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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar. 9, 2006
    Location
    South-Central PA
    Posts
    2,325

    Default tips to combat static when vacuuming?

    It's that wonderful time of year, when static electricity takes over! I love vacuuming my horses, but still haven't figured out a good way to keep the static from zapping them while I'm grooming! I don't want them to get wary of the vacuum, because it makes life so much easier. What are some good ideas to help with this problem?
    Cindy



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar. 5, 2009
    Location
    In a barn
    Posts
    967

    Default

    Try a very, very light spritz of something like ShowSheen all over, and let dry slightly before vacuuming. Or diluted liquid fabric softener in a spray bottle, again - spray very lightly.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug. 23, 2009
    Location
    Long Island, NY
    Posts
    209

    Default

    Bounce, or any similar fabric softener wipes do wonders to keep static down.
    Also helps to apply before blanketing in winter for thin-skinned horses. I've seen some jump (and heard the CRACK of the spark) as their owners pull the blanket off!
    ... It don't mean a thing if it ain't got that Shwung



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb. 4, 2009
    Posts
    488

    Default

    Ok, this may sound like a strange suggestion, but so far its been foolproof. And I've tried static guard spray, showsheen, bounce and the rest. I've tried vacuuming for 5 seconds at a time, and grounding myself by touching metal. (zaps me, but not reliable in preventing zaps to the horse). Finally, I was complaining about this to my husband, and he came up with a solution. Computer geeks have these 'grounding straps' they wear to avoid fatally zapping the computers they work on. Essentially, a metal button contacts your wrist on a velcro bracelet. That connects to a wire that you ground. Now the static gets rerouted down the grounding strap to ground instead of through your horse to ground. In our barn, we have metal guides for the sliding doors that work great as grounds. This has been 100% reliable for me, even when I'm wearing goose down and fleece and its dry as a bone outside.

    This is the wrist strap:
    http://www.geeks.com/details.asp?invtid=WRISTSTRAP

    I just connect that to speaker wire with alligator clips at both ends, but you could use any kind of wire as long as it contacts a grounding element.

    Sounds complicated, but its really not! And I would have stopped vacuuming altogether without it because I was zapping her all the time before!

    Good luck!
    M



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb. 23, 2008
    Posts
    4,266

    Default

    The wrist strap is probably 100% foolproof. I might get one myself!

    My current technique (for blanket removal anyway) is to keep my left hand on the horse, using my right to fold the blanket back, and sliding my left hand along the horse as I lift away the blanket. It seems to help keep the sparks down. I don't vacuum often, so I don't know if it would work there.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan. 14, 2005
    Location
    Aiken SC / Fay NC
    Posts
    5,490

    Default

    So, you put the strap around the vacuum metal part, and ground IT, or you are grounding yourself?

    Confused... sorry.
    FREE TACK/APPAREL ADS: BITS AND BARTER BOARD: http://bitsandbarter.proboards.com/i...ay&thread=5450



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov. 5, 2002
    Location
    way out west
    Posts
    3,502

    Default

    I just drape the lead rope, still connected to the halter, over my shoulder and then vacuum. Then neither my horses nor I get a shock.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar. 9, 2006
    Location
    South-Central PA
    Posts
    2,325

    Default

    I actually already have the wrist strap thingy! I have a computer repair kit that includes that strap! I just might have to try this tonight
    Cindy



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep. 21, 2000
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    1,008

    Default Simple approach

    What works for me is to keep one hand on my horse at all times while I hold the vacuum cleaner wand in my other hand. I only need to do this on days when the humidity here in New England is very low. I am using a mostly plastic Shop-Vac and its upholstery attachment.

    What you are trying to dissipate is the charge that builds up between your horse and the vacuum cleaner wand. By keeping a connection, either with your free hand on your horse or a lead rope and halter, as mentioned above, the charge will leak away. Don't wear gloves. Even though the human body has a high resistance, it's not enough to prevent the discharge.
    ------------------------------------------------------------
    But all the finest horsemen out—the men to Beat the Band—
    You’ll find amongst the crowd that ride their races in the Stand



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb. 4, 2009
    Posts
    488

    Default

    What shop vac do you use? I currently have access to an ElectroGroom, but I'll soon have to buy my own vacuum, and those horse vacuums are expensive!



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar. 5, 2007
    Location
    Sweden
    Posts
    1,581

    Default

    Not having read all and at risk for a repeat. Have you tried dryer sheets? I'm not sure they will work but they are supposed to handle static.

    If that doesn't work. Give your horse a curry all give hinm a once over with a semi stiff brush, then take a damp towel
    (best way is to wet half of a towel, squeeze the water out of it, then fold it doubble (wet half on top of dry half) roll it up and twist it like you would wring out the water of a wet rag, this gives a nice even dampness to the whole thing)
    rub your horse all over with the towel and let it catch all the static dust caught in the hair. Then go over him with a soift brush, if there's still dust or mud in his coat rub the soft brush against the damp towel every now and then to help catch the dust.
    In the end you can give him a quick sweep with the towel again to smooth the hair and catch surface dust clinging on to the coat.


    At home we often also use a soft brush and a curry. For the left side, the soft brush is in the left hand and the curry in the right. Do a sweep with the soft brush and then in the same round move brush it over the curry. The curry will collect the dust so it's not stuck to the brush anymore. It sounds stupid but really works. Do 100 strokes on one side and then pat the curry on the stable floor and you'll see how much dirt and dust you collected!
    Timothy, stop lurking



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar. 25, 2009
    Posts
    645

    Default

    I do the "one hand on the horse at all times" thing...seems to work pretty well.



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