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  1. #1
    horses2009 Guest

    Question beginning riding

    Hi. I am new at riding and have been taking lessons now for about 7 months. So far, I have done posting the trot and half seat. I am not planning on any particular discipline, but I just want to learn to ride. I thought I was doing well, and my legs were getting stronger. Then I had a new person teach me who just made things so much worse. My hands had to be up by the martingale and I have to lean forward so much and my heels are forced down. I don't feel right in the saddle, and my back is about a 45 degree angle to the ground, which I don't think is right, either. How does one know if they are getting a good teacher?

    Any help would be appreciated.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul. 4, 2006
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    1,580

    Default

    Where are you located? Someone on this board can probably recommend a good program to you.
    -Debbie / NH

    My Blog: http://deborahsulli.blogspot.com/



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb. 8, 2006
    Location
    NE OK
    Posts
    731

    Default

    It can be really, really tough to find good instruction that is a good fit for YOU. At my barn, there are 2 instructors with two very different styles. And almost all teachers are gong to have a slightly different position they want you in, which can vary from horse to horse.
    Visit the barns in your area. Try to meet the horses, check out the tack room, talk to the instructors and ask what goals they would want you to meet and how they would get you there. And instructor that can't explain WHY they want you to do things a certain way in a way you can understand is not going to be a good fit.
    It does help to have a goal: I want to event, I want to learn to train horses, I want to be able to hack out on the trails, I want to show.
    As an aside, the position the new instructor wants you to have can be EXTREMELY beneficial in developing an independent seat and leg, which if you can post is about where you need to be.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb. 19, 2009
    Posts
    5,588

    Default

    agreed about visiting a lot of barns and finding a place that works for you. I think I've been to about 5-6 barns in the past 3 years trying to find one that works for me. I am happy where I am right now and feel that for the most part, everything is a good fit.

    I would also try talking to your instructor about the why of doing things. They are more than happy to explain the mechanics behind their training methods. And keep in mind what you are doing now might feel horrible because your body is not used to it. I had the habit of leaning forward and it took many lessons of my instructor yelling at me to lean back and me actually doing it for the muscle memory to start to kick in. Before that I felt like I was behind the vertical!



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug. 19, 2007
    Posts
    822

    Default

    As a trainer, it's hard to give advice based just on your post. And as a new rider, it's certainly hard to know what's "right". Are these two trainers at the same barn? The tough thing is, and NOT saying this is the case for the OP, sometimes new riders end up with horrible trainers because they simply don't know any better.

    It is possible that the new trainer has you riding like this because you were behind the motion or balancing on your hands. I've had students who *thought* they were balanced way behind the vertical and waterskiing on the reins, and if this habit is ingrained, they *feel* like they are 45 degrees in front of the vertical when they are first redirected to find a proper position. But it's also possible that you were doing just fine and the new trainer isn't a good fit for you. I second the idea of revealing your location and getting some recommendations from folks here...Or if you are comfortable and feel like you are making progress with Trainer #1, stick with him/her.

    Another suggestion: get a friend to video a lesson with each trainer. This could be an eye-opener re: your position, or it could just confirm that you are riding better with trainer #1.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct. 30, 2001
    Location
    Northern Virginia
    Posts
    1,283

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tinah View Post
    It can be really, really tough to find good instruction that is a good fit for YOU. At my barn, there are 2 instructors with two very different styles. And almost all teachers are gong to have a slightly different position they want you in, which can vary from horse to horse.
    Visit the barns in your area. Try to meet the horses, check out the tack room, talk to the instructors and ask what goals they would want you to meet and how they would get you there. And instructor that can't explain WHY they want you to do things a certain way in a way you can understand is not going to be a good fit.
    It does help to have a goal: I want to event, I want to learn to train horses, I want to be able to hack out on the trails, I want to show.
    As an aside, the position the new instructor wants you to have can be EXTREMELY beneficial in developing an independent seat and leg, which if you can post is about where you need to be.
    I'll second this.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul. 1, 2007
    Posts
    496

    Default

    Get a copy of George Morris' book "Hunter Seat Equitation". It is the touchstone of riding.

    Video tape your lessons. Go to a few shows in your discipline and observe the riders there.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov. 9, 2009
    Location
    California
    Posts
    23

    Default

    Many different instructors have different styles of riding. Watching other people ride helps a lot and can give you an idea on how you should look. For example go to YouTube.com and search usef medal or maclay medal, there you can watch some of the best riders in the country.

    Also you might want to ask around for some good trainers to make sure you are being taught properly.

    Hope this helps!
    EveryEquestrian.com An equine marketing service catering to horse buyers, sellers, and breeders.



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