The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Results 1 to 14 of 14
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct. 21, 2005
    Location
    Baltimore by way of NC by way of DE
    Posts
    1,033

    Default Good All Around Suppliment for Young horse

    I just purchased a young OTTB. He is tiny, tiny. Part of that is he is just going to be a small horse. The other part of that is he's never really received suppliments, had a customized feed plan, been able to graze, etc.

    He's not sickly, he's just a little rough looking and runtish.

    What is a good all around suppliment(s) to ad to his feed. i just got him (as in yesterday) so he is still being fed his old feed which is a 12% sweet with crimped oats 2qts of each twice/day.

    I can tell now he is not going to eat that. i know he is adjusting, but thats a lot of food to throw at him and he is a "picker at his food"

    my last OTTB did pretty well on "Fat Cat (Kat?)" and probios. And another did well on "Grow and Win" this was a few years ago. I am sure there is something new and improved out there.

    Suggestions?
    \"A smart lady knows its ok to change her mind, a damn fool never does\"



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul. 14, 2003
    Location
    MA
    Posts
    6,444

    Default

    I would put him on a really good complete feed like Triple Crown Complete. That company is very meticulous about getting in the right vitamins and minerals at the right ratios as long as you feed the right quantity. Complete has "cool" calories, higher fat and not a lot of starch.

    http://www.triplecrownfeed.com/complete.php

    The only other thing that I would add is Ration Plus, which I have found to be really helpful with OTTBs that are picky eaters (probably high acidity or ulcers, btw.)

    http://www.rationplus.com/rphorse.htm

    Good luck.
    "Against stupidity the gods themselves contend in vain" ~Friedrich Schiller



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct. 13, 2006
    Location
    3rd rock from the sun
    Posts
    830

    Default

    I like missing link or missing link plus (has gloucosamine) if feeding a horse on a basic simple sweet feed. Horses eat it up, has the probios and pretty much all of the nutirents they need and is easy on the system for horses that are not used to supplements.

    I don't use it if i'm feeding a diet that has an all around feed like equine senior because the feed will already have those nutrients and probiotics. for my OTTB, I like to ad cool calories for more fat (he's on equine senior) but beet pulp also works great too..and lots and lots of hay!



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar. 2, 2009
    Posts
    150

    Default

    keep1belle...

    Please provide more information on this horse..what is the age of the horse, height and the body condition??? You definitely want to get him OFF the sweet feed and oats, that combination is terribly high in starches and sugars which can lead to your bone/joint issues with growing horses and breeds that can be/generally are going to get big...you need to be careful with their growth... What do you feed for a hay, what is the quality, estimated amount he gets???

    Right now my feed recommendation is leaning toward TC Growth since
    1. it sounds like he is eating a good amount/weight of feed and will need it to maintain his weight

    2. it is a high fat, high fiber beetpulp based feed so the higher fat will again help with weight and the high fiber is safer than a grainbased feed

    3. TC growth is low in NSC which is 13.9% -again very good for a growing horse to avoid bone/joint/growth issues

    4. The Growth is specifically formulated with essential amounts of amino acids for broodmares and growing horses, it is fed until the horse is the age of 2 and then we'd consider a switch to TC complete or TC senior.

    5. TC feeds contain biotin, probiotics, digestive enzymes, mycotoxin binders etc.

    If you have any more questions please feel free to ask...
    Triple Crown feed fan?
    Join Triple Crown Nutrition, Inc. on facebook at:
    http://www.facebook.com/home.php?#/p...6908807?ref=mf



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb. 12, 2009
    Location
    Charlottesville, VA
    Posts
    435

    Default

    I'd focus on getting him on a really good feeding program and not worry so much about supplements right away. Have you talked to your vet about it?



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan. 7, 2008
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    548

    Default

    I agree with SOTB. Get your new horse on a good feeding program recommended by your veterinarian. If you don't see the changes within a few months then it would be time to discuss this with your veterinarian again. I use platinum performance. You can find out more information about it from your veterinarian or go to the website www.platinumperformance.com but before adding the supplements definitely work on a good feeding program first and give it time. Enjoy your new horse.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul. 25, 2003
    Location
    Boston Area
    Posts
    8,496

    Default

    If you have a good feeding program you won't need supplements. They should be used only to fill in areas of deficiency. You should probably start with an analysis on your hay and go from there.

    I'd suggest consulting a nutritionist rather than a vet. My vet always refers those questions to one as he feels they can give better advice.
    Equine Ink - My soapbox for equestrian writings & reviews.
    EquestrianHow2 - Operating instructions for your horse.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec. 13, 1999
    Location
    Greensboro, NC
    Posts
    36,091

    Default

    Well, part of the deal will be decided by how many calories above and beyond his forage he needs. If his weight is pretty good, then he likely can't take the 5-6lb or whatever of the TC Complete, as nice as that product is, to get the nutritional benefit.

    If he needs weight, then go for it.

    Separate calories from nutrition. If he can only take the calories from, say, 2lb of the TC Complete, he's being shorted on the nutritional aspect. That's where ration balancers and vit/min supplements come in - low(er) calories, high nutrition, and if calories are necessary later, you can add them in the form of alfalfa pellets, beet pulp, rice bran, boss, or any combination of that.

    I would really, really not go right to something like Fat Cat or any other "weight builder". Build a solid feeding program first. THEN, if he just won't eat more, you start looking at really concenrated calories like those things.

    Also, given his prior situation, I would be in a big hurry to do a Power Pack on him - make sure you are not feeding critters.
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct. 21, 2005
    Location
    Baltimore by way of NC by way of DE
    Posts
    1,033

    Default

    He is a 3 yr OTTB. about 15 hands on a good day. He's not in bad shape per se just very runtish looking in every way. We have TB yearlings at the farm that are bigger and look more developed than him He also hasnt been ridden or turned out in at least 2 months so there is no muscle tone there which makes him look even more dwarf.

    Anyway, at the Track he was getting 2qts oats and 2qts sweet feed twice daily.

    We have since transitioned him over to 1.5 qt ultium he also gets Pro MC in the am.

    He has just been out in the field getting used to things for the last two weeks we had the farrier, dentist vet out, etc. the first week he lost some more weight - due to stress. the BO he "cried" a lot at night, he has settled in now and some of that weight is slowly coming on.

    I will start riding him this weekend.


    Quote Originally Posted by tcnhorsefeed View Post
    keep1belle...

    Please provide more information on this horse..what is the age of the horse, height and the body condition??? You definitely want to get him OFF the sweet feed and oats, that combination is terribly high in starches and sugars which can lead to your bone/joint issues with growing horses and breeds that can be/generally are going to get big...you need to be careful with their growth... What do you feed for a hay, what is the quality, estimated amount he gets???

    Right now my feed recommendation is leaning toward TC Growth since
    1. it sounds like he is eating a good amount/weight of feed and will need it to maintain his weight

    2. it is a high fat, high fiber beetpulp based feed so the higher fat will again help with weight and the high fiber is safer than a grainbased feed

    3. TC growth is low in NSC which is 13.9% -again very good for a growing horse to avoid bone/joint/growth issues

    4. The Growth is specifically formulated with essential amounts of amino acids for broodmares and growing horses, it is fed until the horse is the age of 2 and then we'd consider a switch to TC complete or TC senior.

    5. TC feeds contain biotin, probiotics, digestive enzymes, mycotoxin binders etc.

    If you have any more questions please feel free to ask...
    \"A smart lady knows its ok to change her mind, a damn fool never does\"



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar. 2, 2009
    Posts
    150

    Default

    keep1,

    you still didn't mention the forage he is getting...now knowing his age and body condition, that he doesn't really lack weight (other than he needs to be maintained, he sounds like he is your typical TB, more feed necessary than easykeeper breeds) He more or less needs to fill out and get some muscle tone. I'd look to TC complete or TC senior..both also have 5 lb feeding minimums to meet vit/min needs but more can be fed to meet his ideal body condition...he if can only eat say 3-4lb of one of these feeds (due to getting too heavy at 5 lb of feed or more, I highly doubt this) that is when you'd bring in our 30% supplement (1 lb) added to the amount of feed you are giving him to help meet his vit/min requirements.

    If hay is not already tested, I agree it might not be a bad idea to do that and see what you have for nutrient content, starch, sugar content etc.

    If you feed a lot of alf hay, we'd most likely recommend TC complete..if you feed grass hay or a mix or this particular horse is very hot and you'd like to keep him quieter we would recommend TC Senior is the NSC% is almost half the amount of complete.

    TC complete is 20.6% NSC
    TC Senior is 11.7% NSC

    *both are beet pulp based, high in fiber, 10% fat, 5 lb min feeding recommendation
    complete is 11% protein, senior is 14% protein
    Last edited by tcnhorsefeed; Sep. 18, 2009 at 03:25 PM. Reason: edits
    Triple Crown feed fan?
    Join Triple Crown Nutrition, Inc. on facebook at:
    http://www.facebook.com/home.php?#/p...6908807?ref=mf



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct. 21, 2005
    Location
    Baltimore by way of NC by way of DE
    Posts
    1,033

    Default

    Thanks!.

    What does NSC% stand for

    He is boarded, they have not tested the hay. But I can ask or call the local Ag extension office and go about it that way...Im interested to know. They feed a timothy/grass mix. He gets about 4 flakes per day and then is out to pasture the rest of the day. I havent weighed the hay, so I dont know the lbs...

    To give him the best shot i will more than likely have to buy seperate food than the barn has, though I will still most likely be charged the full board rate.

    This is part of the reason i was asking about suppliments. Because if he is getting the Ultium (that the barn feeds) and is missing nutrients than i wanted to try and suppliment what he would be missing. But all in all i guess the cost of suppliments vs. the cost of feed/month may come out to about the same.
    \"A smart lady knows its ok to change her mind, a damn fool never does\"



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jul. 25, 2003
    Location
    Boston Area
    Posts
    8,496

    Default

    Three horses (out of five) at my barn eat Ultium and they all do very well on it. As long as you feed at least the minimum amount (I believe it's 3 lbs but it's been awhile since I fed it) then you do not need additional supplements because it is a complete feed with a good nutritional profile.
    Equine Ink - My soapbox for equestrian writings & reviews.
    EquestrianHow2 - Operating instructions for your horse.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jun. 21, 2004
    Location
    Cairo, Georgia
    Posts
    2,452

    Default

    I emailed Purina & was immediately answered & told to never feed Ultium to growing horses. They said it's just not designed for them.
    I can't say enough about how great feeding a ration balancer is. It's just a more natural way of feeding horses. Much less concentrate & the roughage is in the more natural hay & pasture form.
    I'd use either Progressive or Buckeye ration balancers. Seminole is good but found that my horses are looking better now on Buckeye.
    I also agree with feeding the probiotics. I love one of the cheaper ones, Manna Pro Opti-Zyme. Has digestive enzymes added also.
    If you need something to boost him off to a good start you might try something like Platinum Performance but there are several out there that are good.
    Producing horses with gentle minds & brilliant movement!
    www.whitfieldfarm.shutterfly.com



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Oct. 21, 2005
    Location
    Baltimore by way of NC by way of DE
    Posts
    1,033

    Default

    Thanks Whitfield!!!

    Thats kind of what I was wondering. He is 3 and slow to grow, he needs all the help he can get. Ultium does seem to be great for the older horses.

    I will check out a a ration balancer type feed.
    ETA: Jusat looked and "grow n win" is a ration balancer - I mentioned this in my OP, and have used it before. Also M30 which I have seen horses do well on.

    Thanks again for the info.

    Quote Originally Posted by Whitfield Farm Hanoverians View Post
    I emailed Purina & was immediately answered & told to never feed Ultium to growing horses. They said it's just not designed for them.
    I can't say enough about how great feeding a ration balancer is. It's just a more natural way of feeding horses. Much less concentrate & the roughage is in the more natural hay & pasture form.
    I'd use either Progressive or Buckeye ration balancers. Seminole is good but found that my horses are looking better now on Buckeye.
    I also agree with feeding the probiotics. I love one of the cheaper ones, Manna Pro Opti-Zyme. Has digestive enzymes added also.
    If you need something to boost him off to a good start you might try something like Platinum Performance but there are several out there that are good.
    \"A smart lady knows its ok to change her mind, a damn fool never does\"



Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 8
    Last Post: Jan. 28, 2011, 04:58 PM
  2. Good trainer to start young horse near Albany, NY?
    By missyrideson in forum Hunter/Jumper
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: Nov. 15, 2010, 03:32 PM
  3. Good training program for a young horse?
    By MYalterID in forum Dressage
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: Sep. 1, 2010, 02:45 PM
  4. Good horse shows for young jumpers.
    By horsescomefirst in forum Hunter/Jumper
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: Jan. 30, 2010, 07:22 PM
  5. Replies: 21
    Last Post: Oct. 12, 2009, 10:26 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
randomness