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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb. 7, 2002
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    UNITED STATES
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    Default Equine Resume

    Hello,

    I have been searching for work every where..... ugh.

    I have changed my resume be more "horsey" as that is what I'm going to probably have to focus on, since that is what I have been doing for 18 years. But, of course cleaning stalls/barn watch doesn't pay as good as a sit behind the desk job. Sigh.

    Anyone have a good example? I still want to have it presentable to non-equine businesses, but wondering if it is "blending" okay.

    I'm desperate and will take ANYTHING at this point---for ANY PRICE...just need something.

    OH, my cousins friend just spent $7,500 on her resume......she has been off work for over 8 months and even with her $7500 resume isn't finding work. UGH.

    Well, any idea's or thoughts on how to make cleaning a barn, grooming horses, foal watch and foaling (plus God knows the rest of the duties it takes to run a barn with 17 horses--by my self 98% of the time) sound like being a defense lawyer--let me know!!! LOL

    *Better to have loved than to have never loved at all.*
    ALWAYS Blessings NEVER losses.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep. 19, 2005
    Location
    MN
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    1,234

    Default

    I know it's kind of a pain, but you probably want to have two separate resumes -- one horsey and one non-horsey. I work as a "rental" in the software world and my company recommends having resumes geared towards even different positions within our skill sets - for example, one for a project lead position, one for a qa position, etc.
    Same with cover letters -- theyshould be tailered for each position you're applying for. Extra work, but i this economy it might be worth it. My contract ends soon and I'm not looking forward to finding the next one.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul. 10, 2008
    Posts
    1,954

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by slpeders View Post
    I know it's kind of a pain, but you probably want to have two separate resumes -- one horsey and one non-horsey. I work as a "rental" in the software world and my company recommends having resumes geared towards even different positions within our skill sets - for example, one for a project lead position, one for a qa position, etc.
    Same with cover letters -- theyshould be tailered for each position you're applying for. Extra work, but i this economy it might be worth it. My contract ends soon and I'm not looking forward to finding the next one.
    ditto. pick and choose your attributes/education/employment history to create resumes that will be most attractive to the person hiring for the position you're applying for. i also have a 'horsey' and a 'non horsey' resume, and while each is factual, they highlight and emphasize different qualites and experiencs. cover letters also MUST be tailored to each individual job so you come off as interesting, and interested in the position and company.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb. 7, 2007
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    1,423

    Default

    Ditto. Two separate resumes are the only way to go.

    Good luck.



  5. #5
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    Feb. 7, 2002
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    Default Thank you

    SO, what if I have been a "house wife" horse breeder--owning up to 27 horses at a time for the last 18 years. I had a couple part time jobs (both horsey)....and that is IT.

    Recommendations would be HUGE on how to make me look more hireable to the non-horsey world.... LOL Well, any world.

    THANK YOU AGAIN...great info and I'm getting on it!
    *Better to have loved than to have never loved at all.*
    ALWAYS Blessings NEVER losses.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov. 22, 2003
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    7,136

    Default

    Different resumes don't have different JOBS on them but different EMPHASES. For instance you could have one that emphasizes horse breeding, one that enumerates all your management/organuzational skills, one that emphasuzes working with children, etc. And NOW, while you're joob-hunting (and presumably unemployed), is the PERFECT TIME to do volunteer work in the field you want (job) experience in. Just because you don't get PAID doesn't mean tht you don't LEARN...



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov. 7, 2008
    Location
    Pittsburgh, PA
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Horsecrazy27 View Post
    SO, what if I have been a "house wife" horse breeder--owning up to 27 horses at a time for the last 18 years. I had a couple part time jobs (both horsey)....and that is IT.

    Recommendations would be HUGE on how to make me look more hireable to the non-horsey world.... LOL Well, any world.

    THANK YOU AGAIN...great info and I'm getting on it!
    The trick is to think of it as selling yourself - so what skills do you have from being a house wife and horse breeder that will transfer to other realms? Good organizational skills? Work ethic? Good sense of responsibility? Communication skills? What about budgeting and accounts?

    (I'm just throwing out the things that spring to mind immediately as possibilities - sit down yourself and brainstorm. What tasks did you do, and what skills does that task represent beyond the obvious result of completing the task? For example I'd imagine that a mare being bred via AI might involve some fairly detailed scheduling and planning.)

    Once you have your list of skills, you look at the types of resumes available - given your employment history, you want to use a resume style that emphasizes your skills rather then job history or education. (By contrast, someone who has just graduated from Harvard with an honors degree would probably want to place that fairly prominently in the resume if they're going for a job in their degree field.) Then put together a 'generic' resume using your information.

    BEFORE you send your resume off, however, you want to consider the job you're applying for (again in terms of the skills it requires) and possibly reorganize your resume so the stuff most important for the job is placed in the most prominent way. (Closer to the top of the resume so it'll be seen sooner, not buried in amongst a bunch of other things, etc.) If you have a generic resume worked up it's fairly easy to just cut n paste and move things around a little to tweak it.

    In addition, if you have any skills that are not obviously applicable to the job, but that you believe would be, you might mention that in your cover letter. (Keep it brief, however.) For example, someone with a film degree applying for a business job might want to put something in the cover letter drawing attention to the fact that producing a film involves a lot of basic organizational and management skills, since a lot of people won't think of that when they see 'film experience' on the resume.

    Basically if your background is somewhat unconventional, you need to 'connect the dots' for them in a non-obvious way, so that they don't just go "I have no idea why this person even applied, breeding horses has nothing to do with selling widgets!" and throw away your resume. The goal is to get them interested enough to bring you in for an interview. (That's basically the advice I've gotten frequently - the goal of a resume is not to get you a job, in most situations. The goal of the resume is to get you an interview. The goal of the interview is to sell yourself so you get the job.)



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr. 14, 2001
    Location
    Minnesota
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    18,550

    Default

    Highlight the global skills on your horsey resume. You've managed a barn, with barn workers? Mention the managerial experience and highlight that. Highlight the multitasking. Highlight the self-directed day. If you've been part of a lesson barn, highlight the $$$ in lessons sold per financial quarter. If you streamlined barn processes or were able to save the stable money, mention that. You can have bullet points listing your skills at the very top of your resume. Make them interesting.

    And, as I'm in this industry...look for call center work. My company starts quite high and promotes quickly from within. We're also hiring like crazy. Outsourcing is an industry that hasn't suffered in this economy. No, it's not horsey (probably not, anyway) but it will pay the bills and may offer some career development.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec. 2, 2003
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    296

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Horsecrazy27 View Post
    OH, my cousins friend just spent $7,500 on her resume......she has been off work for over 8 months and even with her $7500 resume isn't finding work.
    $7,500 for a resume!?! You gotta be kidding...



  10. #10
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    Aug. 22, 2005
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Austin Rider View Post
    $7,500 for a resume!?! You gotta be kidding...
    I am evidently in the wrong business. I could write up a resume that won't get somebody a job for a lot less than $7500.

    Also, as long as we're talking resumes: Would it be a big faux pas to put long-term (like almost fifteen years) experience as a volunteer horse show manager for my horse club in the "employment" section? I'm looking for a way to make my resume say "I can manage a horse show, schedule three dressage rings without putting somebody in two places at once, and deal with 'crazy horse people' -- how the hell hard can your silly little job be?"



  11. #11
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    Jul. 15, 2009
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    Northeastern PA
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    Default

    You can put something like volunteer work or other activities in a separate section--"Related Experience" is always a nice catch-all for trying to showcase skills. Often my college students have their best skill development in something other than their paid job experience; employers who need you to have specific skills only care that you have them, not where you got them or if you were paid for it. :-)



  12. #12
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    Feb. 7, 2002
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    Default LOL

    Quote Originally Posted by EiRide View Post
    You can put something like volunteer work or other activities in a separate section--"Related Experience" is always a nice catch-all for trying to showcase skills. Often my college students have their best skill development in something other than their paid job experience; employers who need you to have specific skills only care that you have them, not where you got them or if you were paid for it. :-)
    GOSH, some great idea's guys!!!

    I put on over 12 different "Breed Inspections"!! Organized them, managed them,etc!

    Okay, you all just inspired me to have more imagination!! I was really just plain "stuck" and feeling like my stuff wasn't "important" --- been a really hard last few months and have been so down. Hard to have imagination when your down, but this just lifted me!!! THANKS GUYS!!!!!
    *Better to have loved than to have never loved at all.*
    ALWAYS Blessings NEVER losses.



  13. #13
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    Jan. 14, 2003
    Location
    Massachusetts
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    Default

    It sounds like you should be looking for event planning jobs!



  14. #14
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    Default Thats and idea..

    Quote Originally Posted by sketcher View Post
    It sounds like you should be looking for event planning jobs!


    Haven't thought of that.... see----the more brains involved the better!!!
    *Better to have loved than to have never loved at all.*
    ALWAYS Blessings NEVER losses.



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