The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Results 1 to 18 of 18
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug. 25, 2009
    Posts
    25

    Default Anyone try Tildren?

    I'm getting ready to have my horse treated with Tildren. She's had right front lameness off and on FOREVER! Been diagnosed with navicular and shows some hock on bone scan. Just wondering what others experiences with Tildren may be?????



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep. 14, 2005
    Posts
    599

    Default

    My vet used Tildren for my horse just over a year ago. He had a right front suspensory strain but it was at the origin and the vet felt Tildren would help reduce any issues with the bone at the attachment area. We also did shockwave and a pretty conservative recovery time schedule so its hard to say how much, if any, effect it had. Fortunately my horse did have a very good recovery and seems to be feeling good all over with regards to his legs so I am happy enough with it. Since my guy is older, the vet felt that not only would it address any issues at the bone/suspensory origin, but it would also help him in general.

    Good luck, I hope it helps!



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan. 21, 2006
    Posts
    1,088

    Default

    There are a number of old threads on Tildren and a lot of debate about its benefits and long term risks.... Within the last couple of years there was a formal study underway - complete with a control group etc. I know that Fairfields Equine was a participant in the study but I do not know if it has been completed or what results were found.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec. 28, 2008
    Posts
    1,418

    Default

    I used it on one horse of mine and IMO it worked. Like others have said it's hard to say for sure whether or not the result was from the Tildren or what. Supposedly there is a several month lag b/t when you give the Tildren and when you see results from it since it is an osteoclast inhibitor (needs time to work). IME with it that is true. In any case I had a lame horse before Tildren and now I have a sound one so take that for what it's worth (not much ).



  5. #5
    Join Date
    May. 14, 2003
    Location
    7th grade land!
    Posts
    1,421

    Default

    We tried it as a last ditch effort to gain pasture soundess. It did not seem to do anything for my guy, but we had soooo many negatives going against us. It was a last hail mary, but did not work for us. I did leave him overnight with the vet, just incase there were adverse side effects or colic-the way my luck had been going, better to just pay the overnight fee then to risk the side effects. Murphy worked in our favor and there were no issues from it.
    Member-Arab Dressage Riders Clique
    RIP Barichello



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug. 25, 2009
    Posts
    25

    Default

    Thanks everyone!



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct. 13, 2002
    Location
    Idaho USA
    Posts
    1,974

    Default

    We have treated 2 with Tildren. One was about 3 years ago. He has been getting sounder and sounder and is back to work at the previous level. The other horse was recently treated, is already sound and should continue to improve for several months.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul. 18, 2006
    Posts
    436

    Default

    I have treated one of my horses with Tildren.

    This is as much as I can tell you. He was diagnosed with a navicular bone cyst. Small, but there. Six months later it was larger. We did a 10 day treatment of Tildren. Four months after that, through an MRI (not x rays) they couldn't see a cyst at all.

    So, there you have it.

    I have a question for those of you that have done or or to the OP. How many days of treatment do they do now? Through iv or shots?

    Back when I had it done, I believe it was done through iv shot once every day for 10 days. Since that time, I've heard different lengths of treatment.
    Last edited by blue&blond; Aug. 28, 2009 at 10:03 AM. Reason: Lapse in memory and posted wrong info



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec. 15, 2005
    Posts
    4,802

    Default

    We did the regional perfusions of Tildren where it is injected in a leg vein. It is much cheaper and sends more of the Tildren to the targeted area rather than the rest of the body.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug. 25, 2009
    Posts
    25

    Default

    I'm told it's a one time deal IV drip for 20 minutes OR you can do the 10 day thing. We're going with the one time IV and will pre-treat with banamine for potential colic. Although someone else told me it's not so much colic as it is kidney pain which is a bit scary, but it seems like any medical procedure these days - including those for humans - has some level of pain involved.
    Anyway, I'm very hopeful now. Thanks again to all who responded.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Dec. 28, 2008
    Posts
    1,418

    Default

    I prefer the one IV shot every day for 10 days over the IV bag method (put the whole amount in an IV bag and give it all at once). I like it since you don't have to place a catheter and less chance of blowing a vein. I do my own IV shots though so the cost is the same, would be much more expensive to pay a vet a farm call everyday for 10 days.

    My vet did a regional limb perfusion with Tildren on his personal horse and it worked really, really well. My horse never had such a cut and dry issue where we could target it so specifically so I went the IV injection route.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep. 8, 2007
    Posts
    2,917

    Default

    In the European studies the ten day treatment yielded the best results.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jul. 18, 2006
    Posts
    436

    Default

    Ok, now that it's morning and I'm not so tired.......

    You guys reminded me that my boy didn't have IV, he had the shots over a 10 day period. That's why he was there for 10 days (duh).

    I had to take him a few hours from home because at the time, local vets could not administer it. I believe it's more widely used now.



  14. #14
    Grandma Eeyore Guest

    Default Tildren worked for my horse

    It was confirmed September, 2008, my horse has navicular disease in both fronts. My vet told me about Tildren and made it very clear to me that it could or could not help him. My vet felt there had not been enough clinical study results to state with any certainty it would help. We did the treatment (we did the day long IV drip method), and along with the treatment, my horse wears special shoes and a 2 degree pad. I could not wait the full year to see if the Tildren worked and I had him x-rayed this past July. My hope was the Tildren had at least retarded the progression of the navicular. When my vet looked at the x-rays, his exact words were, “I would be very hard pressed to diagnose navicular in the left foot and the right foot has improved greatly”. I was amazed! Not only did the Tildren stop the progression of the navicular, but it repaired it as well. I do not know how many horses my vet has given the Tildren treatment to, but he did tell me there was one horse where there was no change at all. I do not know about any others.
    I believe the special shoes he wears (I have a reset done every six weeks) has also helped greatly as they relieve the pressure on the navicular bone.
    There is a concern with colic when Tildren is given through an IV, and my horse did get a tummy ache, but he did not colic. My horse gets tummy aches very easy so I was not worried and the vet kept him overnight just to make sure.
    I am taking my horse in tomorrow for his second Tildren treatment.
    I know this is a very pricey treatment, but if it works, it is worth every penny!



  15. #15
    Join Date
    May. 5, 2008
    Location
    8,750'
    Posts
    259

    Default

    We used it to treat my TB for Ringbone. I knew eventing and jumping would not be in his future anymore but was hoping he would be a trail horse and pasture sound.

    We did two treatments about 3-4 weeks apart from each other via the IV right at the pastern (I think this is the regional profusion).

    It did not work for him but it really does seem to be hit or miss depending on what it's used for, timing of the treatment, etc.

    Hoping it helps your pony!
    Ready ~ 1999-2009 ~ you were bigger than life!
    Stickers ~ 1985-2011 ~ Cody's BFF
    I miss you both very much!



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jul. 10, 2001
    Posts
    6,811

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by monday View Post
    ...the vet felt that not only would it address any issues at the bone/suspensory origin, but it would also help him in general.

    We did the regional perfusions of Tildren where it is injected in a leg vein. It is much cheaper and sends more of the Tildren to the targeted area rather than the rest of the body.

    Here are two misconceptions that vets and the layperson have concerning Tildren and bisphosphonates in general. This class of drug was SPECIFICALLY designed and engineered to bind to calcium anywhere and everywhere. That is what the phophonate group does. Then there is a toxic agent attached the the di-phosphate group.

    What does this mean? Regardless of route or location of administration, Tildren will take up residence in all bone tissue throughout the body. That is why certain other diseases show up when using this drug. Fracture healing is delayed, necrotic bone forms in the jaw etc. Bisphosphonates should have minimal effect in ligaments, tendons, or other tissues simply because they have very little structural calcium for them to bond to.

    Reed


    1 members found this post helpful.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Apr. 7, 2005
    Location
    With a dog named Rockstar
    Posts
    2,998

    Default

    Reed,
    I guess I wonder, how can it be approved? It sounds like it could have some horrible side effects. I guess it's a chance. I'll chat up my vet on Monday and see what if she recommends it at all. I imagine some use it as a total last ditch effort, despite potential side effects? Thanks.
    Margaret



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jul. 10, 2001
    Posts
    6,811

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by FatPalomino View Post
    Reed,
    I guess I wonder, how can it be approved? It sounds like it could have some horrible side effects. I guess it's a chance. I'll chat up my vet on Monday and see what if she recommends it at all. I imagine some use it as a total last ditch effort, despite potential side effects? Thanks.
    Margaret
    EVERY drug has horrible side effects, even if used correctly. Drugs are approved with the horrible side-effects at least somewhat understood.

    Medicine is the ART of statistics and probability. It is NOT definitive science. We are so far far from understanding biology/physiology it is like looking at a candle in a high wind in California while you are standing in New York.

    My post is meant as a warning sign to not expect miracles nor to take what the vets say as gospel. A vet/doctor weighs the risk versus reward when prescribing a drug or treatment. This is passed to the patient/owner who must also weigh the risk and rewards. Too many times companies, doctors, and laypeople claim that a certain drug/treatment/diet is the be-all fix it to all sorts of health problems.

    Bisphosphonates can help but their effects must be considered with a skeptical eye.



Similar Threads

  1. Tildren
    By delmarjump in forum Hunter/Jumper
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: Oct. 25, 2012, 10:20 AM
  2. Tildren
    By Invested1 in forum Horse Care
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: Oct. 14, 2011, 08:25 AM
  3. TILDREN
    By Iride in forum Horse Care
    Replies: 26
    Last Post: Mar. 15, 2011, 05:03 PM
  4. Tildren
    By Waltongirl in forum Horse Care
    Replies: 22
    Last Post: Mar. 25, 2010, 07:57 PM
  5. TILDREN-anyone
    By cottagefarm in forum Horse Care
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: Dec. 30, 2009, 08:46 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •