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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul. 14, 2003
    Location
    Charlotte, NC, USA
    Posts
    551

    Default Pour in Pads

    I am looking for any and all information about pour in pads. Please educate me. Vet recommended them for husband's older TWH after the trail ride from ****. Got lost hoof boot wouldnt stay on....ugh. She is bruised on both front hooves. I have a pony that on a scale from 1 - 10 has a 11+++ on feet. I have never seen pour ins, no idea what to expect, cost, time, upkeep/care. Meeting the farrier tomorrow that was recommended to me but would like to at least ask half way intelligent questions and know what to even ask.
    TIA!
    Pamela Ellis



  2. #2
    Join Date
    May. 12, 2009
    Posts
    55

    Default

    I use them. I have not had a problem with them. They stay in very well. Use a blacksmith that is comfortable with them. They have helped my big warmblood. They are a bit pricey. I have in front feet. Other show horses in our barn have them to. I have not had to do anything different. I dont consider there to be any upkeep. They get replaced with each shoeing. Similar to other pads you might have.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun. 5, 2007
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    1,190

    Default

    I use them when my horse is shod. (she's bare now)

    I used Equipak CS and did the pad pouring myself. LOVED the stuff.

    Farrier shod the mare in front shoes. I then followed the instructions and put the Equipak CS in both fronts.

    I ran short of material (first time, underestimated the amount I would need) but it still performed fabulously. Stayed in, hoof was supported. LOVED it.

    Farrier recommended using Magic Cushion on either side of the frog prior to pouring in the Equipak. If I did it again, I would definitely try the MC under the Equipak CS.

    It is pricey. The gun is $85.00 and for my mares size 4 hooves, it would have taken 3 180cc tubes. ($30.00 each!) I only had 2 tubes on hand and was a 1/2" short in the last quarter of one hoof. Bugged the heck out of me, but she didn't seem to mind.

    Price is a huge drawback, but the product works fabulously.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb. 9, 2005
    Location
    Upper Midwest
    Posts
    5,759

    Default

    This may seem obvious, but make sure the farrier secures the mesh under the shoe prior to pouring in the pad. Keeps the pad from falling out. If your farrier has done these then he/she will know that I'm sure.

    Also, my horse flipped over when he stepped down on the styrafoam--very unusual reaction, but I'd hold the horse and not do cross ties just in case. If you go to Equipac or Equithane or whatever it's called website there is video I believe of how it is done.

    If you take care of the problem now, you likely won't be stuck doing these forever. If you feel bad about the money, I'll trade you--pour in pads with entirely glued on shoes $$$ (we are hoping for 3 weeks).
    Siouxland Sporthorses: http://slsfarm.blogspot.com/

    DIY Journey of Remodeling the Farmette: http://weownblackacre.blogspot.com/



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun. 5, 2007
    Location
    New Hampshire
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    1,190

    Default

    Just wanted to mention that I did not use the mesh under the shoe with the Equipak CS. I prepped the hoof with denatured alcohol and a hair drier, but no mesh.

    The pads were still tight after 6 weeks (farrier had to work to pry them off), so you don't necessarily need the mesh for the Equipak to stay in place.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul. 14, 2003
    Location
    Charlotte, NC, USA
    Posts
    551

    Default

    Ha! I'll pass on trading. I do NOT want to know! I would pass out with my checkbook in my hand. My last 2 horses have had awesome feet. No shoes for showing or trail riding. I am just trying to prepare myself. BIG CHECK. DONT FREAK. LOL. Mare is a awesome husband horse so she is worth her weight in gold but man...EEK. big check, worth it.
    Pamela Ellis



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct. 20, 2008
    Location
    Sunshine State
    Posts
    2,215

    Default

    We've used the Equipak with great success. There are a few different types... We preferred the softer one for a navicular gelding. We did not use the mesh and it worked GREAT. It is pricey but well worth it. He was always so comfortable in his "sneakers."



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul. 14, 2003
    Location
    Charlotte, NC, USA
    Posts
    551

    Default

    Where were you able to get the materials yourself from? Is it hard to do? Get out to re-do? Thanks a Million!
    Pamela Ellis



  9. #9
    Join Date
    May. 17, 2000
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    Where am I and what am I doing in this handbasket?
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    Default

    you can get the gun for a lot less than $85 - just check out jeffers. most places charge under $50. It's the tips that drive me crazy w/the cost. Also the foam pads are worth the expense, makes it a lot easier to apply the pads.
    Definition of "Horse": a 4 legged mammal looking for an inconvenient place and expensive way to die. Any day they choose not to execute the Master Plan is just more time to perfect it. Be Very Afraid.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun. 5, 2007
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    New Hampshire
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DMK View Post
    you can get the gun for a lot less than $85 - just check out jeffers. most places charge under $50. It's the tips that drive me crazy w/the cost. Also the foam pads are worth the expense, makes it a lot easier to apply the pads.
    Yeah, but that's the cheap gun. I bought the higher quality gun....and they are $85.00.

    I agree, the foam adhesive pads are 100% necessary for a successful outcome.

    Tips weren't too bad. I used two per hoof, so that's about 4 bucks for one application.

    It's the $90 for the urethane that kills me!



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun. 5, 2007
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    New Hampshire
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by belleellis View Post
    Where were you able to get the materials yourself from? Is it hard to do? Get out to re-do? Thanks a Million!
    I picked up all the goods from Meader Supply in Rochester, NH. Was up there for Derby Day at the Myher Equine center so I swung by before I left.

    I think Valley Vet sells some Vettec products too.



    It was tricky to do the first time. I think subsequent times would be much easier as the unknown factor of what happens and how the stuff reacts is no longer unknown. If you apply it correctly, it shouldn't come out between shoeings. The farrier removes it with the old shoe, and you can re-apply once the new shoes are on.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Aug. 9, 2002
    Location
    USA
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    Default

    BF is a certified farrier. He uses pour in pads under regular pads. No mesh, no foam adhesive boards. I imagine if you are not using regular plastic or frog support pads along with Equipak, Silpak, etc... then the mesh would be necessary.

    The cheapest place we've found to buy tips is at Jeffers (maybe KV Vet?) and they also sell other Vettec products.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Apr. 7, 2005
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    With a dog named Rockstar
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    Default

    They work great. Worlds better than boots. Poor horse.

    I have my farrier do that- I'm not going to try to save a few pennies and harm my horse.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Mar. 4, 2004
    Location
    Louisville, KY
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    3,994

    Default

    I've been emailing Vettec that manufactures Equi-Pak and Sole Guard because I'm interested in their products for my mare. They are going to come out with a new kit that is all inclusive: plunger, mix tips, and enough material for two hooves. $24.95 for the Sole Guard, and there will also be another kit that includes Equi-Pak CS for thrush. She said this should be out in about a month. I'm excited!

    Caitlin
    Caitlin
    *OMGiH I Loff my Mare* and *My Saddlebred Can Do Anything Your Horse Can Do*
    http://community.webshots.com/user/redmare01



  15. #15
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    Aug. 9, 2002
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    USA
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    Default

    Beware of the Sole Guard. We have found it falls out quickly.



  16. #16
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    May. 17, 2000
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    Default

    do you get $40 more performance out of the fancy gun, because best as i can tell, they both do the same thing - get stuff out of the tubes an onto the horse's feet! *snork*

    eta -i've been doing it for about 4 years and the key is preparation and getting everything laid out in easy reach.

    oh yeah, and a good quiet horse. a few months ago I was doing the solegard on the 2 year old and i did one foot, then whipped to the other side to see if i could catch the other foot w/o changing tips ... just like i do on the old man. slapped the plastic on hoof#1, set the foot down, did a lightning dash under his neck and grabbed the other foot ... and about the time my brain remembered this was a STUPID idea for a youngster, he freaked out, pulled back, drug foot #1 back, smeared all the unset stuff on the blacktop (hey, it matched) and i ended up using 3 tips and another tube to do the project right and then the first pad fell out in short order because applying new stuff over a foot with some old stuff isn't a great idea.

    Yup, that's me. Proving once again that stupidity SHOULD be painful.
    Last edited by DMK; Aug. 28, 2009 at 12:50 PM.
    Definition of "Horse": a 4 legged mammal looking for an inconvenient place and expensive way to die. Any day they choose not to execute the Master Plan is just more time to perfect it. Be Very Afraid.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Feb. 9, 2005
    Location
    Upper Midwest
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    5,759

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tarynls View Post
    BF is a certified farrier. He uses pour in pads under regular pads. No mesh, no foam adhesive boards. I imagine if you are not using regular plastic or frog support pads along with Equipak, Silpak, etc... then the mesh would be necessary.

    The cheapest place we've found to buy tips is at Jeffers (maybe KV Vet?) and they also sell other Vettec products.
    Yes, when I said mesh, I was also talking about not using plastic, etc. Just the pour in.
    Siouxland Sporthorses: http://slsfarm.blogspot.com/

    DIY Journey of Remodeling the Farmette: http://weownblackacre.blogspot.com/



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Mar. 13, 2006
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    457

    Default

    Very timely thread...

    Last week farrier came out and reset the horse. Lame the next day, I was thinking hot nail. Farrier hadn't called back so I brought out a local who pondered on it over night, and decided it wasn't a hot nail but sole pressure from an unbeveled shoe. He had me scrub both feet with a wire brush to make sure they were clean (and I'm very anal about these things so I spent a good portion of the afternoon just cleaning the bottoms of his feet).

    He did the Sole Guard and instantly the horse was sound, and it's stayed in now all week (in the humid/wet North Carolina climate). Figure by now even if it falls out, we'll probably be ok, but it looks good and tight.

    But LOVE LOVE LOVE the stuff. My vet couldn't believe the difference it made when she watched him jog up 2 days later.



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Feb. 3, 2000
    Location
    Nokesville, VA
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    35,150

    Default

    Belle was in them for close to a year. With mesh, farreir applied. Both front feet. She had an intermittent lameness in the left front that it completerly "cured". And when we stopped using them she stayed sound.

    She threw one shoe while using them, which was as much due to my throwing her off balance as anything else.

    IIRC it was on the order of an extra $100 per time. Well worth it.
    Janet

    chief feeder and mucker for Music, Spy, Belle and Tiara. Someone else is now feeding and mucking for Chief and Brain (both foxhunting now).



  20. #20
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    Mar. 16, 2006
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    Larkspur, Colo.
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    4,915

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by roki143 View Post
    Very timely thread...

    Last week farrier came out and reset the horse. Lame the next day, I was thinking hot nail. Farrier hadn't called back so I brought out a local who pondered on it over night, and decided it wasn't a hot nail but sole pressure from an unbeveled shoe. He had me scrub both feet with a wire brush to make sure they were clean (and I'm very anal about these things so I spent a good portion of the afternoon just cleaning the bottoms of his feet).

    He did the Sole Guard and instantly the horse was sound, and it's stayed in now all week (in the humid/wet North Carolina climate). Figure by now even if it falls out, we'll probably be ok, but it looks good and tight.

    But LOVE LOVE LOVE the stuff. My vet couldn't believe the difference it made when she watched him jog up 2 days later.
    I'm at a loss as to how Sole-Guard would have corrected a sole pressure problem from an unbeveled shoe.

    And I wonder why he used Sole-Guard (designed for bare hoof) instead of Equi-Pak, which is for pour-in (don't they really mean "squeeze in"?)

    At any rate, good that whatever he did fixed your horse.



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