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  1. #1
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    Jan. 30, 2007
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    Default moving a gelded yearling into a pasture with adult geldings? advice?

    I have to move my boy. he's 17 months old. VERY easy. super calm. plays well with others etc. He loves his current pasture buddies but unfortunately I have to move him. The best option is a place with an appropriate pasture but with all adults, geldings. they all get along well, have no hind shoes etc.

    Any advice here or experiences? I wanted him to be with other youngsters I'm just not finding anything nearby. Anywhere nearby.

    he was in a stall from January until just last month (laid up) and was almost always stabled next to adults.

    I just don't want to see him bullied. I'm imagining these hardened thugs bullting him, stealing his lunch money.......
    Last edited by tisor; Aug. 30, 2009 at 09:19 PM.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
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    TX
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    We raised our last stallion pastured with the geldings.
    They taught him manners, but he was smart and deferred to them and, being easygoing and calm, never got into anything.

    He lived with the geldings even as a mature stallion and never was boss.
    When we were hand breeding, we teased across a safe fence with the gelding pasture and the boss gelding did the honors.
    If the mare was receptive, the stallion would mosey to the gate, where we would put him in, get him ready, he teased the mare, serviced her and we turned him back with the geldings.

    Once the mares were mostly bred, we turned him out with them to catch any that may not have stayed bred, but he would stand by the gate, wanting back with the geldings, as they were bred and I guess he knew it.

    That stallion raced, won some, achieved a fair rating and was my personal ranch horse, that I used even neighboring, that is helping work cattle at the neighbors.

    I would say that if your stallion does right outside will depend on the group he is turned with, what else there is going on and, most important, his disposition, how aggressive he may be, or some of the geldings may be.
    If you don't have a bully, why not?

    There is always a chance of injury and turned out with others that increases, but you will have a better socialized and maybe happier horse, if he feels part of a horse group.



  3. #3
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    Jan. 30, 2007
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    Default oh my boy was just gelded last month!

    I probbaly should have added that. he's a gelding too. I was more concerned about his being pushed around by the grown ups. he has good manners I just want him to have buddies too and the grown ones just dint seem to pair upas the babies do.

    Also is there an ideal way to introduce him to the new herd? The barn is suggesting the intro occur in the evening as half of the pastured horses sleep indoors at night.

    Should I ave him indoors next to one he seems to get along with in the evening so that he alreday "knows" someone when he goes to pasture?

    Am I just worrying way too much?

    As to injuries, one of the reasons he was laid up for months was that he was kicked by a filly foal and had to have arthroscopic surgery to clean up the damage. he seems all good as new now (fingers crossed) so I get that that can happen with any group though his current set of yearlings all seem to have it figured out. his best buddy is the dominant one of the group which I kind of like. I feel like he looks after him.



  4. #4
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    Jan. 4, 2007
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    TX
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    Default

    We keep horses across a good fence, pipe panels, so they can interact, but not get to each other to fuss, for a few days, depending on the group, longer or shorter time.

    If there is a real bossy one, we take him out and let the others learn about the new horse and later turn the bossy one out, when the new one knows the lay of the land and the horses in that group better.

    Even then, sometimes there are surprises, so you have to watch them carefully for a long while, have someone keep an eye on things.

    Now, our horses live outside all the time, so that your horse may come in to eat in peace will be an asset, as he needs extra good food as a yearling the older horses don't need.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan. 1, 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by tisor View Post
    I just don't want to see him bullied. I'm imagining these hardened thugs bullting him, stealing his lunch money.......
    There's a pretty good chance that's exactly what would happen.

    I've found, after years of watching herd dynamics, young geldings do better with a band of mares. Yes, they'll still be bullied somewhat, but mares are generally not vicious. Mares get in your face, then are over it. Older geldings will go after a young horse just for the hell of it, and will keep it up.

    I have a two-year-old gelding out with my broodmares. They shake their heads at him and back up when he gets too close, or is annoying, but they don't chase him, beat him up, or run him in the field. If he's stupid, he gets it, if he behaves himself, the mares leave him alone. Generally speaking, it's a good education for him on manners!



  6. #6
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    Jan. 30, 2007
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    Default

    thanks that helps. dont know that i can get him a corral situation next to the group. we'd almost have to build it. the people at his new place are very nice though so i know they'll work with me but the hrses are also boarder horses so it'll be hard to mess with their routines etc.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar. 6, 2009
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    Default

    Ditto what BLUEY said ~ be safe.
    Zu Zu Bailey " IT"S A WONDERFUL LIFE !"



  8. #8

    Default

    We actually selectively turn our yearlings out with geldings for this reason exactly...yearling getting too bratty...out with the geldings...yearling having short attention span...out with the geldings...yearling acting a fool...out with the geldings.

    If your yearling has good herd manners...he will be accepted and not abused based on size. It may have to happen for awhile for him to become a solid citizen...

    You can separate with one of the geldings and then re-introduce them both which seems to make the transition easier.

    I would recommend turning out early day so you have sunlight to see if any issues.

    You may need to separate if graining...they will sort out herd dynamics for hay. He may have to eat last for awhile.

    As a nice aside,...if he gets nice in the herd...he will be nicer for you to work with in day to day. You will notice a big change



  9. #9
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    Jan. 30, 2007
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    he's already a doll in the herd. i've even been told by a trainer he's almost "too nice" he will stand back and take his food last. he's a smart boy so maybe he just nows he'll get it and doesn't have to be a jerk about it. so if he's the nice boy, should he go to mares or geldings?

    this was just about three months agao.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9tg0zPEURiI



  10. #10
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    oh and here he is with his two year old buddy just this month. not rambunctious at all. if anything he seems to want his buddy to stop! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3635i...eature=related



  11. #11

    Default

    From the first video you posted, I doubt he'll have any issue assimilating with any herd. He is very respectful and submissive. Usually your colts that have problems are the ones that go in very boldly/rudely.

    I am surprised by above comments recommending that mares are kinder. We rotate 18 horses between 4 pasture/paddocks. Our mare pasture is the least kind to new stock- so for the most part they stay together. I have seen mares in heat pin a horse, and be more inclined to kick. Also, just more squealing and drama in general. The geldings tend to be very easy.

    The only other two things I would say to watch for is if you have a smaller/tighter area (shelter or by food bunk)...sometimes young horses will get to running and then get stuck in that area and get in trouble the first time they are turned out. You might just have a rope/lunge whip handy in case this happens to drive them back out into the open area.

    Also, sometimes horses will get jealous when newbie is being brought in by owner. Avoid treats or you will get a submissive colt in trouble. Also remember that once you put him on the lead to bring him in...it is your job to protect him while being led to and through the gate. Sometimes you might need to drive off others when jealous.



  12. #12
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    Oct. 29, 1999
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    I always introduce the new one with one other - usually the dominant one - taking away all of the herd leader's buddies. I try to leave a youngster like that with the leader horse for 4-6 hours before introducing the others. Then I introduce in an order that puts the leaders favorite buddies last. I add a horse each time the new group settles down.

    The better the herd leader, the easier it goes. If you have a horse in a leader position, that is not a true leader, then it can be really hard, and that is when horses get chased and bullied.

    Keep a bale of some really yummy hay near by. If you get in trouble from them chasing, you can put a BUNCH of flakes really far apart to make most of them go eat.



  13. #13
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    Jan. 30, 2007
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    this is all really good thanks. I’ll see if I can’t get him a buddy that he meets across a stall the first day or two, then turn them out just in the day and stable them again at night. do it gradually.

    I will DEFINITELY avoid treats. i learned that a bit already when he was with pushier foals. in his new group i can give them all carrots and they're all pretty cool but he did initially start AVOIDING ME when he was first pastured because I was getting him picked on!!!!



  14. #14
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    Jun. 2, 2009
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Movin Artfully View Post
    From the first video you posted, I doubt he'll have any issue assimilating with any herd. He is very respectful and submissive. Usually your colts that have problems are the ones that go in very boldly/rudely.
    After seeing the video of him, I totally agree with the above. We have a few young geldings/colts who are identical in nature to your boy and they can slot happily and easily into any one of my herds. None of my lot give them a hard time. I generally raise my youngsters with some good kind mares until they are yearlings or 2 year olds and these mares, although careful to teach manners, are not bullies. Some of my other mares would be if allowed to raise them! But then some of my geldings might be too, but with youngsters with this kind of demeanor, they rarely have trouble with any horses.

    Good luck - hope all goes well.



  15. #15
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    Jan. 30, 2007
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    thanks. this is all VERY helpful. I think we'll suggest the following..

    stable him three days next to one of the lead geldings (if not the lead) so that they can become buddies. if they can be turned out next to each other or taken on walks together that'd be great. then turn them out into the herd which has a full time pasture contingent and a part time/day shift contingent, turn him out during the day BEFORE the rest of the day shift is out. maybe let him have without the day shift herd out then back in the stall with his buddy, then the next day into the herd with everyone. then he's out for good.

    again. NOT a problem horsethis Corlando baby... http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bvH_macADNA



  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by tisor View Post
    thanks. this is all VERY helpful. I think we'll suggest the following..

    stable him three days next to one of the lead geldings (if not the lead) so that they can become buddies. if they can be turned out next to each other or taken on walks together that'd be great. then turn them out into the herd which has a full time pasture contingent and a part time/day shift contingent, turn him out during the day BEFORE the rest of the day shift is out. maybe let him have without the day shift herd out then back in the stall with his buddy, then the next day into the herd with everyone. then he's out for good.

    again. NOT a problem horsethis Corlando baby... http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bvH_macADNA
    OK, that video gives new meaning to the term, "couch potato"! What a little cutie!



  17. #17
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    We introduced a yearling into our herd last year. The herd consisted of a 4yo Trak/TB - Alpha, 11yo TB and a 13yo OTTB. Eventhough our horses averaged 16.2, the baby had spent his life with a herd of WB mares that were in the 17hh range. He did the submisive baby mouthy thing and it went REALLY easy.

    Our boys are already well mannered, but we removed the alpha and the runner (ottb) b/c we figured them to be the most likely to cause problems. We didn't want the alpha, Mr. Kick first, questions later to kill him or the OTTB to run him into the ground. The three of them ended up doing the "we're cool, you aren't" thing but after about two days he was grazing with them.

    Funny enough, when we introduced our new Hano mare a couple of weeks ago, it was MUCH more difficult than with the yearling. The baby (who is now 2) reverted to the baby mouth moves eventhough he's now 16hh, sadly he is still the whipping post for everyone else.
    www.foxwoodfarms.biz
    "There are no stupid questions, but there are a LOT of inquisitive idiots."
    -Member of the Mighty Thoroughbred Clique!
    http://community.webshots.com/user/wlrottge



  18. #18
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    yeah i dont want mine to be a whipping post we have a month to strategize before he moves



  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by tisor View Post
    yeah i dont want mine to be a whipping post we have a month to strategize before he moves
    Well, he's not abused, but he's got more nips than any of the others in the pasture. Sadly someone has to be the bottom....
    www.foxwoodfarms.biz
    "There are no stupid questions, but there are a LOT of inquisitive idiots."
    -Member of the Mighty Thoroughbred Clique!
    http://community.webshots.com/user/wlrottge



  20. #20
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    it turns out there IS a small pasture adjacent to the larger one that will be available at the end of September which is when he moves. so we'll in and out of stall him with a buddy then pasture him with that buddy maybe move another in there then everyone out to the big pasture. sort of ideal. might have been meant to be!



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