The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 21 to 40 of 42
  1. #21
    Join Date
    Nov. 30, 2008
    Posts
    135

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Hampton Bay View Post
    ... but I feed epsom salts at 1/4 cup..
    Holy mother of horse poison!!! Epsom Salts=Magnesium Sulfate. Magnesium Sulfate=EUTHANIZING AGENT. Your decision to save a buck=VERY BAD HORSE MANAGEMENT.

    The Magnesium in Quiesscence and other supplemental type products is different and safe. Mag. Sulfate slows heart rhythms and is unhealthy. I can't believe I just read such a crazy idea. This is insane. For the love of your horse, collect some recycling cans, cash 'em in, and use the money to give your horse something safe.
    My treasures do not chink, nor glitter. They carry me to great heights, they gleam in the sun, and they neigh in the night. That is my life, at the end of the day.



  2. #22
    Join Date
    Feb. 8, 2008
    Location
    Delaware Valley
    Posts
    1,658

    Default

    Please stop screaming in capital letters! Magnesium oxide and magnesium sulfate are similar. The injectable that is used by certain people for calming purposes is magnesium sulfate. It's no crazier than giving magnesium in other forms. For the record, I don't use it in any form. I've tried it with zero effect and consider it a totally crazy waste of money



  3. #23
    Join Date
    Sep. 6, 2012
    Location
    Moved South from North Pole
    Posts
    752

    Default epsom salts

    We know an Arab who has been given epsom salts daily every since he survived colic surgery in 2002. We've heard of people using it for themselves as a laxative. All with no illness or deaths.

    We don't use it internally as a form of magnesium comes in our grain. But it's great for soaking a sore hoof.

    This is an old thread btw.



  4. #24
    Join Date
    Jan. 16, 2002
    Location
    West Coast of Michigan
    Posts
    36,321

    Default

    Mag. Sulfate slows heart rhythms and is unhealthy. I can't believe I just read such a crazy idea. This is insane. For the love of your horse, collect some recycling cans, cash 'em in, and use the money to give your horse something safe.
    Holy mother of drama queen implosions and getting a D minus in chemistry class!

    Magnesium is magnesium for the most part. Don't inject it. Don't give too much. Make sure there's enough in their diet. The healthy body will take care of the rest.
    Click here before you buy.


    5 members found this post helpful.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Sep. 27, 2000
    Location
    Southern California - on a freeway someplace
    Posts
    9,789

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by deltawave View Post
    Holy mother of drama queen implosions and getting a D minus in chemistry class!

    Magnesium is magnesium for the most part. Don't inject it. Don't give too much. Make sure there's enough in their diet. The healthy body will take care of the rest.
    Thank you for getting to this and doing so so wittily before I could. Seemed like I should do more than just give you a green thumb.
    The Evil Chem Prof



  6. #26
    Join Date
    Jan. 16, 2002
    Location
    West Coast of Michigan
    Posts
    36,321

    Default

    Could you get me a decent grade in chemistry? It would be a first . . .
    Click here before you buy.



  7. #27
    Join Date
    Dec. 13, 1999
    Location
    Greensboro, NC
    Posts
    35,868

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Hippolyta View Post
    I am pretty sure the powder is 56% MgO, not 56% Mg

    Mg = 24.3050 g/mol
    O = 15.9994 g/ mol
    MgO = 40.3044 g/mol ...Mg is about 60% of MgO by mass

    someone else can do the stoichiometry for you. I need paper & my brain is rusty
    Magnesium Oxide is 56% elemental Mg, so Sucker was right

    Mag Ox is not a form - it's not powder, not pellet, it's a combination mineral. It can be found in various man-made forms. If it's sold as plain MgOx, then it's 56% Mg. But it might be some % of a formulated product, such as pelleted, maybe 40% MgOx, then other binders, flavors, etc, in which case you'd have to multiply by .4 then by .56 to get how much actual Mg there is.
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  8. #28
    Join Date
    Jul. 3, 2012
    Location
    Twin Cities
    Posts
    2,200

    Default

    http://www.magox.com/healthcaretypes.htm or http://www.webelements.com/compounds...ium_oxide.html

    Magnesium Oxide (anhydrous) 603mg Mg/g MgO

    But, here is a label

    http://shop.2farm.com/pdf/PRODUCT%20...S/A0002325.pdf

    Because there are things in the bag besides MgO, you are right, it is 57mg Mg/g of stuff. Right on Nutrition/Feed mixing test. I would be right on my Chem test
    Last edited by Hippolyta; Jan. 11, 2013 at 11:30 PM.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Sep. 27, 2000
    Location
    Southern California - on a freeway someplace
    Posts
    9,789

    Default

    You'd have to enroll in my class, which might present logistical issues since I don't teach online. Yet. Perhaps with our governor's announcement yesterday, distance ed is in my future.

    But, in the fine tradition of academic institutions everywhere I can give you an honorary A in OChem. (that's supposed to be applause)
    The Evil Chem Prof


    1 members found this post helpful.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Jul. 10, 2001
    Posts
    6,711

    Default


    Hold it. MgO is 61 wt% Mg. Yes, MgO is 50at% Mg.

    Where do you get 56%?



  11. #31
    Join Date
    Jul. 3, 2012
    Location
    Twin Cities
    Posts
    2,200

    Default

    I had the same question. Then I looked at the label:

    The bag of MgO isn't just MgO. I figured the term "Magnesium Oxide 56%" meant that it was 56% MgO, but it isn't. The label says it is 95% MgO.

    60% of 95% = 57% elemental Mg



  12. #32
    Join Date
    Feb. 1, 2012
    Location
    Vermont
    Posts
    5,246

    Default

    I wad using a previous posters number of 56% MagOx according to their bag. Just to understand the math.
    "If you think nobody cares about you, try missing a couple payments..."



  13. #33
    Join Date
    Mar. 24, 2012
    Posts
    1,785

    Default

    . I've tried it with zero effect and consider it a totally crazy waste of money
    For you, it would be a waste of money if no results but I have had amazing results over the yrs with a few horses and as far as I know I'm not a supplement crazy person.

    I suspect it may be true that the reason it gives great results for some and no results for others COULD? be because some have deficiencies and some do not.

    I'm sold because it helped some horses very clearly but yes did not have any effect with some others. So, not 'crazy' when it helps.

    PS I could say that hock injections are a crazy waste of money because they didn't help for one of my horses but, nah, they do help some horses.



  14. #34
    Join Date
    Dec. 13, 1999
    Location
    Greensboro, NC
    Posts
    35,868

    Default

    Trying Mg supplementation and getting zero results only means it was a waste of $$ for your horse at that time, meaning that horse at that time wasn't deficient, didn't have a need for higher than normal levels.

    That does not mean supp'ing Mg is ever a waste of time, as there are very valid reasons why a horse might need it.
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  15. #35
    Join Date
    Jan. 16, 2002
    Location
    West Coast of Michigan
    Posts
    36,321

    Default

    There is a difference between thoughtful and rational supplementation of magnesium (and any other nutrient) and the prevailing idea that magnesium is the answer to a multitude of problems that are generally not even remotely related to magnesium deficiency, like a horse being "hot". I'm sure you could find an individual here and there who developed symptoms of being "hot" due to magnesium deficiency, but the vast majority of horses out there being treated for anxiety or being hot or whatever are probably not in a diseased state of magnesium deprivation. A lot of people, however, love the quick/safe fix and are brainwashed into thinking salvation can be found at the bottom of a supplement bucket.
    Click here before you buy.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  16. #36
    Join Date
    Mar. 24, 2012
    Posts
    1,785

    Default

    I've kept horses on and off for several decades. At the moment I have just one horse on magnesium and the other 8 in the barn are not on any supplements except a vit/min supp for the easy keepers who get a handful of grain.

    BRAINWASHED! lol



  17. #37
    Join Date
    Nov. 8, 2012
    Location
    gulf coast
    Posts
    1,014

    Default

    I posted this web page on another thread but it might have value here also
    http://www.understanding-horse-nutri...magnesium.html
    At the bottom of the page she talks about MagOx.



  18. #38
    Join Date
    Jul. 10, 2001
    Posts
    6,711

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by csaper58 View Post
    I posted this web page on another thread but it might have value here also
    http://www.understanding-horse-nutri...magnesium.html
    At the bottom of the page she talks about MagOx.
    Thanks for the sales ad. There is no valid justification for her statements.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  19. #39
    Join Date
    Feb. 8, 2008
    Location
    Delaware Valley
    Posts
    1,658

    Default

    This article that just showed up on my Facebook feed (How Anecdotal Evidence Can Undermine Scientific Results) is rather timely -

    http://www.scientificamerican.com/ar...ntific-results

    I'm not saying all anecdotal evidence is false or suspect, just offering this as food for thought. (This is an old article, but - honestly - it really did just show up on my Facebook feed with the comment, "We're hardwired to believe anecdotes and myths, not facts.")



  20. #40
    Join Date
    Jan. 16, 2002
    Location
    West Coast of Michigan
    Posts
    36,321

    Default

    "We're hardwired to believe anecdotes and myths, not facts."
    Might have to make that my signature line!

    I love the emphasis on Wigmore, who still, STILL has believers touting chapter and verse of the chlorophyll nonsense. Passionately, and with intense conviction, despite NO actual facts.

    All it takes is passionate conviction and a plausible story line, and you will find some followers. Facts? Pfft--optional.
    Click here before you buy.



Similar Threads

  1. Magnesium Deficiency?
    By bambamalter in forum Horse Care
    Replies: 54
    Last Post: Dec. 19, 2011, 11:47 AM
  2. Magnesium 3,000 or 5,000?
    By Swishy-Tails in forum Horse Care
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: Nov. 16, 2011, 10:03 AM
  3. Effects of magnesium
    By myalter1 in forum Horse Care
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: May. 11, 2011, 09:42 AM
  4. Magnesium vs. Vit B1 (thiamine).
    By Cruisesmom in forum Horse Care
    Replies: 31
    Last Post: Jan. 10, 2011, 12:51 PM
  5. Magnesium Oxide v.s. Di-Magnesium Malate?
    By Fantastic in forum Horse Care
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: Sep. 8, 2010, 10:46 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
randomness