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  1. #1
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    Lightbulb How 'intense' is dressage for you? And, can you ever go back?

    For me, dressage is very, very intense. It's art and athletic and spiritual/soul all at the same time.

    The higher we've gone, the more consuming it's gotten.

    And sometimes, when there are other 'big' things going on in my life, it's like I just don't have... what it takes... to ride. Things like a new job that is both physically (good!) and mentally demanding, family stuff, vet stuff... Sometimes it's just like I don't have anything 'left' to ride.

    Does that mean I don't want it enough?

    I think sometimes it's partly because riding is NOT easy or natural for me. Nothing althetic is. So mentally it's even harder.

    But can you go back?

    I mean, can you 'just get on' or 'just ride?'

    I had a lovely ride on one of the young'uns tonight and was musing on it... because I couldn't even go around the outside of the arena without trying to even up the hind legs stepping, to do a little shoulder fore, to adjust the gait with just seat...

    Is it the forbidden fruit--that once you've had a bite, you'll never be happy with less?

    I find with this batch of youngsters I'm incredibly demanding of myself. If it's done RIGHT it goes so much faster, and the horse is so much more correct, and it's all easy.

    I won't say that takes the joy out of it--because to be getting LY and then SI, halts entirely off the seat, etc. in the first dozen or two rides is pretty darn rapturous.

    But how do you get around being *so* demanding of correctness that you require too much steam to get going?

    The irony in this, (I was thinking while riding this evening) is my web time is down by a LOT. I'm only online right now at work, during down time. So that should give me another hour a day or so (that I used to enjoy in the morning with my cuppa... )
    InnisFailte Pinto Sporthorses & Coloured Cobs
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    Bits are like cats, what's one more? (Petstorejunkie)



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar. 6, 2009
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    South Australia
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    Pretty intense for me, I think! Some people I know call it an addiction...but an addiction can be beaten. I think of Dressage-Queen-ism as more of an incurable disease!

    I can't go on a trail or hoon around a showjumping course without at least TRYING to have a nice straight horse with correct bend/flexion when it applies, I live for the one minute in a 45 minute ride where something you've been working on truly comes together, and I think if you checked my web history, you'd find that at least 95% would apply to horses, and most of that being dressage related.

    I have been trying to just relax and ride for fun lately as I think being so focussed on dressage has diminished my confidence in the other riding areas a bit - but even when I do I'm constantly thinking of the quality of the work.

    Sometimes I find it helpful to hop on a nice, quiet boring horse to JUST go for a trail ride, or JUST pop over a few jumps - I find it easier on a pleasure horse to have fun myself, instead of being worried about progressing and correcting everything on my dressage horse all the time.

    But (and I've just started a thread on cross-training in regards to this) I think it is also important to remember that if you are feeling a bit worn out because dressage requires so much focus and hard physical and mental work for both you and the horse...that the horse may well be feeling the same. So, do the fun stuff. Sure, go ahead and make it correct, but add a bit of variety. Have one ride a week that is a relaxation and fun ride for both of you.

    I suppose it is the same in any obsessive sport, career, university course...it is good to be focussed and driven, but there needs to be time out because otherwise you will BURN out.

    I don't think you can ever go back once you truly get the dressage bug, but finding new ways of making it fun means you can progress while still enjoying your training time with your horse.

    And hey, if it all gets too much sometimes....don't bother riding! Give yourself and your horse a few days off and just have some fun - lead them out for a walk along a trail, give them some beauty treatment, play with them in the field or a roundyard...whatever works for you

    This quote says it all, I suppose (and definitely applys to your forbidden fruit theory!)
    "Dressage: the passionate pursuit of perfection by the obsessively imperfect!"

    I guess the trick is to figure out how to keep the obsession fun for you when it all gets a bit wearing
    Blog posts, updates & videos tweeted to all my followers on Twitter!www.OnceUponADressageDream.com ~ www.twitter.com/dressageblog
    www.youtube.com/cheekywb



  3. #3
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    The OP has garnered extensive support here for her approach for many years, and will continue to do so. She has a way of wording things that guarantees her a great deal of validation here. If she wanted another point of view, she would speak to someone who brings along lots of young horses to the FEI levels. They would say long periods of time off are not safe or productive for the advancing horse.

    No one likes to hear that, they want to believe it doesn't take that. The simple fact is, it does. It takes a regular program, a commitment. Fitness protects the horse from injury, makes his work easier, and makes his work higher quality. Not every horse that is worked irregularly at the more advanced levels will become unsound immediately, but the odds are very, very much against one.

    What I have been told, what I have heard trainers say, many, many, many times, in different ways, is, 'If you love your horse, you will work your horse regularly'. If you love your horse, and you wish to advance, you will have your horse in a program. Or as a cruder trainer often said, LOL, 'every g** da** day, you come out and you do it, that's it'.

    Everyone struggles with making a commitment and continuing to make a commitment to dressage, that is certainly true.

    The people who advance correctly, safely, fairly, stay in a program. There is no getting around that. People try, everyone fights that commitment. A few people step up to the plate.

    Most people quit dressage. They get to a point, and they make a decision. Usually that's second or third level. It's too hard, it requires too much effort. So they quit.

    Because advanced levels are a forbidden fruit they can't do without? No, I don't think so. I think they quit to save face, and to not be riding perenially at a lower level, which for some is embarrassing. Sometimes people simply lose interest. But those who try to advance and then quit because they are afraid failing, don't want to commit more effort and time, or find it too hard, it's more complicated.

    The ones who advance? They make riding a habit. They brush away all the other commitments and the worries and things that keep them from riding, and they simply do it.

    They have one hour a day that they devote to a goal that they see down the road. Nothing deters them. They give up other activities. They make the time. They ride in the winter as well as rest of year. The more time and effort they put into it, the better the results, the sounder the horse, the less resistant the horse, the better quality the work.

    It is really that simple. Making a commitment. Giving up other things. Ignoring the negative thoughts. It doesn't matter what the negative thoughts are. They are simply negative thoughts. Everyone throws up barriers to a goal, rationalizations, justifications, the key is removing the barriers, not in adoring them.
    Last edited by slc2; Oct. 1, 2009 at 07:33 AM.



  4. #4
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    pintopiaffe, Cat - your posts made me laugh but they are SO true! Even if I am just hacking around, fingers on the buckle, I am thinking about the quality of the walk and my seat.

    What a Geek!!
    www.specialhorses.org
    a 501(c)3 organization helping 501(c)3 equine rescues




  5. #5
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    Mar. 6, 2009
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    Glad we're not alone!
    Blog posts, updates & videos tweeted to all my followers on Twitter!www.OnceUponADressageDream.com ~ www.twitter.com/dressageblog
    www.youtube.com/cheekywb



  6. #6
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    Jan. 29, 2002
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    Quote Originally Posted by SLC
    It takes a regular program, a commitment. Fitness protects the horse from injury, makes his work easier, and makes his work higher quality. Not every horse that is worked irregularly at the more advanced levels will become unsound immediately, but the odds are very, very much against one.
    Absolutely.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb. 11, 2002
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    Absolutely it takes a regular program, but for some of us we just do what we can. I have nothing but an outdoor grassy area to ride in, so obviously that isn't going to work for me all year round. Maybe one day when we win the lottery I can have an indoor built, or even a sand outdoor, but for now that just ain't happenin'.

    In the next few months I'm going to have to start busting my a** after I get home from work at 5:45pm (and by next month it will be DARK on top if it!) to get my trailer hitched up, horse loaded, unloaded at my friend's indoor which is right down the street (but I just can't see myself handwalking him down there--too scary), tacked up, ridden, cooled down, untacked, loaded up, go back home, unload, and clean out the trailer. And do that 4x per week at a minimum just to keep him going. Between daughter having homework, house needing to be kept up, etc., it's probably going to be too much. Luckily I have a supportive hubby who is VERY good with taking care of DD and the house stuff, but I don't like to take advantage of his good nature too much. He will get cranky if he feels like he's pulling ALL the weight.

    But I know if I want to keep progressing with him, I'm gonna have to. He's now 4, and there's no excuse to give him the winter off like last year when he was still growing and needed it!

    Yes, dressage is intense, but I will tell you it's a lot less intense with a horse that this stuff comes naturally to!! So I'm really lucky in that respect!



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug. 25, 2005
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    Wink

    Like any ongoing project, dressage is some days a chore, sometimes, getting the breeches on and the boots and the rest of it, then grooming, and tacking up seems like such a nuisance. On those days,I treat it like a trip to the dentist. You don't think about it. You just do it. Unlike that trip to the dentist, once you hit that saddle and start your warm up, everything flows into place. You've come home again.

    Of course, if you're riding more than one horse, you need a pair of long spurs, to keep kicking yourself on.
    Some riders change their horse, they change their saddle, they change their teacher; they never change themselves.



  9. #9
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    Dec. 30, 2002
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    Haslett, MI, USA
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    Dressage is pretty intense for me--I work at it almost every day, but I'm lucky that my job is not usually very intense, so I'm usually mentally able to deal w/the dressage. I do trail ride or jump once a week, and find that I just can't resist asking for some dressage on the trail, whether it be a little shoulder-in, or a trot extension, or SOMETHING. I just can't quite leave it alone. I think my horse wishes I would lay off the dressage sometimes.

    That said, I think SLC was a bit harsh in her response. My riding schedule tends to be 5-6 days a week--my 7-year-old is schooling 3rd level. I know many FEI level riders, and I don't know any one of them who rides "every g** da** day." True, they all ride regularly--usually 5-6 times a week, and they ride all year, but 365 days a year??? No one I know does this. Everyone has families, work, school, other life obligations. I personally know at least 3 riders who are riding anywhere from Prix St Georges to Grand Prix who also have demanding careers for which they must travel. When these people need to go to a conference or something for a week, their horses get turned out to pasture and that is all the exercise they get.

    I know of another person riding at Intermediaire who actually DOES take 2-3 months off in the winter (GASP!). And she has done all the training and riding of her horse since it was a yearling. And yes, she actually does WELL at the Intermediare level.

    So, while I do definitely agree that moving up the levels takes a strong level commitment, I disagree with those who say you need to do it "every g** da** day" !



  10. #10
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    Aug. 25, 2005
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    Wink

    Oh dear ! I missed that line. But then I scarcely read some posts.

    I ride every day, in the sense that there are no scheduled days off in the week. That way when I need to take time off--I do! No guilt.

    But having gotten older, I find taking too long a time off is perilous. My muscles cry, whine and moan after I start again.
    Some riders change their horse, they change their saddle, they change their teacher; they never change themselves.



  11. #11
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    Jun. 24, 2005
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    I get very obsessive and intense about it, which leads to inconsistency because I don't have enough time or money to pursue it the way I'd like (I'm in my 20s, single and self-supporting, extremely intense and erratic job, no horse, owe parents $$ for VERY expensive education so being a working student is so not an option) plus I have no talent for it whatsoever -- I am the opposite of a "natural". I get all kinds of emotional and frustrated, and then I stop riding for a few months, then I start again, on and on. I'm actually working REALLY hard on myself to learn to just chill out and ride for the pure fun of riding (rather than obsessing about whether I'm improving fast enough) and enjoy what I can when I can and be patient and accept that there is a time for everything. Now isn't the time in my life for dressage to be a big part of it, but I believe that my focus elsewhere will pay off in years to come and that there will be a time when dressage will be a bigger part of my life in some way. That may never mean FEI-level competing for me, but that's okay.

    I'm so thankful that dressage can be done until you're about a billion years old.

    I'm also thankful that I also love to run, which can be done on the cheap at pretty much any hour of the day -- running shoes don't eat anything, and they travel well!!



  12. #12
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    Aug. 14, 2004
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    hmmm i agree having a program and sticking to it is important.

    but the times i have had to take time off (broken ribs, horse injured, etc) the horse was BETTER for the time off. sure maybe out of shape, but what was hard is now easy etc.

    so i think time off is beneficial - and we should not beat ourselves up it we are unable to ride for things out of our control (ie broken ribs, horse off etc)



  13. #13
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    Feb. 25, 2005
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    If you are tired and bored of the endless routine, your horses probably are as well. Hacking out, doing dressage in your hay field instead of in your arena, hill work and gallop sets, cavaletti...just to name a few things that immediately come to mind...should all be a regular part of your program and will go a long way to improving your horse's and your own physcial fitness and mental outlook on life. Ingrid Klimke does not spend 7 days a week in an arena.
    Treat Jockey for Spellbound and Smidgeon



  14. #14
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    May. 5, 2006
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    I often try to figure out how I can be so consumed by something, dressage in this instance, and yet still feel as if I am not as committed as I could be or should be.

    I also feel as if my life interferes with my riding. I can tell myself that I am going to ride X number of times in the coming week, and then have that just fall apart when I end up sitting in a vet's office with a cat on one day, a 5th grade classroom for "Back To School" night the next evening and a car playing driver for "Mom's Taxi Service" the next afternoon.

    If I were truly committed to riding I would be out at the barn at 6:30 a.m. if that was the only time I could find in a busy day. But I am generally always in bed and sleeping at 6:30 a.m. and I don't see myself ever being driven enough to not be sleeping at 6:30 a.m.

    I am not athletic at all. I was the girl in P.E. who ALWAYS closed her eyes when swinging at the soft ball. I love to ride, and I love everything about my life with horses (except the bills), but nothing about my riding comes naturally at this point. I am fighting a disability, age related stiffness in general and years of bad habits that need to be undone. Sometimes riding correctly is a huge pain in the ass and really difficult for me, even at the very low level I ride at. But now, almost 2 years after starting dressage lessons, I know how much I don't know how to do and the few glimpses I have felt of correctly riding have made me want to ALWAYS be correct. I want that, but maybe not enough to be a really dedicated rider.
    Sheilah



  15. #15
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    Oct. 16, 2008
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    Central Oklahoma
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    pintopiaffe,

    What you are describing and experiencing is only normal. Every living beings need rest and time away so they can recharge and absorbe what they already knew (and that include horses). That is why corporation offers paid vacations. Researchers have found that employees who take regular vacation are actually more productive. Some corporations even punish employees who don't take vacations.

    In normal days, I ride every day, two horses a day on some weekends. Riding is my addiction and obsession. However, from time to time, I know I need time off and that includes not seeing or touching my horses for days. And guess what, every time when I come back, "both" my horses and I are better, more productive, and enjoy each other more. We both were able to see problems from a new perspective so something that once was struggling became non issue. So, if you are tired, don't be afraid to take time off. Remember, riding is supposed to be fun, not work.

    Now if you take two weeks off every other week, you know your horse cannot progress like this. So what? who is to judge you to which level you are to achive? That is your own decision. As long as you are happy with your decisions, what is wrong with that?

    And no, once you experience the feeling of a balanced horse moving underneath you, there is no going back. That feeling is simply too addictive. We all spend our life time to try to relive that moment over and over. It does not mean we will get it all the time. Nobody can. It is just a goal we all try to achive. That is all.



  16. #16
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    Aug. 26, 2008
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    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    I get very obsessive and intense about it, which leads to inconsistency because I don't have enough time or money to pursue it the way I'd like (I'm in my 20s, single and self-supporting, extremely intense and erratic job, no horse, owe parents $$ for VERY expensive education so being a working student is so not an option) plus I have no talent for it whatsoever -- I am the opposite of a "natural". I get all kinds of emotional and frustrated, and then I stop riding for a few months, then I start again, on and on. I'm actually working REALLY hard on myself to learn to just chill out and ride for the pure fun of riding (rather than obsessing about whether I'm improving fast enough) and enjoy what I can when I can and be patient and accept that there is a time for everything. Now isn't the time in my life for dressage to be a big part of it, but I believe that my focus elsewhere will pay off in years to come and that there will be a time when dressage will be a bigger part of my life in some way. That may never mean FEI-level competing for me, but that's okay.
    Are you me? Minus the owing the $$ since education is relatively cheap in my country. I HAVE a horse at home now, but no access to instructors beyond the once a month that I haul 6 hours each way for a lesson with my coach.

    What you said just really resonated with me. I like Dressage, and I love to ride...but sometimes the external pressures make me hate it. I even like to show...I wish that you didn't get attitude from all sides of the equestrian world about how you're not doing enough for your horse or your riding.

    In a world where an Adult Amateur can be a jobless wonder who rides 10 horses today in a professional trainer's barn...sometimes I just feel lost. Isn't it okay for me to progress slowly? My horse doesn't really give a crap, provided the hay keeps coming.
    Lifestyle coordinator for Zora, Spooky, Wolfgang and Warrior



  17. #17
    Join Date
    May. 7, 2004
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    Linden, CA
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    Quote Originally Posted by Speedy View Post
    If you are tired and bored of the endless routine, your horses probably are as well. Hacking out, doing dressage in your hay field instead of in your arena, hill work and gallop sets, cavaletti...just to name a few things that immediately come to mind...should all be a regular part of your program and will go a long way to improving your horse's and your own physcial fitness and mental outlook on life. Ingrid Klimke does not spend 7 days a week in an arena.
    What you said. It's worth repeating. A regular program does not mean that you have to be in the arena, working intensely, .every. .single. .day. I think treating dressage as an end in itself is to miss the point.
    Quote Originally Posted by HuntrJumpr
    No matter what level of showing you're doing, you are required to have pants on.



  18. #18
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    Oct. 3, 2002
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    Hm... some of you are getting there... I don't think I worded it quite right.

    Not bored--NEVER bored. Almost the opposite. If I never got to ride outside an arena again I'd be happy, but I DO It because it's good for the horse. Probably good for me too, but I used to guide overnight pack trips and 'dude' rides for a living. If I never trail ride again, I'll be fine with it...

    No, I'm still probably not qoing to quite be able to explain... it's like the emotional/mental stuff in life can get in the way sometimes.

    And I'm wondering if I went back to western pleasure, or hunters... or... I dunno, team penning... if it would be less intense? I think I doubt it. I guhttp://www.chronicleforums.com/Forum/editpost.php?do=editpost&p=4413022ess that's part of it--once you've gone from passenger to RIDER... can you ever go back, regardless of the discipline?

    Or is it a personality type that truly sees and is inspired by the 'art', and lives in that manic sort of artistic fugue state... ? NOT that *I* am an artist (yet) but I am SO deeply moved and inspired by dressage at times... beyond 'riding a horse.' Perhaps too much? If you've read Horses & the Mystical Path, you'll get an idea about what I'm trying to get at?

    (and wow... disclaimer/tangent: slc has decided I don't ride... there was some comment in my show post that I hadn't ridden-- I had a wonderful summer once the monsoons ended, with more time off (without travelling) than I've ever had in my LIFE. I think that riding 4-6x/week with the exception of one ten day period since the end of June (and managed to still *work* horses)crosstraining hillwork/cardio sets, LSD and dressage schooles is probably consistent enough. Maybe not. I've even had a clinic post-show, where the work was confirmed as correct... we've since found out there are other issues, but that's not the point. The point is I probably only post when I've got questions or want to commisserate... Poor Jack Sprats Mom gets the same treatment. If we all just posted "I rode today and it was good"... well, that's what a blog is for. Rather, we tend to post the hills or the valleys. The steady trail is rather boring fodder for public abuse... ) </tangent>

    Anyway. I guess I don't know how to ask the question. I just wonder how--or if--you tone down the demanding mental/spiritual/energy (NOT physical work--chores still happen!) or where you find the resources to 'just do it' when other 'big' things outside of Equus seem to want priority?

    And I'm the first to admit, and I've asked several times this past year... Do I want it enough? Maybe the fact that I'm doubting this means I don't! That's ok too. Being able to ride the stuff and train the stuff is two different Universes. I used to be blissfully happy going down for lessons on schoolmasters and playing at the fun stuff. Maybe that's what I need to go back to. Hack around on mine, and pretend I do dressage once a month... <shrugs> Perhaps some of it is the pressure I feel from my teacher. His expectation/belief that I can do it... maybe he's wrong?

    I dunno.

    I'm pretty sure I'm enjoying my second midlife crisis. I ADORE my new job. My interaction with people in crisis is INCREDIBLY fulfilling, joyful, and DEMANDING. I'm new enough at it that it's still also exhausting. Used to be riding was refreshing. These days riding is exhausting too. FULFILLING, but exhausting. I begin yet another facet tomorrow. I'm achieving something I wanted when I was 7. But it's also HARD after a certain age to learn everything over again. (and I keep asking--do you get your brain back after mentalpause? )

    Last week I had one day off, and The Heir Apparent wore a saddle for the first time (sshhh--it appeared to fit. I think if he outgrows it, I'll trade HIM for a horse the SADDLE fits... ) The silly filly worked super well, and let me trim her feet ALONE for the first time in her life. (which is a big deal for her.) The Young Master Irrenaeus never fails to make me smile, it's annoying at times that he learns far, far faster than I do. (disclaimer: yes, I rode/trained other days, that was an example.)

    Thanks for the input. Thanks for reading my ramble. Perhaps I just need hormones.
    InnisFailte Pinto Sporthorses & Coloured Cobs
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    Bits are like cats, what's one more? (Petstorejunkie)



  19. #19
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    Oct. 16, 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by pintopiaffe View Post
    Anyway. I guess I don't know how to ask the question. I just wonder how--or if--you tone down the demanding mental/spiritual/energy (NOT physical work--chores still happen!) or where you find the resources to 'just do it' when other 'big' things outside of Equus seem to want priority?
    Dear, the mental/spiritual/energy is something that will find you, not something you will find. It is something you experience, not something you seek. Relax.... If what you experience is so strong and overpowering, I suggest you to seek a quiet place to sit down, have a good cry (don't need to have a good reason) till you get rid of all the energy that is trying to accumulate on you and weight you down. Then stay away from your horses for a few days. Horses reflect what you have and amplify it and in a "weighted" state, they are not the best media. Nobody say you need to see them every single day. When you come back, you may feel, umm, lighter?



  20. #20
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    Aug. 11, 2008
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    I have to admit, I'm among the 'lazy' crowd who is content at the lower levels, because I learned in my competitive days in the hutners that at some point the pressure to 'move up' takes the fun and joy out of riding for me.

    There are just times when the horse or rider (or both) hit a plateau and then suddenly you get the head shaking trainer, the self doubt, the guilt, and you start drilling. And suddenly it its 'taking too long' to get this or that, and it becomes more about the 'advancement' and less about the 'improvement', and more about getting it done, and less about doing it.

    So, call me lazy, not committed, whatever. All I know is that now when I ride its becaue I choose to ride and I enjoy it whether its a hack on trail, a long and low walk, a good canter transition or just a nice round circle. I may not do it constantly, but I'm very happy trying to do it correctly. And to me, that's the magic of dressage.
    Lowly Farm Hand with Delusions of Barn Biddieom.
    Witherun Farm
    http://witherun-farm.blogspot.com/



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