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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul. 20, 2008
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    Default Bringing an ex-broodmare back into work...

    My mare, Daisy, has been a broodmare for atleast the past 6 six years. She's had 4 foals that I know of, but there is a possibilty that she had more (is there anyway to look up how many she's had?). She's a TB who raced a few times and I don't know if she was re-started and trained in something after the track. I lunged her the other day, she knows w/t/c/halt - so maybe she is trained?

    Anyway, she has a 4 1/2 month old with her now who will be weaned very soon hopefully. My question is how long will it take her to lose the stretched out/baby belly look? Will she even lose it? I've never been around broodmares coming back into work. She's also lacking muscle on her back, my trainer (who gave her to me) said it's just from having so many foals and the lack of work. So, what's the best way to start building them up? I was planning on lunging with side reins.

    She's older - so she'll just hopefully do some trail riding and maybe low level dressage. There is a chance she'll be bred one more time, but I would like to see her in better shape before then...

    I can put a picture up if it helps.
    But I'm just wondering if she'll go back to looking "normal" with some exercise.
    Last edited by mybeau1999; Sep. 19, 2009 at 05:51 PM. Reason: typo
    BDC



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul. 30, 2005
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    England
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    Default

    Lots of slow work is the best way to start bringing her back up. Start off with shorter sessions, and increase the time quite slowly to give her chance to build strength. Lunging her a few times a week will help too- but I wouldn't use the side reins until she's stronger. Walk her up hills if you have any! I doubt that she'll ever fully lose the foal belly, but toning her muscles will help.
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  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec. 18, 2006
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    NY
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    Default

    I posted on the other thread earlier but your situation is just like mine. I bought my mare still in foal from my neighbor who bred her; I didn't even know if she'd be rideable but I liked her and was worried where she'd end up because they didn't want to breed her again. All in all she's been really easy to bring back into work; I was a bit nervous to ride her at first so I had a pro do a lot of the early rides, but now I know I could have ridden her myself. I just had no idea if she'd be spooky or bolt, but she's quite well mannered.

    I agree that light lunging and walking under saddle if you're ready are a great way to start. I had asked my vet about side reins to help develop muscle and he said no - he said "horses are rear-wheel drive only"....start at the back. I think there is definitely a place for side reins but probably only after she's gained some fitness first.

    Good luck!



  4. #4
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    Thanks! I think we'll stick to lunging throughout the fall, then maybe add side reins if she's ready/needs them. Hopefully I'll hop on her this winter/next spring.

    Did you have you older girls on any supplements to help them out with the new work load? I was considering a joint supp - just MSM or something.
    BDC



  5. #5
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    Dec. 18, 2006
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    My mare was *only* 12 when we started work and only 14 now, so she wasn't on any supplements, and still isn't. I'd be more inclined to make the decision on supplements based on your mare's current age & condition, and not the increased workload per se. My vet isn't big on joint supplements; he said only a few really seem to show that they help at all, so do some research before you spend too much.

    Have fun!



  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by S1969 View Post
    My mare was *only* 12 when we started work and only 14 now, so she wasn't on any supplements, and still isn't. I'd be more inclined to make the decision on supplements based on your mare's current age & condition, and not the increased workload per se. My vet isn't big on joint supplements; he said only a few really seem to show that they help at all, so do some research before you spend too much.

    Have fun!
    I agree with this.
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  7. #7
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    Gotcha, I'll see how she does. Just figured that since she's 16 it couldn't really hurt..
    BDC



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec. 6, 2007
    Location
    Michigan
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    I bought a mare when she was 12 years old and already had 7 foals. I kept her for 5 more years also used as a broodmare. I then sold her as a riding horse. Today, with her new rider, she looks trim and toned and taking home the blues at 1st and 2nd level!!
    Don't give up on those ladies!
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  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct. 16, 2002
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    When I was a kid, Mr. Robert Lippitt Knight, who was the breeder of all the Lippitt Morgans, asked me to get Lippitt Rebecca, a broodmare, ready for the GMHA 100 Mile Trail Ride.

    This was in 1959, I was 17, and I didn`t know what a hard thing I was getting into.

    Rebecca had weaned a foal the prior fall, and I started actually riding her in May, and she`d been first ground driven, then driven, about 3 days a week since about mid March, when the dirt roads had thawed.

    Anyway, after 4 months of gradually increasing roadwork, we finished the 100 mile successfully, but tired.

    She later had more foals, and 50 years later, her descendents are still out there.

    So it can be done. In her favor, she was small and correct, with a strong, balanced trot, like all those old Lippits, and she was tough.

    Looking back, from a half century perspective, I think it was asking too much. Two full years of buildup would have been ideal, not 6 months.



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