The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Results 1 to 20 of 20
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul. 24, 2004
    Posts
    2,840

    Default Anyone have experience w/ Osteosarcoma/bone cancer in dogs?

    Hi all -

    Just wondering if anyone has had any experience w/ Osteosarcoma (bone cancer) in their dogs...

    Thanks ...
    "When a horse greets you with a nicker & regards you with a large & liquid eye, the question of where you want to be & what you want to do has been answered." CANTER New England



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2000
    Location
    MA
    Posts
    12,983

    Default

    Bad juju.
    My sympathies.
    "It's like a Russian nesting doll of train wrecks."--CaitlinandTheBay

    ...just settin' on the Group W bench.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov. 3, 2006
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    2,171

    Default

    Not good. You may need to be proactive in asking for a plan for pain control with your veterinarian.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct. 21, 2008
    Location
    West Palm Beach, FL
    Posts
    1,477

    Default

    Agreed with the other vets...it's not a good diagnosis, period.

    Amputation, pain control, and making every day count is probably the only course of action, if possible.

    My condolences.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug. 9, 2007
    Posts
    9,262

    Default

    We had a rescued sheltie who had bone cancer he had to be pts when he was 7 yrs old as his pain could not be controlled.

    I had a 3 yr old aussie who had bone cancer in her spine and after surgery even the morphine patches didn't help and I had to take her to be pts.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep. 25, 2003
    Posts
    1,044

    Default

    Our 6 year old GSD has either Osteosarcoma or Hemangiosarcoma (sp?). Test results will be in this week. My vet said both are bad - the osteo is worse. I'm very sorry your doggie has it too.
    "Crazy is just another point of view" Sonia Dada

    www.longhopes.org



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug. 22, 2000
    Location
    CT
    Posts
    2,522

    Default

    My friend's Dobe had it in his front leg about ten years ago. They amputated tho they knew it would only buy some time. He was PTS within the year. In retrospect, I don't think that she would opt for amputation again. Although he adapted pretty well, he had to endure recovering from major surgery and learning how to manage without a leg, probably for just a few month's time.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr. 7, 2005
    Location
    With a dog named Rockstar
    Posts
    2,989

    Default

    Rosijet and OP- So So sorry. It's defiantly bad juju. Spoil them rotten. I took an old Rottie form the shelter that had it. He had a great, great few weeks and finally got to know what the inside of a house looked like. He was stoic, and never ever stopped eating, but that's rare.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun. 9, 2003
    Location
    Alabama
    Posts
    5,537

    Default

    I am so very sorry! We adopted an adult GSD and she was with us for 5 or 6 years. She was probably 4 or 5 when she came to us, so by the time she contracted bone cancer in a front leg, she was an older dog. We did everything we could,but the pain finally wins and you have to give them an out. My husband wanted to amputate but I wouldn't hear of it at her age and I felt it would only spread. Elsa was a truly great dog who we still miss. Good luck with yours --I hope you have some special time.
    PennyG



  10. #10
    Join Date
    May. 22, 2002
    Location
    somewhere between middleaged and dead
    Posts
    1,897

    Default I'm so sorry your dog has this

    My beloved Dal had this. It was diagnosed in the spring of his 12th year. There were cancer therapies I could have done, but I decided I would manage his pain rather than amputate a leg. I got full support from my vet who was also a very well respected Dal breeder. That fall I had to make the hard decision. It was the hardest decision I've ever made and I miss him terribly to this day. But I knew when his pain was too much for him.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul. 20, 2003
    Location
    San Antonio, TX
    Posts
    2,635

    Default

    My parents' Aussie had this, and had to be PTS due to it. She had it in her jaw, which of course affected how she could eat, etc. It is, unfortunately, a terrible and insidious cancer. Work with your vet, and make your dog's time with you as special as possible. Many hugs and jingles to you!
    Jonah 4:4: And the Lord said, "Do you do well to be angry?"

    College football season is over .



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Oct. 20, 2006
    Posts
    917

    Default

    My family lost their relatively young chocolate lab from this. The dog went from a mild lameness to being euthanized within a month. It was a devastating situation.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan. 15, 2004
    Location
    Lancaster, PA, USA
    Posts
    7,741

    Default

    not good. My Chesapeake Retriever had it in a hind leg. Vet said by the time the symptoms were obvious then it had probably already spread. We opted not to amputate/just go with pain control. Light duty meds worked at first, then we worked up to potent stuff and when that could not make him comfortable we put him down. Sadly that all took about 6 months.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jan. 16, 2002
    Location
    West Coast of Michigan
    Posts
    36,321

    Default

    We think that's what my lab had, in her spine. Went from a vigorous, healthy 14yo dog to in severe pain after just getting bumped by my other dog. Around the same time we'd started her on immune suppression stuff for her bad seasonal allergies--the name escapes me, I think cyclosporine--and I will always wonder if that sent the tumor into overdrive. She was in such pain I couldn't stand to see it, and after using up a week's worth of morphine in one night we had her put down within days of the diagnosis. Not a typical story, but the location was really tough as there was no room at all for tumor growth or swelling.

    I'm sorry for you and your dog if this proves to be the case.
    Click here before you buy.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jul. 24, 2004
    Posts
    2,840

    Default

    Thanks everyone... my 11 yr old lab/greyhound shelter dog no one wanted was diagnosed last week with it. He still is acting like his old self - wants to run and play constantly but I have to keep him somewhat quiet as my vet said his leg could shatter any at moment. I think i'm opting for pain control as I can't put him through all the other stuff (chemo, amputation, etc.) just so he can have a few more months - not fair to him to make him go through all that despite me not wanting him to ever go away. I'm going to talk to my vet again this week and make sure we have his pain under control as long as we can and as long as he still has the spark in his eyes.
    Last edited by ryansgirl; Oct. 12, 2009 at 09:27 AM.
    "When a horse greets you with a nicker & regards you with a large & liquid eye, the question of where you want to be & what you want to do has been answered." CANTER New England



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Aug. 9, 2007
    Posts
    9,262

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MsM View Post
    My friend's Dobe had it in his front leg about ten years ago. They amputated tho they knew it would only buy some time. He was PTS within the year. In retrospect, I don't think that she would opt for amputation again. Although he adapted pretty well, he had to endure recovering from major surgery and learning how to manage without a leg, probably for just a few month's time.
    Yes our sheltie Salty's cancer had spread from his leg to his lung, so he only had a few months so we did not amputate.

    My aussie Circe's spinal cancer had eaten part of her spine away, and the exploratory surgery triggered so much pain, that even all of the morphine patches could not stop the pain and I had to pts in the middle of the night.

    So now I think before I opt for surgery on what is really terminal....some times it speeds things along. Pain maintenance is the key, it worked well with my aussie Boo who had lymphocarcoma (2 yrs, lived to be 16 yoa) and not so well with my 2 dogs who had liver cancer (and one had exploratory surgery and died on the table.)

    Sorry OP that all the info on bone cancer is so bad. Hopefully researchers will find a cure some day.

    And make sure your vet gives you the strongest pain control pills and patches around. I had to go to the pharmacy to fill Circe's prescriptions and they ha DEA warning all over them, but they were the same drugs used for human terminal cancer patients. If hydromophine is still being used, get some or whatever is being used now, oxycotin or whatever.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Mar. 10, 2009
    Posts
    5,708

    Default

    My heart aches for you.



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Apr. 30, 2009
    Location
    N. Florida
    Posts
    464

    Default Very sorry about this diagnosis

    My heart dog Lazarus died of this disease. His case was atypical in that we knew that he was NQR but since there was no lameness or discomfort we were at first unable to diagnose. His only symptomm was that he went from being a high drive agility dog to one that didn't want to jump at all. It seemed to be about the landing side and we started with chiro and then had a broad diagnotic at the U of FL. Several months went by until one morning he didn't want to eat. They xrayed and found that he had lesions throughout his body. We put him on pain management but it was only days until we found a lesion open inside his mouth, it had moved his teeth. That was the end, even though he still had bright eyes he was clearly in terrible pain but trying not to show it.

    Something I didn't know until after is that they can bleed out internally with this disease. This happened to a friend who made a quick grocery run and found her dog dead in a puddle of blood when she got home. Not something I would want to experience. So be advised when making decisions.



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Oct. 20, 2008
    Location
    Sunshine State
    Posts
    2,218

    Default

    We had a flat coated retriever with this a few years back. The vet suggested amputation but said it would only buy him a little extra time. In the end, we took him home and had five more happy, active months with him. When we saw that he was starting to have pain, we put him to sleep. His last day with us was spent at a park, playing frisbee and swimming - doing all the things he loved. The vet came to our house and put him to sleep there at the end of a fantastic day.

    A friend just went through the same thing with her rottie and she went the amputation route. It bought her 10 more months but the dog was recovering from surgery and learning to deal with only having three legs for the whole time before she had to be put to sleep... She said if she had it to do over again, she would not put her through the surgery again.

    Hugs to you and your fur kids. Dogs will break our hearts over and over again but we can't imagine life without them.



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Dec. 12, 2007
    Posts
    4,140

    Default

    We're reining in the general pet threads to keep the forum more farm-related--please see the sticky at the top of the forum for more info.

    Thanks!
    Mod 1



Similar Threads

  1. Big dog has bone cancer....
    By winfieldfarm in forum The Menagerie
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: Mar. 23, 2012, 10:50 PM
  2. Bone cancer?
    By doublesstable in forum Horse Care
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: Jan. 28, 2012, 02:00 AM
  3. Dogs with Cancer
    By SuperSTB in forum Around The Farm
    Replies: 24
    Last Post: May. 22, 2010, 10:47 PM
  4. bone cancer in dogs
    By Foxtrot's in forum Around The Farm
    Replies: 65
    Last Post: Apr. 25, 2010, 02:05 AM
  5. Tell me about bone cancer in horses
    By sid in forum Horse Care
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: Mar. 6, 2009, 03:10 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
randomness