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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb. 10, 2006
    Posts
    182

    Default best basic dressage/riding book for AA

    I would love to hear some recommendations for the beginner adult amatuer rider to learn some correct dressage/riding skills. It would also help if it was an easy read with mostly basic instruction, nothing that gets into higher level dressage movements. i would love to give the readers my Mary Wanless...but they would never get through that kind of book at this point.
    thanks in advance



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar. 28, 2006
    Posts
    2,038

    Default

    Sally Swift "Centered Riding"
    "The stumbler doesn’t build her life by being better than others, but by being better than she used to be."
    David Brooks



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2000
    Posts
    24,408

    Default

    Practical Dressage by Lindquist.

    I don't think Centered Riding is a good idea as a first book for an amateur to get the basic ideas of what it's about.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    May. 6, 2007
    Posts
    1,057

    Default

    I'm a beginner AA!

    Centered Riding is the first one I'd recommend. Very practical, with in the saddle tactics you can practice.

    For a more theoretical read, Dressage in Lightness is very good. It is also well illustrated, and visuals really help me 'get it."

    Then, for practice, my trainer gave me Leslie Webb's 'Build a Better Athlete" - a workbook of 16 gymnastics. I practice them often and they are helping me build fundamental skills (correct bending, effective half halt.)
    Don't wrassle with a hog. You just get dirty, and the hog likes it.

    Collecting Thoroughbreds - tales of a re-rider and some TBs



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug. 14, 2004
    Posts
    7,540

    Default

    Dressage in Harmony - Walter Zettl - even tho it has "advanced" movements it is very easy book to understand.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr. 15, 2008
    Posts
    1,228

    Default

    Anything by Jane Savoie.



  7. #7
    Lisa Holman Guest

    Default

    Lessons with Lendon.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct. 11, 2007
    Location
    Andover, MA
    Posts
    6,682

    Default

    So far, as a not terribly talented AA, I've found the following to be the most useful:

    Lessons with Lendon
    Jane Savoie's "motivational" books
    101 Dressage Exercises for Horse and Rider
    Centered Riding (not dressage specifically, but good basics and explanations of how a human's body affects the horse.)



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct. 10, 2001
    Location
    The Peoples\' Republic of Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA
    Posts
    237

    Default Don't read books:-)

    Kidding but not really!
    I'm an older AA who began riding as an adult. Trying to learn from books (including most of those listed above) was a HUGE obstacle for me for years--trying to reproduce positions and feelings that my body really didn't "understand" from the inside out just created more stiffness, clamping and frustration.
    My current trainer told me to "stop reading, start riding and feeling" to get away from the habit of intellectualizing. It helped me establish the basics much more quickly and effectively.
    Recently, I am sufficiently "established" that I can read and get more from reading.
    Just my experience. Your learning style may vary:-)
    Never give up. Never give in. Never, never, never.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun. 23, 2004
    Location
    Fauquier County, VA
    Posts
    10,467

    Default

    Have you considered any videos instead? I have some Walter Zettl videos that are amazing.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    May. 1, 2001
    Location
    Paris, Kentucky
    Posts
    699

    Default Dressage Rider's Survival Guide

    While shamelessly self-promoting, I recommend Dressage Rider's Survival Guide, especially after you've tackled some of the more serious books. It sort of puts the whole dressage journey in perspective, in a humorous way. Over the years, I've received numerous testaments from readers who found Survival Guide very liberating.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Apr. 15, 2008
    Posts
    1,228

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mao View Post
    While shamelessly self-promoting, I recommend Dressage Rider's Survival Guide, especially after you've tackled some of the more serious books. It sort of puts the whole dressage journey in perspective, in a humorous way. Over the years, I've received numerous testaments from readers who found Survival Guide very liberating.
    Can we get it through Amazon? Always love having a good laugh...



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug. 5, 2007
    Posts
    1,421

    Default

    First of all, if you don’t know of this site, it is great for used and new books, you don’t need to know more than the author’s last name or the title to find a book, video, etc.
    http://www.alibris.com/

    I recommend these, though they are older book and the tests have changed.
    Riding Logic by Wilheim Museler, Kurd Albrecht Von Ziegner (Editor), Harold Erenberg (Translator)
    Dressage for beginners by R. L. V. Ffrench Blake

    For real readers, there are several editions of this, which belongs on any dressage rider’s good book list.
    Horsemanship: A Comprehensive Book on Training the Horse and Its Rider by Waldemar Seunig, Leonard Mins (Translator)

    For advanced theorists interested in dressage as art, the following is a must read, but not for novices
    Understanding equitation. by Jean Saint-Fort Paillard

    No substitute for in-the-saddle with a good teacher, of course.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Oct. 11, 2009
    Location
    SF Bay Area
    Posts
    127

    Default

    I second D_BaldStockings.
    A good instructor is the best. I am very lucky to have great instructors.
    Also all horses are teachers. From greenies to GP Schoolmasters!

    Also: Dressage in Lightness by Sylia Loch is fantastic
    and USDF Guide to Dressage (everything from nuts and bolts to GP)



  15. #15
    Join Date
    May. 6, 2009
    Location
    The Left Coast
    Posts
    3,318

    Default

    I don't think anyone has mentioned Common Sense Dressage by Sally O'Connor. It's a classic.
    2012 goal: learn to ride like a Barn Rat

    A helmet saved my life.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    May. 31, 2007
    Posts
    116

    Default

    I think Dressage in Harmony (Zettl) and Centered Riding (Sally Swift) are the first things anybody should read.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jun. 11, 2004
    Location
    Still here ~ not yet there
    Posts
    7,065

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by D_BaldStockings View Post
    First of all, if you don’t know of this site, it is great for used and new books, you don’t need to know more than the author’s last name or the title to find a book, video, etc.
    http://www.alibris.com/
    As most people already know, Amazon.com also has many, many used booksellers than seller through their site. I get most of my books that way and pay MUCH less. So far they have all been in the condition states by the seller.

    Lots of cool out of print stuff.



  18. #18
    Join Date
    May. 1, 2001
    Location
    Paris, Kentucky
    Posts
    699

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Arizona DQ View Post
    Can we get it through Amazon? Always love having a good laugh...
    Yes. Or directly from Half Halt Press.



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2000
    Posts
    24,408

    Default

    Clara Luisa, I think the problem you describe is very common. It results in an awful lot of 'paralysis by analysis' and overintellectualization, in which folks learn about so many methods and so many ideas they are so confused they don't know what to do at any one given moment! Or they read the ideal in a book and are then afraid to do anything practical. Or they feel riding and their aids are so harmful to the delicate horse they can't use their aids effectively. Or they argue with the instructor, and move from one to another because none are as good as the book!

    I think it's extremely important to be able to 'read and ride'. Some folks are like alcoholics with dressage books - they just have to go cold turkey and not read! I've watched so many instructors tear their hair out trying to deal with these folks!

    It's really much later in the process in which reading becomes important, though. One first has to master the basics and there's an awful lot of confusion and 'just do it' during that phase. That phase really just can't be as 'self guided' as many people want it to be. Instruction is needed.

    I think if one is getting a gift, it's a sign of the giver's affection for the person. Buy the book YOU like best, or if it's the kind of person who can't accept that gracefully, ask them for a list of titles they want!



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jul. 19, 2001
    Posts
    8,542

    Default

    slc says:

    It results in an awful lot of 'paralysis by analysis' and overintellectualization,



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