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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec. 5, 2007
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    175

    Default the 'slow feeding movement' (??)

    This was sent to me by some friends who fully support barefoot only ( I have a few horses barefoot and a few that are shod so no flaming me for mentioning barefoot.)

    http://swedishhoofschool.com/feeders.htm

    Not sure what to think althought I do think that I am getting tired of all the new 'movements' in horse care and training. Has anyone heard of this or do this type of feeding? I agree that horses are grazing animals and in a perfect world they should be grazing all day but this seems a bit odd and possibly a bit dangerous.

    Thinking I want to start a new 'movement' but not sure what!



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun. 10, 2009
    Location
    NH
    Posts
    536

    Default

    My guys both have nibblenets, but only for at night so they have their hay a bit longer since they are gobblers During the day grass and flakes outside without the nets.

    I don't understand at the bottom of that page the "Founder Trap" thing? and how with it they had horses "Eat themselves to Founder"? I've never used round bales but I am a big believer in free choice hay if appropriate for the horse.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug. 28, 2007
    Location
    Triangle Area, NC
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    6,707

    Default

    My horse would say "f" it and never eat hay if i restricted his munching to that.
    www.destinationconsensusequus.com
    chaque pas est fait ensemble



  4. #4
    Join Date
    May. 11, 2009
    Location
    Dairyville USA
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    2,979

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Petstorejunkie View Post
    My horse would say "f" it and never eat hay if i restricted his munching to that.
    Mine would find a way to effectively demolish this sort of aberration, eat the hay, poop inside it, and never speak to me again.
    Michael: Seems the people who burned me want me for a job.
    Sam: A job? Does it pay?
    Michael: Nah, it's more of a "we'll kill you if you don't do it" type of thing.
    Sam: Oh. I've never liked those.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec. 5, 2007
    Posts
    175

    Default

    yes, mine too. One would spend all day trying to destroy the hay bag/box rather than eat!

    I also do not understand the one called the founder trap ( or whatever they say about it) It looks like the other one on the site that is empty.

    I wish mine would munch all day. Each horse has there own stall with large run so no need to worry about someone stealing their meal but only one is a nibbler. The rest finish up meals somewhat quickly



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun. 22, 2006
    Location
    SF Bay Area, CA
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    Default

    Not sure where the concern about a "new movement" is coming from.

    Horses in stalls/confined areas get bored easily. Horses that are laid up from injury, especially. Horses tend to scarf down thier hay feedings in less than 30 minutes.

    What's wrong with trying to draw it out a little longer? The horses love to "graze" and "nibble" at these haynets and it really does stimulate them, so they aren't bored.

    It's also better for thier system to have hay being processed on a more continuous basis (versus a flake or two inhaled in the morning, and another batch inhaled in the evening)

    We have the small hole haynets and love them. Our horses are out 24/7 together. They are fantastic when we go camping so the horses aren't as bored when stuck in small pens.

    Last time we used the small-hole-haynets for our 2 mares, everyone else at the campground was asking about them. Their horses were inhaling and or peeing, pooing all over thier hay. Wasting, etc. They loved how our mares just quietly nibbled on thier hay with no waste and it lasted hours.

    The BEST reference site for "Slow Down Feeding" is this one:

    http://paddockparadise.wetpaint.com/page/slow+feeders
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Equine & Pet Portrait Artist
    www.elainehickman.com
    **Morgans Do It All**



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb. 13, 2005
    Location
    Columbus, OH
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    6,801

    Default

    Like any movement in horse care, it is *potentially* dangerous but also *potentially* useful for some situations. We could say the same about poorly shod/poorly barefoot trimmed horses versus well shod/well trimmed horses.

    Unlike some of the whacked out movements we've seen lately in horsemanship, at least slow feeding has some logic to it. It combats horsey boredom, it is more in line with their natural metabolism (although I would LOVE to see an actual scientific study on that), and it combats hay waste at a time when hay is outrageously priced. Even if you don't buy the first two advantages, that last one is huge.
    ________________________
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  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2003
    Location
    NorthEast
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    24,484

    Default

    Huh, I think it's neat that they've invented an actual trap for founder. Looks like a live trap...so I wonder what they do with the founder after they've trapped it? I certainly wouldn't want someone to come near my place and re-release a trapped founder!
    You jump in the saddle,
    Hold onto the bridle!
    Jump in the line!
    ...Belefonte



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb. 19, 2004
    Location
    New Hampshire
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    Default

    I have to admit that I use the small mesh hay nets for my three. I have four of them placed around the turnout. We do not have grass and my hoovers were eating their 10 pounds of hay in the morning at lightening speed. With the small hay nets the hay lasts them a lot longer which is nice because I am not available to give them more hay in the afternoon. They get another 10 pounds each at night.
    Missouri Fox Trotters-To ride one is to own one

    Standardbreds, so much more then a harness racing horse.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec. 13, 1999
    Location
    Greensboro, NC
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    35,575

    Default

    Great, and live-saving for some horses; a good way to starve others.

    If I had to confine my WB gelding and feed him only hay, I'd have to do something of this nature. If I had to do that with my TB mare, she'd waste away to nothing.

    Again, like many things, it's a great concept, but only wiggy fanatics will claim it's a necessity for all horses
    ______________________________
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  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2003
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    NorthEast
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    Default

    Again, like many things, it's a great concept, but only wiggy fanatics will claim it's a necessity for all horses
    Yup, totally agree!
    You jump in the saddle,
    Hold onto the bridle!
    Jump in the line!
    ...Belefonte



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jul. 30, 2005
    Location
    England
    Posts
    10,513

    Default

    I can't open the web page- can someone clue me in?
    Horse Show Names Free name website with over 6200 names. Want to add? PM me!



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Sep. 25, 2005
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    The Land of the Frozen
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    Default

    A great tool for some horses in some circumstances, and a heap of unnecessary propaganda for other horses in other situations. Two of my horses eat from small hole nets during the winter months when they are stalled overnight. Otherwise, they would demolish 3 flakes of hay within 45 minutes. The idea is to keep them eating slowly and steadily all night to keep their gutt moving without consuming 40 pounds of hay.

    As JB said, the notion that ALL horses need a slow feeder is ridiculous.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Sep. 25, 2005
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    The Land of the Frozen
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by kookicat View Post
    I can't open the web page- can someone clue me in?
    Certain barefoot cliques have started to design slow feeders, that come in all shapes and sizes. The page shows pictures of large boxes built with dividers inside, and tiny mesh wire, so that the hay has to be pulled through one stem at a time. Also haynets with tiny holes, like the Nibblenet.

    The "founder trap" people are talking about is a square box with a lid, but the grating on it looks to be large 4" square holes. Looks more like a hoof trap to me.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Mar. 20, 2001
    Location
    Colorado, a suburb of Los Angeles
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    6,660

    Default

    The feeders may be useful for some horses. I have trouble taking any company seriously that puts together such a poor website. Spell check and editing don't cost anything.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jul. 30, 2005
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    England
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Auventera Two View Post
    Certain barefoot cliques have started to design slow feeders, that come in all shapes and sizes. The page shows pictures of large boxes built with dividers inside, and tiny mesh wire, so that the hay has to be pulled through one stem at a time. Also haynets with tiny holes, like the Nibblenet.

    The "founder trap" people are talking about is a square box with a lid, but the grating on it looks to be large 4" square holes. Looks more like a hoof trap to me.
    Thanks. Sounds interesting. Not for every horse though.
    Horse Show Names Free name website with over 6200 names. Want to add? PM me!



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Nov. 4, 2003
    Location
    Dallas, Georgia
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    16,571

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Auventera Two View Post
    A great tool for some horses in some circumstances, and a heap of unnecessary propaganda for other horses in other situations. Two of my horses eat from small hole nets during the winter months when they are stalled overnight. Otherwise, they would demolish 3 flakes of hay within 45 minutes. The idea is to keep them eating slowly and steadily all night to keep their gutt moving without consuming 40 pounds of hay.

    As JB said, the notion that ALL horses need a slow feeder is ridiculous.
    Ditto on all counts.

    My hay-vacuums (aka The Mares) would go through their hay at light speed were it not for Small Mesh Hay Nets safely hung in their stalls during the winter.

    The small mesh hay nets and other Slow Feeders of all shapes, sizes and designs are meant for the Hay Vacuuming Horse or Pony. There are some fantastic ideas out there that clever people have come up with. I'm going to try the Hockey Nets this year over a round bale. Anything to make them slow down to grazing speed and avoid waste.
    <>< Sorrow Looks Back. Worry Looks Around. Faith Looks Up! -- "When they try to tell you these are your Golden years, don't believe 'em.... It's rust."



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
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    40,171

    Default

    How many horses have those people watched out to pasture 24/7?

    Our pastured horses eat a little, as fast or slow as they wish and then wander around or sleep it off, some times in set places in their pastures, some times right by water.

    We have pastured horses in pastures of several square miles, with all kinds of canyons and brush and draws, dams, etc., just like feral horses and have watched them many times.

    Horses have patterns to their grazing, but really don't eat anywhere close to 24/7.

    I think that restricting access to feed to a dribble for some horses may make them more anxious.
    Why do that to all horses, when just a few may really need that for other reasons?

    I think that the best management for any one horse and situation should not be driven by the ideology of the manager of the horse, but what the horse needs.



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2000
    Location
    MA
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    12,584

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BarbB View Post
    The feeders may be useful for some horses. I have trouble taking any company seriously that puts together such a poor website. Spell check and editing don't cost anything.

    My guess is that English is not the primary language of the purveyors.
    But their English is certainly superior to my Swedish...
    "It's like a Russian nesting doll of train wrecks."--CaitlinandTheBay

    ...just settin' on the Group W bench.



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Feb. 13, 2005
    Location
    Columbus, OH
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    6,801

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bluey View Post
    How many horses have those people watched out to pasture 24/7?

    Our pastured horses eat a little, as fast or slow as they wish and then wander around or sleep it off, some times in set places in their pastures, some times right by water.
    True, but I see the same behavior from my horse in his stall IF he's given a small-hole haynet. If you just throw three flakes of hay on the ground, he hoovers it up within the hour. If you give him a small-hole haynet, he comes and goes from it as he pleases, eventually eating all of it but pausing regularly for other activities.

    I think that restricting access to feed to a dribble for some horses may make them more anxious.
    Why do that to all horses, when just a few may really need that for other reasons?
    Nobody said anything about doing it to "all" horses. We're also not talking about handing the horse one stalk of hay at a time. It's entirely possible for them to get a mouthful of hay out of most of these machines. Observe: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Uou68...layer_embedded

    I wouldn't call that a "dribble" of food. I'd say that horse is eating at about the same rate that my horse grazes on pasture.

    I think that the best management for any one horse and situation should not be driven by the ideology of the manager of the horse, but what the horse needs.
    Amen. And some of us have either air-fern easy keepers, horses that are bored in their stalls, or horses that seem to metabolize their hay better when allowed to eat it over longer periods. Others of us, thank God, have much hardier and moderate beasts that need no such thing.
    ________________________
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