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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul. 27, 2009
    Posts
    22

    Default Freaking Out!!!!!!!!

    Ok, so... My horse had his feet done yesterday. My mom was there with the farrier yesterday and after he was done getting his shoes on and everything they let my horse loose and he was fine. Today I went to the barn and when I took him out of his stall he was very ouchy on his front right foot. He is a big mover and he was taking very short steps with his front right, and was not compfortable!

    His toes were a little long before this so I dont know if the farrier just cut too much toe off. But I am freaking out because we have regionals for dressage coming up oct 1-4, and I dont know what to do! The farrier is coming back out tomarrow to see whats going on. But my horse is on half glue on shoes, with four nails. So we might put him on the equicast shoe, but otherwise i dont know what to do!!!!

    Anyone have any tips to help grow out a toe (if thats what it is), or how to make him more comfortable?

    And does anyone know of a good corrective farrier, or anything because he is a very VERY special horse, who means alot to me and who could be my next FEI horse, so if anyone knows of a good farrier or some tips that would be great!

    I am in the Illinois, in the chicago land area.

    Thank you!!!!



  2. #2
    Join Date
    May. 20, 2005
    Location
    Desert Southwest
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    6,280

    Default

    It may be a "hot nail". Hopefully the farrier can fix that and everything's good in short order.

    I'm not in Chicago, so no help with a specialist farrier.

    Hope all's well soon and you have a good time at regionals!



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug. 25, 2008
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    2,067

    Default

    It's often a hot nail, and can be easily fixed - Mac and I had one of those right before our first recognized show, and I freaked! The farrier came out, pulled and reset the shoe, and he was miraculously fine after a couple of days. Good luck! If it's short toes you do have a bit of time for him to recover, but in any case, best of luck at Regionals!



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug. 28, 2007
    Location
    Triangle Area, NC
    Posts
    6,710

    Default

    Breathe.
    you have time to get him sorted out, no worries
    www.destinationconsensusequus.com
    chaque pas est fait ensemble



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug. 25, 2005
    Location
    Northeast
    Posts
    10,423

    Exclamation

    Chill!

    Nothing was ever cured by running in circles. I hope that your horse is on a regular hoof care schedule every 5-6 weeks, and you have the same farrier each time. One who is familiar with your horse's idiosyncracies of foot. If you don't have such a program, whyever not?

    The time to look for a good farrier is before a disaster, not to fix one.!!!!!
    Some riders change their horse, they change their saddle, they change their teacher; they never change themselves.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug. 7, 2005
    Location
    Southern California/Muenchen
    Posts
    2,987

    Wink

    surely the farrier can fix it and you may have to soak the foot in Epsom salt for a couple of days to get the inflammation out- that's all- unless he totally butchered him- which should be visible to the naked eye...
    "the man mite be the head but the woman is the neck and the neck can turn the head any way she wants..." -smart greek woman



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct. 2, 2003
    Posts
    614

    Default

    At some point, it will not help you now, consider taking some radiographs of the hoof. You can see things like sole depth that can help the farrier know how to shoe your horse. For both of my horses I have had x-rays done and the vet and farrier get together to discuss the best way to shoe the horse (vet and farrier work really well together). If you really think the horse is FEI then it might be worth it. Farriers are not all knowing, radiographs can help.

    For now, sounds like it is a hot nail. I had my mare 3 legged lame 2 weeks before a show. After a complete work up at the vet (x-rays, ultrasound, the whole bit) she blew out a huge heel abcess. Was fine 2 days later. Best of luck at Regionals!! Sending some positive energy your way.

    Let us know how it goes.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2000
    Posts
    24,408

    Default

    If the horse doesn't get a lot of training in due to a sore foot, he shouldn't go to regionals. If he is actually still sore by time of the regionals, he shouldn't go. There are always other regionals. It's not right to push a horse into going when he's not 100%. That's just how it is with horses sometimes. A horse shouldn't be left long in the foot and then cut down alot. Keep regular farrier schedule and don't let him get long. If it's a bad nail, and the farrier comes back and takes care of it, sometimes it takes a couple days to heal up, sometimes longer.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec. 1, 2005
    Location
    FL
    Posts
    721

    Default

    i second the epsom salt soak...twice a day...put a bunch of salt in warm water and soak for 15 minutes. you can also soak him in ice water as well for pain relief.
    www.pinkhorseperformance.com
    Begin as you mean to continue.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2000
    Posts
    24,408

    Default

    I would get the farrier back first, before soaking. Once had a farrier tell me a customer soaked the horse's foot so much she introduced an infection where all there was was a nail bind, and softened up and swelled up the tissues so much he couldn't see what was happening and couldn't pare out the area, the often say not to soak the foot til AFTER they have pared it out and opened the area(if need be), otherwise it's more difficult to do the work, and have even been told soaking does more harm than good, creates a climate where many organisms thrive.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep. 21, 2005
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    490

    Default

    Sounds like the horse didn't have good feet to start with I'm sure the farrier has a hard time placing the nails. Like most others said it's probrably a hot nail he should be fine in 3 weeks. A horse that's been in consistent training could easily not work for a couple weeks and then work the last week before the show if all that's necessary.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    May. 20, 2005
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    Desert Southwest
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    6,280

    Default

    Don't panic!



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2000
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    Default

    I wouldn't assume that. I know professional trainers who would (and have) absolutely refuse to show a horse under those circumstances. I wouldn't, in most cases, do such a thing.

    It really depends on the level. I think that the higher the level, the LESS likely it is a good idea. I would not even consider doing so with a youngster, and nothing over first level. One simply needs to practice things right before a show. The horse loses suppleness and specialized skills very quickly.

    And how demanding/competitive the show is, as well as how the individual horse responds to no work for 3 weeks and then getting worked for only a week before a show.

    I don't think there are many horses that really would perform well under those circumstances - some would do very badly. Not everyone wants to go to a show and do poorly, and score badly.

    And depending on the injury, it just may not be good for the horse's overall welfare to be shipped, to stand in a strange stable where he might not be resting as he would at home, work on different footing, after 3 weeks of rest with that specific injury.

    Besides that, after 3 weeks of no work, one doesn't go right back to full work. Most likely that week would consist of a day or two of careful walk work under saddle and a little light longeing to feel out if the foot was alright. A week after a 3 week layup might consist of only ONE ride of actual work.

    There are always other shows. No one show is really THAT important. One has to not get carried away in the desire to show.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jun. 7, 2006
    Posts
    8,646

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by slc2 View Post
    I wouldn't assume that. I know professional trainers who would (and have) absolutely refuse to show a horse under those circumstances. I wouldn't, in most cases, do such a thing.

    It really depends on the level. I think that the higher the level, the LESS likely it is a good idea. I would not even consider doing so with a youngster, and nothing over first level. One simply needs to practice things right before a show. The horse loses suppleness and specialized skills very quickly.

    And how demanding/competitive the show is, as well as how the individual horse responds to no work for 3 weeks and then getting worked for only a week before a show.

    I don't think there are many horses that really would perform well under those circumstances - some would do very badly. Not everyone wants to go to a show and do poorly, and score badly.

    And depending on the injury, it just may not be good for the horse's overall welfare to be shipped, to stand in a strange stable where he might not be resting as he would at home, work on different footing, after 3 weeks of rest with that specific injury.

    Besides that, after 3 weeks of no work, one doesn't go right back to full work. Most likely that week would consist of a day or two of careful walk work under saddle and a little light longeing to feel out if the foot was alright. A week after a 3 week layup might consist of only ONE ride of actual work.

    There are always other shows. No one show is really THAT important. One has to not get carried away in the desire to show.
    So, conversely, you believe that during the three weeks before a show, the horse needs to be drilled in the arena daily in order to be ready?

    Well prepared horses do perfectly fine even (or even especially) after a little time off.
    On a truly prepared horse, I find the best strategy is to lighten the load in the week or two prior, and go on trail rides on the day or two before shipping out, so they are rested mentally and physically and ready to go.

    My dressage trainer in Florida lets people try her sale horses in the day or two before a competition (I-2). Her philosophy? "I'm a trainer, and my horses are well prepared. There is nothing you can break in 30 minutes that I can't fix in 3."

    The opposite strategy is of course to do Serious Schooling the week before, so the horse is fried before he even gets on the truck.
    You do not want to spend your best ride in the practice ring at home, and it is not necessary or even advisable to adhere to a rigid schedule just so that you can feel serious enough.

    Show prep happens 6 months before the show, not six days. If there is something you desperately feel needs to be addressed in the 3 weeks prior to a show it is time to drop down a level.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    May. 20, 2005
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    Desert Southwest
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    6,280

    Default

    Dittos, Meupatdoes!



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2000
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    Default

    No, as usual, meupatdoes, I don't believe any of the stuff you are accusing me of believing. Nor does any of it follow logically on what I said, not by the wildest stretch of any imagination.

    Just because I don't believe in always taking a horse after an injury and three weeks off and one week of work to a show, doesn't mean I ALSO believe that all their schooling should take place in three weeks before the show.

    You know that's a ridiculous statement, it doesn't follow logically with what I said, and is completely illogical as far as training principles go.

    To be perfectly honest, I know of no other place than here, that someone would argue that any or all cases of this should go to a dressage show after 4 weeks of no work and a few rides right before the show. Even suggesting that this is a good idea - I don't know. It could only happen here.

    I think the idea of not taking a horse to a show after such a situation riles people up, because they want to take a horse to a show after 3 weeks off, or because they have done so in the past. Why? My guess is that they think that little horse show is just that important, that they don't even stop to consider. It's always fine! No problem! STFU anyone who suggests it could ever be different in even a single case!

    What I said is that I would not assume it was a good idea to do it. And I stand by that.

    Training of horses past a certain low level of dressage expectation, involves a response to the aids and suppleness, not just basic fitness. The basic fitness takes a very long time to establish and may be retained for a time in some types of riding and some types of measurement; there is no indication that that happens in dressage, and no research. But regardless if some fitness is retained, the suppleness, the response to the aids - that changes in days. The harmony and response between horse and rider, changes in days.

    Depending on how physically demanding the test is, I would be very uncomfortable with having an inconsistent training program for a very, very long time, in fact, before a competition.

    And the idea that it logically follows in anyone's mind, least of all mine, that the horse then 'should be drilled in the ring every day for three weeks' is also ridiculous.

    And I always post a very, very conservative statement when anyone suggests they are going to suddenly change their horse's work to make a close deadline, or assumes they can bring a horse along with a less consistent program or on less work, or in less time, than makes sense. I am also not in favor of 'burning out' horses by drilling. I just came back from a hack and that is something even the top horses in the world need and get.

    At the same time, I think a great many people assume dressage requires very little fitness or consistent work of horse OR rider, and I see a great many red faces and overheated, overstressed horses at clinics and shows because of that.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Nov. 9, 2005
    Location
    uk
    Posts
    15,268

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by slc2 View Post
    No, as usual, meupatdoes, I don't believe any of the stuff you are accusing me of believing. Nor does any of it follow logically on what I said, not by the wildest stretch of any imagination.

    Just because I don't believe in always taking a horse after an injury and three weeks off and one week of work to a show, doesn't mean I ALSO believe that all their schooling should take place in three weeks before the show.

    You know that's a ridiculous statement, it doesn't follow logically with what I said, and is completely illogical as far as training principles go.

    To be perfectly honest, I know of no other place than here, that someone would argue that any or all cases of this should go to a dressage show after 4 weeks of no work and a few rides right before the show. Even suggesting that this is a good idea - I don't know. It could only happen here.

    I think the idea of not taking a horse to a show after such a situation riles people up, because they want to take a horse to a show after 3 weeks off, or because they have done so in the past. Why? My guess is that they think that little horse show is just that important, that they don't even stop to consider. It's always fine! No problem! STFU anyone who suggests it could ever be different in even a single case!

    What I said is that I would not assume it was a good idea to do it. And I stand by that.

    Training of horses past a certain low level of dressage expectation, involves a response to the aids and suppleness, not just basic fitness. The basic fitness takes a very long time to establish and may be retained for a time in some types of riding and some types of measurement; there is no indication that that happens in dressage, and no research. But regardless if some fitness is retained, the suppleness, the response to the aids - that changes in days. The harmony and response between horse and rider, changes in days.

    Depending on how physically demanding the test is, I would be very uncomfortable with having an inconsistent training program for a very, very long time, in fact, before a competition.

    And the idea that it logically follows in anyone's mind, least of all mine, that the horse then 'should be drilled in the ring every day for three weeks' is also ridiculous.

    And I always post a very, very conservative statement when anyone suggests they are going to suddenly change their horse's work to make a close deadline, or assumes they can bring a horse along with a less consistent program or on less work, or in less time, than makes sense. I am also not in favor of 'burning out' horses by drilling. I just came back from a hack and that is something even the top horses in the world need and get.

    At the same time, I think a great many people assume dressage requires very little fitness or consistent work of horse OR rider, and I see a great many red faces and overheated, overstressed horses at clinics and shows because of that.

    slc2 if it can be addressed asap by the farrier between now and then she should be fine
    ie if a nail has been in the wrong place sounds like it then the horse has ample time to be ready


    op-- get your farrier out to redo them if your still not happy change him
    go here for advice www.horseshoes.com its full of farriers if you still worried then call the vet and the farrier together then they can go by xrays as what to do to make him comfy and then it will depend on the out come of that as if your ready or not



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jul. 27, 2009
    Posts
    22

    Default

    Thanks everyone!

    The farrier was supposed to come out this morning, but had to reschedule for later today. So i am going to meet him later this evening. I went to the barn this morning to check on him, and he wasnt dead lame. Like I said he has big gaits, and has a big walk. WHen i took him out of the stall he was just not taking as big a stride with the right front as usual.

    So i am hoping that it is a hot nail, not that he cut his foot too short. If he did take too much toe of I think i am going to put him back on the equicast.

    I am just freaking out because this happend last year, where a different farrier cut him WAYYYYY to short. He was off for a while, but the equicast made a difference. It doesnt seem like he is as sore as last time, but I am getting so pissed off that this keeps happening.

    And about showing. My guy is pretty good about being off for a while and still knowing what to do. If this is a big problem where it is going to take 3 weeks to fix, then I am not going to take him. But if the problem resolves itself and I have at least a week and a half to work with him then he will be fine. The show grounds are close, and if he can do it then i will take him and only ride the two classes.



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2000
    Posts
    24,408

    Default

    If this has happened before, I would be concerned that something other than what you think is happening. Horses aren't supposed to go lame after they are trimmed. Either the farrier is having problems trimming the horse or there is someething wrong with the horse that needs attention.



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jul. 19, 2001
    Posts
    8,542

    Default

    Talk to your vet and your farrier and stop listening to drama queens on the net who have no idea what is going on with your horse.

    Sounds like it COULD be a close nail. No need to panic yet. please don't let the uninformed doom and gloomers get to you.

    Why someone here who is neither a vet nor a farrier nor do they know your horse would start telling you you can't go to the Regionals at this point is just beyond bizarre..Good luck with the farrier. if it's a close nail, the horse should be fine except there is the possibility of an abscess.

    A bit early to panic, though.



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