The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 29
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug. 30, 2001
    Location
    Purcellville, VA
    Posts
    5,946

    Default Nature abhors a vacuum! What to do?

    I have a vacant stall! And, after my usual month or so of reveling in the lower number, I am back to "odd numbers are wrong". Inverness sounds like she is done with horse ownership, so I have a space. I like even numbers, and 6 works well for me.

    So, my choices essentially boil down to get another boarder OR get a CANTER project from the track.

    I've done both. If all goes well, it is about the same in terms of cash flow in the end. I've had fantastic boarders. All have been COTH friends and have no need to create alters to whine.

    But, help me list pros and cons, in case I've missed a few.

    Boarder Pros: regular and known cash flow, helping hand sometimes, company for riding/drinking/socializing.
    Boarder Cons: potential for crazy neurotic horse owner that is not flushed out in the interview process exists. Stuff in barn

    Resale Pros: no potentially neurotic boarder, no crazy requests (read the boards for boarder wants), if it stays sound, lump sum for cash flow at sale.
    Resale Cons: negative cash flow (vet/farrier/fixed costs of keeping), horses break, selling the horse.

    What else?



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr. 29, 2005
    Location
    Paris, Kentucky
    Posts
    3,200

    Default

    Canter resale pro: the self satisfaction of taking one out of the system and giving it life skills to have a better life

    Can you tell that I'm an enabler???
    Holly
    www.ironhorsefrm.com
    Oldenburg foals and young prospects
    LIKE us on Facebook!



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug. 30, 2001
    Location
    Purcellville, VA
    Posts
    5,946

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Iron Horse Farm View Post
    Canter resale pro: the self satisfaction of taking one out of the system and giving it life skills to have a better life

    Can you tell that I'm an enabler???
    True that! I still get a warm fuzzy when I think of Jules, who was my last resale. She has an awesome, and likely forever, home with a local lady.

    http://www.irealm.org/horseplay/geti...6/IMG_1275.JPG

    Here she was at a local show, which was part of her re-education!



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul. 31, 2007
    Posts
    16,175

    Default A really good bad idea

    You do both.

    1) You get a CANTER project that has the right mind to be made into a safe, first green horse project.

    2) You then advertise locally for a reliable, decent-riding teen, college student or adult who wants to learn how to do this kind of training.

    3) You either get the person to help you with this easy horse and get multiple kinds of satisfaction; You created a new career path for a OTTB who is just too soft and kind by nature to make it somewhere else. You taught one more person how to do this and how to enjoy the OTTB conversion process. And if you found a person who did a nice job with the horse and wanted this kind of project/learning experience, you probably met a nice horseperson and friend.

    I'm not sure whether I'd ask the person for money. Perhaps I'd ask for some help with actual bills-- regular vet, farrier, show fees at the horse's local debut when the time came. I'd emphasize that I'd feed the horse for as long as it took and would keep any "profit" from the sale.

    I mention this because I'd dig this situation. I'm a good, goal-oriented ammy whose homemade horse is just about to be retired. I'm not ready to buy another. I don't want to and/or can't find a horse with the ability to teach me enough to make it worth a lease fee. I don't want to do a free lease if I won't improve my riding somehow. For financial and ethical reasons, I'd really like my next on to be an OTTB. So.... why not learn to pick and make up one of these on someone else's nickle, and with their supervision and help?

    See how you might be able to produce a really great, if unusual hybrid situation like this?
    The armchair saddler
    Politically Pro-Cat



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug. 30, 2001
    Location
    Purcellville, VA
    Posts
    5,946

    Default

    mvp, my head is spinning just reading that one.

    1) You get a CANTER project that has the right mind to be made into a safe, first green horse project.
    CANTER projects are unknowns. And very rarely considered a good "first green horse project".

    2) You then advertise locally for a reliable, decent-riding teen, college student or adult who wants to learn how to do this kind of training.
    IME, this is a very rare person. Colleges are not close, so transportation and related costs are an issue. And, this requires a lot of committment that I've found lacking. I've had many, many young women come and express interest, get a free trial ride or two. Then, the reliability part is gone.


    3) You either get the person to help you with this easy horse and get multiple kinds of satisfaction; You created a new career path for a OTTB who is just too soft and kind by nature to make it somewhere else. You taught one more person how to do this and how to enjoy the OTTB conversion process. And if you found a person who did a nice job with the horse and wanted this kind of project/learning experience, you probably met a nice horseperson and friend.

    I do have an excellent person who is reliable and helps me ride. She leases one of my horses and rides the rest when she wants. She's been with me for almost 5 years, starting on college breaks at first. Even she has a hard time with time committments, but she is reliable and always communicates when something comes up.

    I'm not sure whether I'd ask the person for money. Perhaps I'd ask for some help with actual bills-- regular vet, farrier, show fees at the horse's local debut when the time came. I'd emphasize that I'd feed the horse for as long as it took and would keep any "profit" from the sale.
    Again, IME, if there is no cost, there is no committment. I have yet to find someone who actually wants to do the work that goes with a "free lease". Most only want the fun parts.

    I mention this because I'd dig this situation. I'm a good, goal-oriented ammy whose homemade horse is just about to be retired. I'm not ready to buy another. I don't want to and/or can't find a horse with the ability to teach me enough to make it worth a lease fee. I don't want to do a free lease if I won't improve my riding somehow. For financial and ethical reasons, I'd really like my next on to be an OTTB. So.... why not learn to pick and make up one of these on someone else's nickle, and with their supervision and help?

    Isn't that what we all want? Well, the breed of horse might change, but, I like to ride and train and I'm an ammy, and so if it is on my nickel, I intend to have the fun, not finance someone who doesn't want to do a free lease if it won't improve their riding. I did not get my farm from some benefactor. I have busted my tail for 20+ years to get to the point where I can afford to consider a resale project. I have also not found many horses that I cannot learn from riding.

    See how you might be able to produce a really great, if unusual hybrid situation like this?

    If it wasn't for the fact that most people have THEIR goals in mind, not the horse's betterment and welfare and contributing, then it might work.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    May. 6, 2003
    Posts
    1,888

    Default

    I've had my free lease horse for three years. I cannot begin to describe how much he has taught me. I pay for his shows, his board, his vet care, his farrier care, his masseuse, his training. I would certainly not expect his owner to do so, especially not since he was originally a resale project (yep, OTTB) and she has graciously allowed me to keep him for this long.

    While OTTBs are not generally the crazy freaks they are painted, I also wouldn't necessarily call them an "easy" retraining project. Certainly not one for a beginner. I also, were I SFVA, would not want some person around my barn who expected me to foot most of the bills for the horse (including shows!) while they learned how to "train." There's so much potential there for crazy I can't even imagine half of it.

    mvp, you must be the most amazing rider in the world if you can't find a lease horse who can teach you something.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul. 31, 2007
    Posts
    16,175

    Default

    I'll answer the accusations in a minute.

    But first, let me apologize to the OP. I think my hybrid idea was so whacky or optimistic that it somehow offended. Truly, that wasn't my intention.

    I don't think I'm ridiculously naive about the cost of owning horses, the value of them as teachers, or the potential flakiness of many people. I just wanted to see if I could think outside the usual box of constraints.

    As to the posters who are offended by my statement about not being able to find a horse to lease. I'm just letting you know what I have discovered so far. I know I can learn something from every horse. Before buying my own OTTB in college, I rode everyone else's-- schoolies, babies, dressage horses, field hunters, show hunters and jumpers, polo ponies, plus a reiner and cutting horse. While gaited horses aren't on this list, I'm guessing that between the ages of 7 and 25, I sat on 300 different horses.

    I assure you, I have learned from personal experience that every horse has something to teach.

    For me, now as a W-2 amateur with a newly-retired one to feed, it's about finding riding situation that I can afford and that still lets me have a definite goal. To me, that means improving over fences, doing some formal dressage, or learning to make up a green horse faster than I did with the first OTTB, and the one I bred.

    If it's the desire to have a goal and purpose offends you, then we will just have to agree to disagree. I don't see how that's wrong.

    In any case, I do hope the OP finds a solution, not just a fixed set of problems.
    The armchair saddler
    Politically Pro-Cat



  8. #8
    Join Date
    May. 6, 2003
    Posts
    1,888

    Default

    I think people are getting annoyed because you seem to want to experience having a nice horse without having to pay for it. There was a certain entitlement attitude to the post, if you want the truth. You want a horse who is well trained and will help you improve the technical aspects of your riding? Leasing those costs $$$$. You want to learn how to train faster? Working with a trainer who can help you with that costs $$$$. Showing costs $$$$$.

    I have one horse because that's what I can afford. If you can only afford the one(s) you have, well, you are out of luck unless you can work out some kind of arrangement with someone. Generally, however, those require payment in either money or labor. Nobody is going to give it to you for free.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan. 27, 2002
    Location
    Arlington, VA US
    Posts
    1,359

    Default

    Or you could foster an older horse/pony from a rescue- and get a tax write-off for doing so.
    Appy Trails,
    Kathy, Cadet & CCS Silinde
    member VADANoVA www.vadanova.org



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul. 19, 2007
    Posts
    846

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Iron Horse Farm View Post
    Canter resale pro: the self satisfaction of taking one out of the system and giving it life skills to have a better life

    Can you tell that I'm an enabler???



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug. 30, 2001
    Location
    Purcellville, VA
    Posts
    5,946

    Default

    mvp - No offense taken, but others have pointed out that it was a bit over the top...but that's ok.

    As for fostering a rescue/older horse, I prefer riding-age horses, so it would have to be a CANTER foster, or a CANTER purchase.

    But, dad-gum-it...this was supposed to be pros/cons of boarder vs. resale project.

    Or the easiest. None of the above. Enjoy a light winter and think about it again in spring.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb. 16, 2003
    Location
    MI USA
    Posts
    7,785

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SaddleFitterVA View Post

    Or the easiest. None of the above. Enjoy a light winter and think about it again in spring.
    We filled the empty box stall with straw! Bargin price if we bought all she had. Sure was easy to say, "no room" if we even THOUGHT we might be tempted! If you put something in that vacuum space to occupy it, then space doesn't send out signals that it is available!



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jun. 14, 2006
    Location
    VA
    Posts
    11,372

    Default

    With CANTER, it's somewhat of a crapshoot. So...the cons might be: soundness issues, training issues/time spent retraining, finding an appropriate home down the line, etc. IE: You spend lots of time AND money and it's still a bit of a crapshoot and a lot of commitment. Flipside, it could work out very well and you have the warm fuzzy feeling of helping a horse.

    Boarder? You can afford to be choosy, so you can probably get someone decent in there. They pay their own way. If you don't like them (for ANY reason--horse is an issue, they are an issue), you can have them leave. No major commitment. Upside? $$ and possibly help and possibly a new friend.
    A good horseman doesn't have to tell anyone...the horse already knows.

    Might be a reason, never an excuse...



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2007
    Location
    Maryland USA
    Posts
    1,628

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by goodhors View Post
    We filled the empty box stall with straw! Bargin price if we bought all she had.
    I have 18 empty stalls ... I don't think I can afford enough straw.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Feb. 16, 2003
    Location
    MI USA
    Posts
    7,785

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tangledweb View Post
    I have 18 empty stalls ... I don't think I can afford enough straw.
    Maybe you could put the whole winter hay supply in the stalls? Save you walking very far?

    We got almost 300 bales in there, piled VERY high. So no, I bet you can't afford to fill that many stalls with straw!

    Maybe open a flea market, give each vendor a stall? Would give you regular monthly rental and no cleaning! Ha-Ha Just trying to help you!!



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2007
    Location
    Maryland USA
    Posts
    1,628

    Default

    So far I am relying on self control, but as you probably know, that is a fragile thing easily chipped away at over time.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Aug. 30, 2001
    Location
    Purcellville, VA
    Posts
    5,946

    Default

    I have no need for storage, so I am not going to fill the stall with straw, hay, or farm stuff.

    BuddyRoo has me leaning towards finding a boarder. Now, to figure out where to look. Virginiaequestrian might be good. COTH Magazine is way to big for local/private. Local dressage association? Tell my instructors?

    Inertia is strong.



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Sep. 13, 2006
    Location
    At the back of the line
    Posts
    4,016

    Default

    Boarders are crazy. Ask anyone.

    CANTER cuties are fun, give love, and are a great way to spend time at the barn.

    I think your barking up the wrong tree. JMHO.
    “Management is doing things right; leadership is doing the right things.” Peter Drucker



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Mar. 12, 2006
    Posts
    4,343

    Default

    LOL, you need to find a paying boarder who is not nuts that picked up a CANTER horse that is fun to ride, but they need help with getting it ridden on the sunny 60 to 70 degree days when they'd prefer to help you with barn chores.



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Dec. 13, 2001
    Location
    SE Virginia
    Posts
    1,243

    Default

    ooh! I vote CANTER No question about it!
    see my ribbon quilts at: www.ribbonquilts.com



Similar Threads

  1. Nature vs. Nurture
    By Real Rush in forum Racing
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: Jan. 17, 2012, 06:02 PM
  2. Nature abhors a vacuum!
    By Calvincrowe in forum Around The Farm
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: Nov. 21, 2010, 09:48 AM
  3. Is nature confused?
    By pj in forum Around The Farm
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: Nov. 11, 2010, 10:05 AM
  4. Nature abhors a vacuum - and an empty stall
    By Quin in forum Off Course
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: Sep. 22, 2010, 10:32 PM
  5. Nature vs Nurture
    By fizzyfuzzybuzzy in forum Dressage
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: May. 18, 2010, 09:45 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
randomness