind of makes you
    want to throw up. Dressage doesn't have a welcoming
    personality to it as represented by the people involved.
    Too much arrogance!
    LISA



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