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  1. #1
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    Default Udder development in first time preg mare

    What is the earliest a first time pregnant mare can develop an udder?



  2. #2
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    It will vary. The earliest I've ever had a maiden start developing an udder was at 280 days (*note* developing, NOT a full udder by any means)... she foaled at 320 days, and was dripping for a day prior to that.
    Last edited by Dressage_Diva333; Sep. 11, 2009 at 11:51 AM.
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  3. #3
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    I only have had 3 maidens, but all 3 starting developing at 290-300 days and all went at 327-342 days
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  4. #4
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    Thanks, what's the earliest a foal can be born and survive?



  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dressage_Diva333 View Post
    It will vary. The earliest I've ever had a maiden start developing an udder was at 380 days (*note* developing, NOT a full udder by any means)... she foaled at 320 days, and was dripping for a day prior to that.
    Hopefully that was a typo and it didn't take her two months after delivery to get her milk in.



  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tango14 View Post
    Thanks, what's the earliest a foal can be born and survive?
    I know of a foal born at 303 days that survived. However, most feel that 320 days is the borderline between safe and not.

    If your mare is getting significant udder development very early, it is best to get a trans abdominal US to check for placentitis and rule out undiagnosed twins.



  7. #7
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    Thank you for that info Mary Lou. I will pass it on. I don't know exactly the date when the foal is due. At what stage in a pregnancy does twinning usually result in abortion if it's going to happen?



  8. #8
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    I had a mare with undiagnosed twins who started bagging up and dripping milk at 7 months.



  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Laurierace View Post
    Hopefully that was a typo and it didn't take her two months after delivery to get her milk in.

    Sorry, yes, that was a typo. I fixed it.



    The earliest I've ever had a foal born was that mare at 320... and it's amazing she held off that long. Everything appeared normal, the placenta looked fine. The foal, however, was very large. She had lax tendons in all fours, but recovered fine. She is now two years old and you would never know.
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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dressage_Diva333 View Post
    The earliest I've ever had a foal born was that mare at 320... and it's amazing she held off that long. Everything appeared normal, the placenta looked fine. The foal, however, was very large. She had lax tendons in all fours, but recovered fine. She is now two years old and you would never know.
    And I have a mare that has has perfectly normal, well developed foals at 313 and 316 days, so no hard an fast rules, just generalities when it comes to this.



  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Home Again Farm View Post
    I had a mare with undiagnosed twins who started bagging up and dripping milk at 7 months.
    I am supposing her babies didn't make it? How awfully sad. We try so hard but can't control everything. Esp when it comes to nature.



  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dressage_Diva333 View Post

    The earliest I've ever had a foal born was that mare at 320... and it's amazing she held off that long. Everything appeared normal, the placenta looked fine. The foal, however, was very large. She had lax tendons in all fours, but recovered fine. She is now two years old and you would never know.
    That gives me hope for my friend's mare, thanks.



  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Home Again Farm View Post
    And I have a mare that has has perfectly normal, well developed foals at 313 and 316 days, so no hard an fast rules, just generalities when it comes to this.
    Don't know how to combine quotes in a reply, so this is separate, but also gives me major hope that friend's mare will produce a healthy foal when it's ready to arrive. If she starts squirting colostrum then she must collect and freeze right?



  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tango14 View Post
    I am supposing her babies didn't make it? How awfully sad. We try so hard but can't control everything. Esp when it comes to nature.
    When we did the trans-abdominal US, it showed two foals of equal size, each in its own horn. After consulting at length with repro experts, I opted to abort her in the clinic for the mare's safety. It was very sad.

    As far as my mare that usually foals early, she never has dripped colostrum prematurely. I would guess that you could collect it if your mare starts losing hers, but I would also be sure to have alternative sources on hand at birth.

    How far along is the mare and what is she doing in the way of udder development right now?



  15. #15
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    It is very sad. I guess it's one of those things we have to make our mind up to. We can't make it an exact science and these things happen. Not so easy to accept at the time though.

    The vet reckoned on palpation that she's got about 3 months to go which ties in with what my friend calculates.

    Hard to accurately describe her udders. They are pretty saggy / plump and elongated on the sides where they are nearest the legs, but the centre is not really any different. The actual teats aren't swollen either. No discharge, no discomfort and all other clinical signs 100%. I was just a bit concerned because in my personal experience maiden mares usually don't show any udder until just before the foal is born, like a week before at the most. This, according to my friend, happened almost overnight. It co-incided with her upping the food so she thought it may just be 'fat' but I'm not so sure.



  16. #16
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    Sometimes mares that are chubby can have what looks a bit like udder development. I would keep a careful eye on her. It would not be a bad idea to do the trans-abdominal US now, because if it is placentitis, you CAN do something about that (medication now could mean the difference between a healthy foal and a disaster). Keep us posted.



  17. #17
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    I will tell her to get onto it pronto. What window does one have to work with if it is placentitis regarding treatment?



  18. #18
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    Later born foals July/Aug/Sept tend to have shorter gestations. I had a foal born August 9th at 311. She was perfectly normal. One of my mares always foals at day 329 - 336, and she begins to make a bag around day 280 to 285.

    The mares I have had with placentitus have tended to bag up quickly, not over several weeks. Not sure what others experience about that is ??



  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fairview Horse Center View Post
    Later born foals July/Aug/Sept tend to have shorter gestations. I had a foal born August 9th at 311. She was perfectly normal. One of my mares always foals at day 329 - 336, and she begins to make a bag around day 280 to 285.

    The mares I have had with placentitus have tended to bag up quickly, not over several weeks. Not sure what others experience about that is ??
    Well I'm hoping that the mare is further along than she thinks. Your last paragraph raised big alarm bells though!!



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