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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct. 22, 2008
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    163

    Default Spin off (Favorite Clinicians for Jumpers); Favorite WS positions

    Do many big name jumper trainers regularly take on working students and if so who offers the best positions? In dressage and eventing, working student positions seem pretty common and even the very top trainers in these disciplines have working students occasionally or even have well-established ws programs.

    But in jumpers I don't see as many BNTs or even lesser known trainers offering ws positions. Is this because this discipline traditionally attracts and caters to young people from very wealthy families? Or are there lots of positions but I'm just missing them? If the latter, who are your favorite ws employers in jumpers?



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul. 11, 2003
    Posts
    1,400

    Default

    You probably don't hear about them because they aren't advertised publicly. It is all through word of mouth.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug. 2, 2009
    Location
    Osteen, FL
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    Default

    I sought an international working student position with a jumper rider last year. I emailed people that I admired (even though they weren't advertising), sent them my riding resume, and was lucky enough to arrange an interview with Tim Stockdale (who represented Great Britain in Beijing) last year at Olympia and then ride for him a few weeks later.

    I am in England now and start my position with my horse in a week. I shall report back! He's a great clinician as well as rider so I am really looking forward to getting started and learning all i can. I am especially fortunate to have been able to bring a horse of my own.
    Ryu Equestrian & Facebook Page
    Sakura Hill Farm & Facebook Page
    Boarding, Training, Consignment Sales & Breeding
    Osteen & Gainesville, Florida.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun. 2, 2008
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    153

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Roxy SM View Post
    You probably don't hear about them because they aren't advertised publicly. It is all through word of mouth.
    That's interesting. This is different from eventing where a number of BNTs regularly advertise for ws on their webpages or on yard and groom. Why the difference? Hardly anyone has picked up on this thread which makes me wonder if the OP is right in guessing that in the US jumper trainers just want to work with young people whose mommys/daddys can pay $$$$ and that ws are just less common in this discipline.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan. 18, 2006
    Location
    NJ
    Posts
    33

    Default

    Not sure where you're at, but my trainer is looking for a WS and after looking locally he put an ad in this week's Chronicle. He does the GP - winters in Ocala, summers in NJ but he goes all up & down the east coast. PM me if you want more info, or the number is in the magazine!

    Sue



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec. 12, 2007
    Location
    Dallas, Tx
    Posts
    11

    Default

    Jetta - You have a PM.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr. 23, 2008
    Posts
    1,411

    Default

    It is definitely all about who you know (most of the time at least). Sure, there are people that actuall "aply" for WS positions so to say, however, I think the majority of them are had through word of mouth.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct. 29, 2000
    Location
    Southern Pines, N.C.
    Posts
    11,672

    Default

    An assistant to a BNT/R is, by definition, a professional; rules in the jumper world do not let an assistant remain an amateur. So the positions are usually filled from the ranks of young professionals, or those wanting to become professionals, and young professional need money in addition to experience. Talented amateurs have no reason to want the job; they would lose their ammie status.

    These assistants are often young professional riders with demonstrated talent on the smaller A circuits, but without the clients to support them into the big time. By becoming assistants to the big names, they get rides on the up and coming GP stars of the future. If lucky, they will keep the ride on one all the way to the big ring.

    Even if that should not happen, they make contacts, get known and, after several years, have grown enough in experience and stature to go back out on their own in a more successful capacity.

    The biggest BNR/T's do not need to advertise. Assistant positions in their barns are filled through converstations with friends, clients, contacts.

    And, because grooms are more the norm in the jumper world than in eventing, the riders ride more horses per day (up to 8 - 9 horses per day), so there is less need for multiple assistant riders.
    "I used to have money, now I have horses."



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun. 21, 1999
    Location
    Dela...where?
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    3,053

    Default I was a working student for a BNT

    I found my working student position in The Horse of the Delaware Valley. I about fell over when I read the ad and saw who it was for. I had just left my sophomore year of college and was looking to ride and compete more. The stars must have been lined up that day!!
    Quote Originally Posted by JSwan View Post
    Prove it....Otherwise, you're just coming off as a whackjob.
    Founding member of the "Not too Klassy for Boxed Wine" Clique



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug. 2, 2009
    Location
    Osteen, FL
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Lord Helpus View Post
    An assistant to a BNT/R is, by definition, a professional; rules in the jumper world do not let an assistant remain an amateur. So the positions are usually filled from the ranks of young professionals, or those wanting to become professionals, and young professional need money in addition to experience. Talented amateurs have no reason to want the job; they would lose their ammie status.

    These assistants are often young professional riders with demonstrated talent on the smaller A circuits, but without the clients to support them into the big time. By becoming assistants to the big names, they get rides on the up and coming GP stars of the future. If lucky, they will keep the ride on one all the way to the big ring.
    This is why I sought this position, but was unaware that it no longer counts me as an amateur. Can someone please refer me to the rule book so that I am clear? TIA
    Ryu Equestrian & Facebook Page
    Sakura Hill Farm & Facebook Page
    Boarding, Training, Consignment Sales & Breeding
    Osteen & Gainesville, Florida.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct. 29, 2000
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    Southern Pines, N.C.
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MCarverS View Post
    This is why I sought this position, but was unaware that it no longer counts me as an amateur. Can someone please refer me to the rule book so that I am clear? TIA

    Do you ever get on horses at the trainer's barn? Or do you ever do ground work with young horses? Or set jumps or help other people at the trainer's? Does the trainer give you free housing? Free lessons? Free board? Or even, (God Forbid!) PAY you?

    You are a professional.

    See the thread at the top with FAQ. The Amateur rule is explained (once again..................................) in there.

    Sorry -- But I am constantly amazed at how many people still do not have a CLUE about what actions make them a professional.
    "I used to have money, now I have horses."



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jun. 24, 2006
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    1,919

    Default

    LH, pretty sure MCraver is mostly a breeder, so she really may not be well versed in these things. Unless she herself has been repeatedly asking the question, I don't think it's a dumb one.



  13. #13
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    Aug. 2, 2009
    Location
    Osteen, FL
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by magicteetango View Post
    LH, pretty sure MCraver is mostly a breeder, so she really may not be well versed in these things. Unless she herself has been repeatedly asking the question, I don't think it's a dumb one.
    Thank you! And yes, my mother is a breeder, but I am a rider, which is why I was very interested to hear all of this and have now consider myself in full understanding of the rules.
    Ryu Equestrian & Facebook Page
    Sakura Hill Farm & Facebook Page
    Boarding, Training, Consignment Sales & Breeding
    Osteen & Gainesville, Florida.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jun. 24, 2006
    Posts
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    Default

    Sorry just looked at the signature! Love your horses, by the way!



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Aug. 2, 2009
    Location
    Osteen, FL
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    Default

    Thank you!
    Ryu Equestrian & Facebook Page
    Sakura Hill Farm & Facebook Page
    Boarding, Training, Consignment Sales & Breeding
    Osteen & Gainesville, Florida.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Sep. 19, 2002
    Location
    recent FL transplant from IL
    Posts
    7,174

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Lord Helpus View Post
    An assistant to a BNT/R is, by definition, a professional; rules in the jumper world do not let an assistant remain an amateur. So the positions are usually filled from the ranks of young professionals, or those wanting to become professionals, and young professional need money in addition to experience. Talented amateurs have no reason to want the job; they would lose their ammie status.

    These assistants are often young professional riders with demonstrated talent on the smaller A circuits, but without the clients to support them into the big time. By becoming assistants to the big names, they get rides on the up and coming GP stars of the future. If lucky, they will keep the ride on one all the way to the big ring.

    Even if that should not happen, they make contacts, get known and, after several years, have grown enough in experience and stature to go back out on their own in a more successful capacity.

    The biggest BNR/T's do not need to advertise. Assistant positions in their barns are filled through converstations with friends, clients, contacts.

    And, because grooms are more the norm in the jumper world than in eventing, the riders ride more horses per day (up to 8 - 9 horses per day), so there is less need for multiple assistant riders.
    Explained very well here. Why you don't see many adult working students in the hunter/jumper world is they don't want to give up showing in the ammy classes & most situations with a working student "benefits" is going to violate the ammy rules.
    "I'm not crazy...my mother had me tested"



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