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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May. 25, 2008
    Location
    NE of Dallas, TX
    Posts
    422

    Default Dog with bladder cancer.... Anyone know any miracle cures?

    My parents dog (16 yo Lab x Catahoula) Lucy, has bladder cancer.

    She was actually MY dog as a kid but of course they wouldn't let me take her with me when I moved out.

    She has had a wonderful, long life and has been very well cared for. I know the end is near and I think my parents have opted to try chemo treatments so she stays comfortable until I come to visit at Christmas.

    They say she acts very normal, has slowed down just like any 16 year old dog but is otherwise happy and healthy.

    She has had 2 chemo treatments. The first one she tolerated quiet well and bounced back quickly. The second one she seemed to be feeling quite crappy and threw up for about 2 days.

    Has anyone had any luck with some kind of herbal supplement that helps them cope with the chemo?

    Or, better yet, anyone have a cure for doggy bladder cancer? Yeah, I know it's far fetched.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr. 30, 2009
    Location
    N. Florida
    Posts
    421

    Default No answers, sorry

    But 16 is a wonderful long life for a larger breed dog. I'm sorry to hear that your dog is ill. Condolences to you and your family. I hope you all get some more good quality time with the dog.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct. 21, 2008
    Location
    West Palm Beach, FL
    Posts
    1,376

    Default

    Standard of care for TCC (not sure if this is what your dog has) is piroxicam and chemotherapy. Usually the mass's effect on the bladder causes incontinence and is what causes people to euthanize, not the chemo. Stick out the chemo, as it can really add a few good months. Sometimes surgery to debulk the cancer is needed.

    Good luck, TCC sucks but you've done a great job to have a larger breed dog reach 16.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov. 5, 2007
    Posts
    338

    Default

    I'm sorry about the cancer. Why don't you look into DMSO treatments against cancers? Lots of talk about it, and lots of online articles.


    We add DMSO to horses feed to help arthritics, and feed it to the rescue dog who had his back broken - it helps him walk better tremendously. Some articles discuss its affects on cancer. I've never had an experience with it for cancer, but know various people who swear by it. - Its worth a shot.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug. 9, 2007
    Posts
    9,077

    Default

    My humane friend had bladder cancer and had her bladder removed and is doing fine 8 yrs later.

    My cat Davis developed bladder cancer at age 15 and died. I did not do chemo as it has hastened the death of some of my dogs and cats.

    I'd use pain killers as long as the dog is confortable. I had a male Aussie who lived with lymphosarcoma for 2 yrs on pain killers and died at age 16.
    So my usual menthod with dogs and cats in their teens is to give pain killers, and as long as they eat and are not in pain, then we enjoy each day together.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    May. 3, 2006
    Posts
    11,568

    Default

    It's always terribly sad when we face the inevitable death of an animal. Sadly they just don't live long enough. But you need to be assured that your dog has had a very long life for a labrador. She is loved and of course will be missed. I've often said to folks when they say they won't have a dog because of the pain of losing them because they don't live as long enough that the pleasure of owning and living with one far outweighs that.

    My daughter has just lost her much loved elderly chocolate labrador. He saw her through a lot and she's gutted and my grandsons have never known life without him so of course they're all grieving and upset for their loss. But by gosh that dog brought so much fun and laughter and love into their house.

    Regrettably there isn't such a thing as a "miracle cure" for cancer.

    All cancer treatment has consequential contraindications.

    At that age I'd be inclined to ensure the dog had excellent palliative care and pain relief to ensure she ended her days as comfortably and with as much dignity as possible.

    I'd also suggest that you might want to consider going to see her before Christmas or else face up to the fact that you might not see her again. Consider your parents and ensure they are not put in the difficult position of feeling obligated or guilty or responsible for having to try to keep her going till you get there.

    I know from your posting that your dog is your first consideration and letting go is the hardest and biggest thing you can do for her.
    Last edited by Thomas_1; Sep. 28, 2009 at 05:52 AM.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    May. 21, 2008
    Location
    Sonoma County, California
    Posts
    2,511

    Default

    My horse has transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder, and 2 years after diagnosis is still going strong without treatment --- but the lesion has not grown. Corn silk tincture helps on the days when his bladder is a bit irritated. You are not supposed to use it more than a week at a time. I buy it at a health food store and dose according to weight.

    This is an aside, but has anyone ever done any studies about using cannabis in animals undergoing chemo, etc? I know it's used by some human cancer patients.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug. 9, 2007
    Posts
    9,077

    Default

    I thought that dope was to control the nausea from the chemo? THC is supposed to help with the nausea.

    Only suggestions I have is to ask vet about having bladder removed. That's what was happening with my 15 yoa cat Davis when he died of complications after surgery in post op.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug. 9, 2002
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    1,918

    Default

    I lost my first dog (a Samoyed) to transitional cell carcinoma in February 1998. He was diagnosed in November 1997. He was twelve years old.

    We treated him with surgery to debulk the tumor then piroxicam only, no chemo. Keep in mind that chemo may buy you a few months but all animals respond to chemo differently and what one dog tolerates well may make another miserable.

    I was a vet tech for a large referral hospital with a well known oncology department (we had clients from several states travel to us for our oncology services) and I have seen more dogs and cats go through chemo than I was comfortable with.

    At the age of 16, I'd be inclined to do pallative care and keep the dog as comfortable as possible.

    I certainly would not try any herbal supplements (without your oncologist's blessing) while your dog is receiving chemo; you don't know if they may interact with the chemotherapy. There are a few very effective drugs that can be used to control nausea if needed (and appetite stimulants if those are needed too).

    *Hugs*. It's rough to go through this.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov. 9, 2005
    Location
    uk
    Posts
    15,268

    Default

    [QUOTE=mlranchtx;4403231]My parents dog (16 yo Lab x Catahoula) Lucy, has bladder cancer.

    She was actually MY dog as a kid but of course they wouldn't let me take her with me when I moved out.

    She has had a wonderful, long life and has been very well cared for. I know the end is near and I think my parents have opted to try chemo treatments so she stays comfortable until I come to visit at Christmas.

    They say she acts very normal, has slowed down just like any 16 year old dog but is otherwise happy and healthy.

    She has had 2 chemo treatments. The first one she tolerated quiet well and bounced back quickly. The second one she seemed to be feeling quite crappy and threw up for about 2 days.

    none once the bladder goes then there no hope left i had a dog with a cancerous bladdler his growth was as big as a grapefriut had no idea until one day he colapsed in front of me and at the time hubby son and duaghter were out so had to call a mate to get me to the vet as had no 2nd car then but was awful as i had to make the decession there and then to have pts he was 19 never forget it as son daughter and hubby all went out for a judo competition --- and he was gone before they came back and i kept him int eh garage till they said there good byes i buried him the next day as they went school and hubby had to go to work



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug. 28, 2007
    Location
    Triangle Area, NC
    Posts
    6,710

    Default

    bovine colostrum (solid gold makes one)
    you need to boost the immune system too
    www.destinationconsensusequus.com
    chaque pas est fait ensemble



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Nov. 22, 2003
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    7,136

    Default

    Vinegar helps. Probably a tablespoon on food. Corrects the acid balance in body; helpful for ALL SORTS of things!!!



  13. #13
    Join Date
    May. 3, 2006
    Posts
    11,568

    Default

    ^ Get on!

    So you honestly think that vinegar is going to help a 16 year old dog with bladder cancer.

    And "probably a tablespoon" - what is that about!?!!

    I call that false hope rather than merely false information.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    May. 3, 2006
    Posts
    11,568

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Petstorejunkie View Post
    bovine colostrum (solid gold makes one)
    you need to boost the immune system too
    If the poor elderly dog has cancer and is having cytotoxic treatment (chemotherapy) then it's immune system is going to be on overload and severely challenged. That's how chemo works!

    You can't just go giving the likes of colostrum or immunoglobulin etc etc when there's chemotherapy involved.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Oct. 21, 2008
    Location
    West Palm Beach, FL
    Posts
    1,376

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas_1 View Post
    If the poor elderly dog has cancer and is having cytotoxic treatment (chemotherapy) then it's immune system is going to be on overload and severely challenged. That's how chemo works!

    You can't just go giving the likes of colostrum or immunoglobulin etc etc when there's chemotherapy involved.
    Doesn't matter anyway. The gut is not permeable to absorbing large immunoglobulins unless it's a neonate.

    Most likely it would give the dog wicked bad diarrhea!

    People, there are no miracle cures.

    Here's how it goes:
    -surgery to debulk the mass
    -piroxicam
    +/- chemotherapy

    other than that, you're venturing into voodoo magic...and risking harming the dog more than helping it.



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