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  1. #1
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    Question tear of peroneus tertius - anyone go through this w/ their horse?

    curious what treatment besides stall rest your vet recommended and how well the horse recovered.
    http://www.eponashoe.com/
    TQ(Trail Queen) \"Learn How to Ride or Move Over!!\" Clique



  2. #2
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    *raises hand* yep, been there!

    Vet school recommended 2 months stall rest.

    I gave it 2 weeks. Why? Several reasons.
    1 - horse is quiet
    2 - having already severed and extensor tendon a few years earlier, I knew that prognosis for better healing comes with some movement - makes for much better aligned, therefore stronger, scar tissue

    I ended up finding out that if I'd just talked about that with the vet school at the time, they'd have agreed. They just recommend the 2 months to most people because most don't really have a clue about rehab.

    Now, that said, there were xrays done to make sure there was no boney involvement, as in, the tendon tearing away some hock bone. If that had been the case, I'm sure strict stall rest would have been IMPERATIVE.

    My horse did learn to use his leg effectively, if not correctly, and could move around just fine. He learned that antics hurt a bit, so he didn't do (much) of that.

    3 months later I started riding him, and the leg has been fine.

    Well, "fine" in the sense that it healed very well, but that leg has taken a beating over his 11 years - torn flexor tendon sheath, torn fetlock joint capsule at the same time he severed the extensor tendon, and then the ruptured PT. New xrays over the Summer showed changes in his hocks, which have since been injected. It's unknown how much effect, if any, all these injuries had on his hocks in that regard, as the changes are not entirely out of the real of possiblities for a big 11yo WB.

    Is this your horse?
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  3. #3
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    Default

    I did it. NINE months of stall rest. He receovered fully and went back to showing. Never had another problem with it. Mine did it in turn-out.



  4. #4
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    Default

    I wouldn't dream of less than 6 months of stall rest. I think nine is a much better idea. The one horse that I have seen this happen to spent close to a year in the stall and recovered fully with no problems.



  5. #5
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    It takes all kinds

    When my horse had his injury, and I posted here looking for the same type of info, I got some very interesting PMs. One poster, whose name I don't remember and wouldn't give anyway said her horse did this, no bony involvement, and because she didn't have a stall for him, she put him back out with the herd. He moved with the herd, sometimes running with them (giving her a heart attack), but 9 months later she was foxhunting him again.

    Just because stall rest works doesn't mean it's a necessity. I'd never tell anyone to do what I did, or that other person, but since experience was asked for, and given that *vets* have told me that free choice, restricted movement is very healthy and good for healing tendons in the right circumstance, I AM putting it out there as a potential option.

    Heck, this same horse, when he severed his extensor tendon, was up to free choice, small paddock turnout within 2.5 months, and he was rideable in 4 months. I didn't GET to ride him, due to other circumstances, but ultrasound at Marion DuPont 9 months later showed a fully healed, VERY well aligned tendon/scar tissue structure - appeared to have been well healed for several months.
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  6. #6
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    Default JB

    no, not my horse (thankfully! we're still a year and few months into the suspensory rehab and that's enough for now ).

    i never kept my mare in the stall for her suspensory rehab so i totally agree with your approach.

    i'm trying to gather some info for a friend whose horse was diagnosed with this injury recently. vet told her to keep the horse on stall rest for 1-4 months. they're still working out other details involving the rehab. i thought they'd suggest shockwave, since that seems to be the treatment du jour for soft tissue injuries these days but they haven't. maybe b/c they're not sure in which area the tear/rupture is located... i don't know.

    anyway, thanks everyone for the input. she'll sure be glad to hear those happy endings
    http://www.eponashoe.com/
    TQ(Trail Queen) \"Learn How to Ride or Move Over!!\" Clique



  7. #7
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    Default in the cases you've seen, was the tendon

    torn or ruptured?
    http://www.eponashoe.com/
    TQ(Trail Queen) \"Learn How to Ride or Move Over!!\" Clique



  8. #8
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    Ruptured.

    As in, you can extend both the stifle and the hock at the same time. Creep. Eee.

    Your friend does at least need some xrays to make sure there is no bony involvement. That can really, really complicate things in a big way.

    I had asked about ESWT too, for this (as well as the severed ET) and was told both times that it has little value when there is a complete separation of the ligament or tendon.
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  9. #9
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    Default I have two horses that did this...

    First was my old gelding in Jan. of this year-- rupture, no bony involvement, he pulled 3 mos. stall rest, then gradually worked back up to 12 hr. turnout. It healed fine, has some scar tissue now. He was unsound to begin with and just a pasture puff (bad sidebone and ringbone in the front) so I can't say how much, if any, it still bothers him soundness wise.

    Second is a TB gelding I took in three months ago from my lesson barn... he did his the first of March this year (at the lesson barn) and pulled 3 months stall rest there. He, too, went gradually back out and came to live with me in July. We started u/w work about six-eight weeks ago, all walk at first, adding in some trot and we are now trotting a couple of laps each time. He has a "hitch" in his stride and my vet says he is a 2/5 but it is a mechanical gait defect, doesn't cause any pain. I haven't tried any canter work yet because we're still trying to build muscle back up. I think he's doing great considering the fact that he's 25 and had been a school/IHSA horse for 15 years!!!

    It is, as JB said, creepy. JB was a great resource for me when my horse ruptured his back in Jan... thanks again, JB!



  10. #10
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    Default

    Also, tell her to try some SmartTendon from Smartpak, it was cheap and I don't know if it helped but I'm sure it didn't hurt.



  11. #11
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    Likewise, I use Dynamite's Izmine - silica-based - when there are injuries, and so far, things have turned out well.
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by KPF View Post
    First was my old gelding in Jan. of this year-- rupture, no bony involvement, he pulled 3 mos. stall rest, then gradually worked back up to 12 hr. turnout. It healed fine, has some scar tissue now. He was unsound to begin with and just a pasture puff (bad sidebone and ringbone in the front) so I can't say how much, if any, it still bothers him soundness wise.
    Oh hi! Glad to hear he's none the worse for wear

    Second is a TB gelding I took in three months ago from my lesson barn... he did his the first of March this year (at the lesson barn) and pulled 3 months stall rest there. He, too, went gradually back out and came to live with me in July. We started u/w work about six-eight weeks ago, all walk at first, adding in some trot and we are now trotting a couple of laps each time. He has a "hitch" in his stride and my vet says he is a 2/5 but it is a mechanical gait defect, doesn't cause any pain. I haven't tried any canter work yet because we're still trying to build muscle back up. I think he's doing great considering the fact that he's 25 and had been a school/IHSA horse for 15 years!!!
    Not many people deal with one PT issue, let alone TWO! Can you find a rehab person to help you with the mechanical hitch? It's entirely likely that the extended stall rest allowed for adhesions to form, and those *really* should be dealt with, sooner rather than later. But you have to know what you're dealing with (any chance of u/s to see what's going on?) and how to deal with it especially when the horse protests. Even if a mechanical hitch isn't causing pain now, over time, as the body compensates, it could cause other issues that can be painful.

    It is, as JB said, creepy. JB was a great resource for me when my horse ruptured his back in Jan... thanks again, JB!
    Quite welcome!
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  13. #13
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    Default the horse was xrayed and thoroughly examined by the vets.

    b/c it's such a rare injury vets were fascinated to see it.
    i saw photos of that clinical test they do when they flex the leg forward and back and it is frickin' FREAKY!

    didn't realize that it has to be a full rupture for that 'flexion' to look like that. of course it makes sense if it was only a partial tear then they wouldn't be able to flex the leg this way.

    i'm waiting for more info from the friend but in the meantime thanks for sharing your stories and treatments.
    http://www.eponashoe.com/
    TQ(Trail Queen) \"Learn How to Ride or Move Over!!\" Clique



  14. #14
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    I distinctly remember barely getting my horse into the clinic. Vet caught me as I was walking past the entrance. Said, blah, blah, blah, let me show you and then he made the leg go in a direction that no horse should go. He said put it in a stall for nine months and it will either get better or it won't. I don't think I spent a dime that night. But it did heal and the good thing was that he never seemed in pain.



  15. #15
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    Yeah, JB, it's sort of a funny story. The horse was one of my fave schoolies at my lesson barn... was lame in March and was on stall rest, I thought they said he had cellulitis. Around May, lesson barn decides to shut down later in the summer. While talking to the manager, she tells me it was a ruptured PT. I was like OMG, I *just* went through that with my horse in January. She's like, wow, weird. Well, horse needed a home and since I loved him and thought he deserved a nice retirement, plus I knew all about the PT stuff, I took him. It was fate.

    So, my vet was just here doing fall shots and met the new horse for the first time. I tell him about the PT and he's like, wow, that is so strange. He had told me when he diagnosed Trooper's that it was only the second one he'd ever seen in 20+ years of practice and that a few months ago when he went back to the barn of the first horse with one, they had another horse in THEIR barn that had one 5 or 10 years ago. He thought that was really odd!!!

    I didn't u/s it but may eventually do that. I don't have any aspirations with him other than light work so am going to see how it goes. He is 25 after all! Three different vets have seen him and none have recommended the u/s, just a slow return to work. I'm curious, if there were adhesions, how would you fix that? Also what sort of "rehab person" do you mean? I'm totally open to trying stuff on this guy, he is such a great horse and truly deserves the best.

    He was out cantering around in his pasture tonight and looked beautiful-- sound as can be. So we may even get some canter work in, who knows. For now, though, we take it slow and I'm enjoying every minute of it. I'm so fortunate to have such a grand old man in my life.



  16. #16
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    Oh, and to add to what RioTex said, my vet told me that it does NOT cause them pain. They have to learn how to compensate to get around which makes it uncomfortable, but he told me it isn't painful.

    OP--If your friend wants my email, PM me-- I'd be happy to share my experience with her. Best of luck!



  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by marta View Post
    b/c it's such a rare injury vets were fascinated to see it.
    I know! I had Rio at the vet school and the vets there and all the students/interns there were like "oooo, never saw one, only read about it!" I think one vet there had seen one. 1.

    i saw photos of that clinical test they do when they flex the leg forward and back and it is frickin' FREAKY!
    Yeah - way wrong, and not something I want to see again because it doesn't mean a good thing!

    Quote Originally Posted by KPF View Post
    Yeah, JB, it's sort of a funny story. The horse was one of my fave schoolies at my lesson barn... was lame in March and was on stall rest, I thought they said he had cellulitis. Around May, lesson barn decides to shut down later in the summer. While talking to the manager, she tells me it was a ruptured PT. I was like OMG, I *just* went through that with my horse in January. She's like, wow, weird. Well, horse needed a home and since I loved him and thought he deserved a nice retirement, plus I knew all about the PT stuff, I took him. It was fate.
    Awwww!

    I'm curious, if there were adhesions, how would you fix that? Also what sort of "rehab person" do you mean? I'm totally open to trying stuff on this guy, he is such a great horse and truly deserves the best.
    Depends on how deep they are. Myofascial therapy can be *really* useful in breaking up adhesions. So can careful stretching. So can careful massage work.

    He was out cantering around in his pasture tonight and looked beautiful-- sound as can be. So we may even get some canter work in, who knows. For now, though, we take it slow and I'm enjoying every minute of it. I'm so fortunate to have such a grand old man in my life.
    That's awesome!
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



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