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  1. #1
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    Default Automatic release vs Crest release

    There has been a change over the years about the release used by Professionals or upper level riders, which is the proper way now? When I was a kid jumping out of hand was the sign of true horseman with good skill and someone who had great control and contact. I see so many upper level riders not doing this, is this a trend or is there a good reason for it?
    Mai Tai aka Tyler RIP March 1994-December 2011
    Grief is the price we pay for love- Gretchen Jackson
    "And here she comes. Is it a bird? Is it a plane? No, it's ZENYATTA!"



  2. #2
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    Jul. 24, 2006
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    Default

    If you watch the really good riders at the upper levels you'll see that they use whichever release is appropriate for the fence (and the particular horse). In reality there is no black and white "automatic or crest" rule. Each has it's place and use and a good rider uses them both.



  3. #3
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    Jul. 30, 2008
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    Default

    What you learned as a kid was right but sadly not a lot of people can do an auto release these days. I do agree though that the great riders do both depending on the jump and how to get the best performance out of their horse. But I do think that the auto release should be taught more because there are a lot of riders that are ready for it but never learn how.



  4. #4
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    Can someone explain when a crest release is the right release and not an automatic one?
    Mai Tai aka Tyler RIP March 1994-December 2011
    Grief is the price we pay for love- Gretchen Jackson
    "And here she comes. Is it a bird? Is it a plane? No, it's ZENYATTA!"



  5. #5
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    Nov. 9, 2007
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by PNWjumper View Post
    If you watch the really good riders at the upper levels you'll see that they use whichever release is appropriate for the fence (and the particular horse). In reality there is no black and white "automatic or crest" rule. Each has it's place and use and a good rider uses them both.
    ditto
    (|--Sarah--|)

    Blitz <3 & Leap of Faith <3



  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by ivy62 View Post
    Can someone explain when a crest release is the right release and not an automatic one?
    a crest release is best for when you are not positive that you will have complete self-reliance on balance over the fence. this is why you will never see a beginner using an auto release--not only do they not know what it is (because they are not taught it for this reason) but they will not have the strength or skill to rely on themselves for balance--they rely on the horses neck for some extra balance and support in case something goes wrong.

    but a GOOD crest release (this excludes the beginners, because they are still learning and what not) by upper level riders is usually a "just in case" type of release, the way i see it--upper level riders should and generally are able to rely upon themselves for balance over the fence, and will not need to lean on the neck for dear life. BUT, if im going to a big fence and im not seeing the BEST distance possible, and lets say my horse likes to crack his back over the jump, I'd feel a little bit safer with a crest release. ive ridden some horses who jump VERY hard and really round, it FEELS impossible to stay neatly in the tack (that is not to say it cannot be done, because it certainly can and i have) but on these horses, i feel like if something went wrong i would have a very hard time keeping myself balanced over the fence with an auto release--because even if you do not rely on the horse for balance on a normal basis, with a crest release, the neck is still there if you NEED it.

    however, i do feel that an auto release really allows the horse to use himself much better over a bigger fence (i don't see much of a difference at lower levels as far as the horses jumping ability)
    (|--Sarah--|)

    Blitz <3 & Leap of Faith <3



  7. #7
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    Jan. 19, 2004
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    Aberdeen, Scotland
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by PNWjumper View Post
    If you watch the really good riders at the upper levels you'll see that they use whichever release is appropriate for the fence (and the particular horse). In reality there is no black and white "automatic or crest" rule. Each has it's place and use and a good rider uses them both.
    I think it does have a lot to do with the horse. I was never taught to use an automatic release but on one of my horses, I use an auto release over every fence. On my other horse, crest release every single time.

    I really don't know why this is. I am certainly not in the 'upper level rider' camp and don't consciously do anything differently. Perhaps it's just what feels best with that particular horse...



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