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  1. #1
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    Default Distances for bounces in gymnastics work?

    When setting bounces, how long do you set them at for trotting vs cantering? Does the height of the jump makes a difference?

    I've usually seen bounces set at 9' for trotting in, maybe longer for cantering. However I'm wondering how others set theirs.

    Is 9' meant for a bigger jump? Should it be shorter if the jumps are only 2'3 or 2'6 verticles, or even big crossrails?



  2. #2
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    I will go by the horse's stride as well. Typical is 9' for trot in, and anywhere from 10'-12' for cantering in. You might start at 12' and just do say two bounces in a row to judge how your horse will handle them, then take them in or out as needed. On a small horse I rode, who had a reasonably long stride and who liked to jump past his arc, we set them at 10-10.5', and it did well for him as well as the bigger horses. But, they were low in height, no more than 2'3-2'6".



  3. #3
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    we usually set them at 9' but then again, i'm on a lrg pony.

    maybe 10' - 11' for a horse?
    (|--Sarah--|)

    Blitz <3 & Leap of Faith <3



  4. #4
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    Basically it's 9 for trot and 12 for canter BUT that depends on the exercise. Trot is almost always 9 but the canter can go anything from 10 to 13 depending on all sorts of things.

    Most decent trainers and riders will go thru something low first and then MOVE the poles in and/or out as indicated by how the horse handles it. plus what you want to accomplish.

    And, yes, Nick, if they are lower jumps, they should come in a little as the jump will not carry them as far into that bounce as a larger jump does and you don't want to make them charge to get out of a bounce-the goal of that is rocking them back. I'd start at 21' for a 2'6" one stride off a trot over a pole 9' out. Try it once and move as needed. And yeah, I changed that, brain dead, not 21' for a friggen bounce.

    For the bounce, maybe, what, 12 or so feet off a trot in? try that one stride first and set so it's a little tight based on how he handles that one stride. I seem to recall 16' or so along the way somewhere but that was cantering in at 3'.
    Last edited by findeight; Aug. 24, 2009 at 01:39 PM.
    When opportunity knocks it's wearing overalls and looks like work.

    The horse world. Two people. Three opinions.



  5. #5
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    For trot-in bounces, I've usually done 9 feet, and for canter-in bounces, I've usually opted for 12 feet.

    My rationale for the 12' canter bounce follows from a bounce is a 'no stride' where the horse lands and immediately takes off. According to general distancing rules of 6 feet for landing and 6 feet for takeoff - you get a standard 12 foot bounce.

    I couldn't imagine doing a 16 foot bounce, seems like the horse would be REALLY gappy to the 'out' fence.



  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by *Liz* View Post
    I couldn't imagine doing a 16 foot bounce, seems like the horse would be REALLY gappy to the 'out' fence.
    You may be right, might have been 14' or so at 3' in off a very forward canter and followed by a one stride. Might be remembering the 16' from a 4' Jumper I used to school and lesson with and trainer would move the jump in or out for each. But not gappy at all IF you got in dead on and that was the point.

    But it was not 12', that is regular stride for a 3'er. It was alot more and you had to gun it getting to that first fence in. If you did, you coasted out with plenty. If not, you learned not to do that again.

    I should also say Warning. Do not try this at home. Stunt performed by qualified riders on advanced horses under proper supervision".

    Start closer and don't get too ambitious with gymnastics.
    When opportunity knocks it's wearing overalls and looks like work.

    The horse world. Two people. Three opinions.



  7. #7
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    We usually start with 9' or 12' (although I don't do a lot of cantering bounces), but it does depend on what the reason for the grid work is. If I want to teach them to land and be quiet, that is a different distance from one that needs to land and learn to go some where.

    With the youngsters, I want the distance comfortable until they are confident in the job. If that means shorter or longer, that's what we do.



  8. #8
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    From the Eventing cross country guidelines (the only place you will find a bounce in competition)
    For Prelim HT (speed is 520 mpm which is significantly faster than show jumpers, let alone show hunters- even though you slow down a bit for the bounce) the recommended height is 3'5" in 3'6" out.

    If on flat terrain the recommended distance is "15' flat".

    "Off significant turn and or uphill may reduce to 14’ distance accordingly."

    So I would expect a bounce at 3', out of a show hunter pace, would be LESS THAN 14'. Probably 13'6".
    Janet

    chief feeder and mucker for Music, Spy, Belle and Tiara. Someone else is now feeding and mucking for Chief and Brain (both foxhunting now).



  9. #9
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    If I am trotting in, and want a series of bounces, I put the first two about 9' apart to trot in, then the rest are about 11 or 12 feet apart, depending on what I am trying to accomplish (like Rio Tex said). Trot in, bounce, bounce, then a one stride is my favorite.



  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Janet View Post
    So I would expect a bounce at 3', out of a show hunter pace, would be LESS THAN 14'. Probably 13'6".
    Well, the exercise was to teach extension and not out of the regular show Hunter pace. It was out of a good gallop. Regular show Hunter pace for 3'6" would be about 13' to 13'6". It was stretchy to be sure on my 3'er but not hard once we mastered that gallop coming in and I quit picking up the reins a stride out. Well within limits.

    The forward bounce was followed by a still forward 2 stride at about 37' to a quiet 3 stride at 46 IIRC.
    When opportunity knocks it's wearing overalls and looks like work.

    The horse world. Two people. Three opinions.



  11. #11
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    Without going off on a tangent, gymnastics and bounces can be dangerous when not set properly. Most gymnastics are meant to be trotted into so that the striding is set properly. There is no room for recovery in a bounce.

    So.. be very careful setting up the striding. I suggest getting a copy of Linda Allens book of 101 Jumping Exercises for Horse and Rider. This book explains the reasons for the striding in the gymnastics set-up. The striding will also need to be adjusted for each particular horse and rider.

    A trot in bounce should be about 9 feet. Although I do not recommend cantering in, the suggested striding from this gymnastics book is 10-11 feet.

    The basic gymnastic set up described in this book is a trot-in cross rail, an 18 foot space (for a one-stride), then a low vertical.

    The book acknowledges that the spacing set on the gymnastic is set shorter than a traditional 12 foot stride, but it is set that way for a good reason. (To teach the horse to rock back, round, and collect).

    For starters, I would just set poles lying on the ground. This way, the striding can be adjusted, and there will be no danger if the striding is not optimal.



  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by WWYD? View Post
    For starters, I would just set poles lying on the ground. This way, the striding can be adjusted, and there will be no danger if the striding is not optimal.
    Bingo. We have a winner. Can't lose this way.

    Helps to understand what you are trying to accomplish as well, gymnastics can teach many things but you need to be clear on what you are expecting before you head into one.
    When opportunity knocks it's wearing overalls and looks like work.

    The horse world. Two people. Three opinions.



  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by WWYD? View Post
    So.. be very careful setting up the striding. I suggest getting a copy of Linda Allens book of 101 Jumping Exercises for Horse and Rider. This book explains the reasons for the striding in the gymnastics set-up. The striding will also need to be adjusted for each particular horse and rider.

    I've got the book, as does my normal trainer. My normal trainer sets the trot in at 9' and we rarely if ever canter in. Another, outside trainer had some recommendations for my horse, so I was curious of what others' experiences were. The goal for my horse in particular was to help him collect and rock back.



  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nickelodian View Post
    The goal for my horse in particular was to help him collect and rock back.
    Then you set short and use either high sided crossrails or small, square oxers to entice him to round and not drift and you sit and do nada.

    My problem was the opposite, I can cram a dozen strides in any line but HATE the leave outs or even more forward distances and I can get my horses backed off too much.

    Like I said, you need to understand what you want to accomplish with any excercise or gymnastic and start on the ground or real low and adjust to make sure the horse is comfortable enough to learn and not scare themselves-and you.
    When opportunity knocks it's wearing overalls and looks like work.

    The horse world. Two people. Three opinions.



  15. #15
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    I suspect with your gigantic creature that much of the work can be accomplished with flat work and trotting bigger jumps with emphasis on getting really to the base. Of course, I have not seen go in a long time.



  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by RioTex View Post
    I suspect with your gigantic creature that much of the work can be accomplished with flat work and trotting bigger jumps with emphasis on getting really to the base. Of course, I have not seen go in a long time.
    I'm bringing him to Manor to get him out before Tyler, and do the 3'3, will you be there? I have a very hard time keeping him collected from nose to tail when on course. I can't imagine why being out weighed 16-1 .



  17. #17
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    I think we are headed to Pine Hill that weekend. I can't imagine you keeping him put together either. He is one BIG boy and one are one TINY girl. I suspect it will come with time as he gets more and more broke and responds to your aids without having to have a whole slow WB thought process.



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