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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct. 26, 2006
    Posts
    420

    Default All Warmbloods are dangerous???? Help needed.

    Have an older super good friend that bought a lovely imported German warmblood 16 hand mare. Dead quiet and sweet. 5 yr old un-started kid could (and has) ride her. Lesson horse for 3 years. Went to Youth Dressage Team Championships without ever having showed before and competed successfully at first level with a young lady who flew in the week before and only had 5 lessons / rides on the mare before the championships!!! Real deal sweet mare. If you do not pick her up she trots around like old Jeb if you pick her up she really can move. Saint of a mare.

    Mare could be fed in a field up here with 4 other mares and never had any arguments, noise or kicking. In her stall down there she 'supposedly' is kicking, biting her stall door and squealing when she eats. Could be that she doesn't like the loose horses wandering down the aisle or maybe it is the loose donkeys wandering by her stall. Who knows I am not there to see. But because of this the current BO is telling the owners that "All warmbloods are dangerous" instead of making the mare feel like she is safe when she does get her grain.

    She is in need of a boarding barn close to Jacksonville / Amelia Island in FL. Somewhere where the BO will NOT tell her "ALL WARMBLOODS ARE DANGEROUS! You should have bought a QH for dressage." Are you flipping kidding me???

    She does not need instruction per see just a nice, clean and SAFE place with a ring and very competent horse management care.

    Private family owned facility would be ok as long as the care was first rate and knowledgeable. Both ladies (mare and owners) are incredibly sweet and easy to live with. Would prefer dressage or even eventing but hunter or even western would also work as long as all other requirements are met.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan. 11, 2008
    Location
    Windsor SC till Aug
    Posts
    1,410

    Default

    Cant help you out, but that BO sounds like a fruit cake. I've seen more cranky QH at feeding time than any other breed... Ok, maybe equal with some arabs that give good dirty looks...

    Sounds like that BO shouldnt set foot in a barn, let alone own one and operate a boarding facility...
    Last edited by butlerfamilyzoo; Oct. 23, 2009 at 10:44 AM.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun. 23, 2004
    Location
    Loudoun County, VA
    Posts
    10,423

    Default

    I would change the thread title to indicate you are seeking recommendations for a boarding barn in/around Amelia Island.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug. 5, 2006
    Posts
    5,045

    Default

    And let me guess...BO happens to have the perfect quarter horse for sale.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb. 22, 2009
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    2,665

    Default

    Hmmm will have to tell the WB stallion I use for lunge lessons that he is danerous : )

    Alot of horses get crabby during feeding time. Honestly I would just move the horse.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2000
    Posts
    24,408

    Default

    DNMR

    (does not merit response)

    RALMO

    (read and laugh, move on)

    OSLABB

    (on same level as balloon boy)

    Some horses kick and bite during eating. They're just trying to defend their feed. I think some horses are more apt to do this, but I think it's more common with horses fed hay or grain while turned out in a herd, more so if space is limited and the feeds are placed close together. Most horses, if they're not ever put under pressure, will not get so defensive.

    The most hysterical biting and kicking I saw in any barn, was in a place where there were fifty horses and it took staff nearly an hour to feed the whole barn. By the end of the hour the horses at the end of the line were ready to bite the ears off Mike Tyson.

    Another place I was at, they fed hay from chutes that went into the stalls, and the chutes were together, the stalls had bars instead of partitions, and it drove all the horses crazy to have their hay thrown down like that. They were all rearing and attacking each other after a couple weeks in that barn.

    For some bizarre reason, people tend to feed the most frantic animals last, and put them in the most open stalls where they are driven completely nuts every feeding time. Why not make changes that help the animal have a better quality of life. I'll never figure that one out.
    Last edited by slc2; Oct. 24, 2009 at 12:55 AM.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr. 8, 2004
    Location
    The Great, uh, Green (?!?!) North!
    Posts
    3,768

    Default

    I had a barn owner once tell me that TBs should NEVER be owned by ammy riders.

    Good luck finding a new farm!
    "Adulthood? You're playing with ponies. That is, like, every 9 year old girl's dream. Adulthood?? You're rocking the HELL out of grade 6, girl."



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct. 25, 2005
    Posts
    1,735

    Default I googled these

    Elite Equine Services, Katharine Jenkins Eventing Team, Ivanhoe Farms Equestrian Center,
    Christine Cramer - Basic Training and Grand Prix Dressage, S. LIESETTE JURGENS dressage,
    TRUMPETEER DRESSAGE (says she is .8 hours from Jax.)
    I know nothing about these folks but it is a place to start. You may also contact the North Eastern Florida Dressage Association, they have a website. There are others but these were closer to the dressage type riders.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug. 9, 2007
    Posts
    9,050

    Default

    Depends on the BO, not the horse!

    I've boarded where my German WB could do no wrong, but where the BO,, whom I later found out didn't like TBs and didn't like mares, called Callie "psycho mare." Next BO said Callie was "perfect' and "had never put a hoof wrong" while she thought Cloudy was awful.

    So BOs have their own likes and dislikes, heck some of them here don't like horses period. The thing with WBs is that you cannot let them push you around on the ground since they are so big and powerful.

    I agree with the posters who say move. When a BO dislikes your horse, you should try to find a place where the BO likes that particular registry or breed or sex.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2000
    Posts
    24,408

    Default

    Honestly, if a lot of the horses are getting all worked up during feeding I usually think there's something wrong with how the facility is laid out or how things are done, they should make some effort to keep things peaceful and running smoothly. It's not good if rehabbing horses are leaping up and down and kicking for a half hour before each feeding. I also don't think it's a good sign if the BO/Manager is doing a ton of griping about the horses's behavior, it usually goes along with being a little slap happy and having a short temper.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb. 8, 2002
    Posts
    4,941

    Default

    Behavioral issues can certainly show up once you start keeping horses in the barn versus pasture. It's simply a matter of closer quarters and less exercise.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan. 31, 2003
    Posts
    18,472

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by slc2 View Post
    Honestly, if a lot of the horses are getting all worked up during feeding I usually think there's something wrong with how the facility is laid out or how things are done, they should make some effort to keep things peaceful and running smoothly. It's not good if rehabbing horses are leaping up and down and kicking for a half hour before each feeding. I also don't think it's a good sign if the BO/Manager is doing a ton of griping about the horses's behavior, it usually goes along with being a little slap happy and having a short temper.

    This is so true, I agree w/it 100%. For some reason we have gotten trained that it is ok and normal for horses to act like vicious carnivores at feeding time, and no one thinks about WHY they are acting this way.. and what it is doing to them..

    horses were not designed to eat a meal of concentrates. The basic idea begins the trouble. Add too much feed, too much sugar, too much starch, too much anticipation.. and you have rampaging horses whose stomachs most likely hurt at feeding time.

    One of the things that routinely surprises people here is how *quiet* feeding time is. It's low key. If it's not, I change things so that it is. I also retrain the horses to be relaxed about food. That takes some time if they are coming off a sugarey feed and/or were in a situation that made them frantic at feeding time.

    Guess what.. no ulcer issues around here. I think it's interesting to say the least.
    "Kindness is free" ~ Eurofoal
    ---
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Apr. 28, 2004
    Location
    Saratoga Springs, NY
    Posts
    4,545

    Default

    We also don't have any issues here about feeding time. Even with the majority fed in the paddocks in groups, we don't get anything more than a snarky face as each goes to their own bucket.
    As for the BO, I'm going to disagree with what another poster said. Your friend doesn't need to find a barn/BO that likes WBs and dressage, she needs one that doesn't give a rats patoot about what the horse is or how she rides, but can handle the horse and whose level of care allows the horse and owner to be relaxed and happy.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2000
    Posts
    24,408

    Default

    OMY GOD! I just came in from feeding my dangerous warmbloods! Medic!!!!!

    Look out, Warmbloods are raging everywhere!

    We got a delivery of the new Very Desirable Perfume Hay, and they frankly are going rather mad for it.

    Oh. I see. Timothy Hay. Well, I suppose we could force ourselves to eat it....you didn't forget the REAL food, did you? No...? Ok, well, I suppose we could force ourselves to eat a few wisps...sigh.

    CONTRAST THIS to the response to Perfume Hay:

    Coordinate your watches...LISTEN, LISTEN MEN....is she opening the fridge? She always gets a beverage before she feeds lunch...WAIT FOR IT....WAIT FOR IT....HERE SHE COMES! RUN!!! RUN MEN, RUN!!! HURRRRRY!!!!!! GET OUT OF MY WAY, YOU MORON! I'll KILL YOU...DON'T LOOK AT ME OR...BANG! POW!



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Nov. 2, 2001
    Location
    Packing my bags
    Posts
    31,436

    Default

    DAMN!



    That's why the horses in the lesson barn went hay wire when somebody touched the latch to the feeding room, I just thought they were hungry...silly me...


    GL finding a suitable barn, the BO does not like your horse, things don't go well in the long run.

    And considering that most horses are not easily identified as breed XYZ, I suggest to not disclose breeding of said horse, unless otherwise indicated. Frankly, it does not matter what breed, you got saints and loons, just like BOs, though I have the feeling you find more loons in the latter...maybe if they played well with others, they'd be boarding?
    Quote Originally Posted by Mozart View Post
    Personally, I think the moderate use of shock collars in training humans should be allowed.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Feb. 9, 2003
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    349

    Default

    Sounds so much like a BO where I used to board at. She said that high fat diets were inappropriate for any horse and all warmbloods eat more. She started to charge any warmblood that ate more than 4 flakes of hay (small bales) a day $30 per month for 1 more flake a day. If it was another breed no problem the horse can have as much has as it needs no extra fees.
    Frogs in a Basket. Oh, one jumped out.
    EC Level 1 Coach, ARIA Level 3 Dressage Coach
    www.dressagelife.com
    http://piaffing.blogspot.com/



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Mar. 9, 2006
    Location
    Lucama, NC
    Posts
    5,868

    Default

    Most ridiculous BS I have ever heard! No "breed" or "type" of horse is any more dangerous than any other. However, ANY horse given the right situation can be dangerous, not as in "raving maniac" dangerous but as in a horse is BIG and CAN hurt you! A couple weeks ago I was doing nightly barn check and blanketing when one of my boarders horse bit me ON THE ARSE while blanketing! She just decided she didn't WANT that right then and I got a good big bruise out of it. She has never before, or since bit anyone (of course she got the "I AM GOING TO KILL YOU" for five seconds treatment!). I would never call this mare "dangerous" but I do now keep an eye on her whilst blanketing!



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Apr. 28, 2008
    Location
    California
    Posts
    1,848

    Default

    When looking for a new barn, I'd also be careful to evaluate feeding programs.

    Horses need HAY. It's both healthy, and helps keep them busy. It's also fairly quiet around here at feeding time. I only have three horses in my barn right now (and there are paddocks on those stalls), even they are quiet. Of course they will give you lots of begging looks, but never nasty/screeming/etc.. I have a low quality grass hay that I feed in addition to aflalfa, pellets, and grain. This REALLY helps to keep them busy, and helps them realize that they aren't starving. I've had great luck with that. A barn I boarded at wouldn't feed the horse if it was whinnying or nickering, and he would just leave the bucket of food outside the horse's door until it was quiet. That accomplished NOTHING. Leaving the food right in front of a horse, but the horse can't get to it, just made the horses more frantic about feeding. It was not good.
    Making Your Ambitions a Reality at Secret Ambition Stables.
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  19. #19
    Join Date
    Oct. 11, 2007
    Location
    Andover, MA
    Posts
    5,542

    Default

    One of the nice things about the new barn is that maresy has enough hay -- not quite free choice, but close enough -- that she is much less anxious about food and feeding time. I now know that most horses will be happiest with hay in front of them, and if it's lower quality hay, that is better than very limited quantities of the rich stuff. Most of the horses at the barn will "talk" a little when the feed buckets start coming out, but none of them go insane. Maresy paws a couple of times with a front hoof when she takes her first bites of grain but then she's fine.



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jan. 29, 2009
    Location
    No. Virginia
    Posts
    190

    Default

    Been helping look for a new barn for this mare as well. The only problem with that area of FL is that everything is so spread out and is dominated by the Western folks with some private, backyard barn thrown in (as in, not taking boarders). It's frustrating, seems like the only way to find a place is word of mouth and personal recomondations. There are plenty of big "show" barns on the south side of Jacksonville but then they end up with an almost 2 hr drive each way and that's just not do-able!

    Continuing the search........



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