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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr. 28, 2009
    Posts
    2,108

    Default EEK! Barn is being delivered and not ready

    Well... we dropped the ball a little. I just got a phone call that our barn materials are being delivered next wednesday and they usually start building anywhere from 3-7 days after that. We don't have any site prep done. Our house flooded 2 weeks ago from a plumbing problem and it has been complete.mass.chaos around here every day since then. All of our floors ripped out, insurance wars, etc. Getting to the point... can anyone tell me what went into their site prep? DH is going to call a couple of excavators pronto tonight to look into it and see if there's time. Has anyone put a barn up on level ground without site prep? We had one interesting fellow out here who said our ground was as level as it gets but did not actually check it. I see pole barns going in all of the time without site prep, so I guess I just don't really know the difference. The first weird excavator we had out just said to have the barn put up whenever and he could add fill, etc. inside once it's done. So confused... Whoever said building a barn to bring your horses home was fun lied.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep. 2, 2005
    Location
    Upstate NY
    Posts
    13,495

    Default

    Site prep is one of the things not to skimp on when building a barn. It is pretty hard to fix drainage and such after the building is already there.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul. 5, 2007
    Location
    Beside Myself ~ Western NY
    Posts
    8,127

    Default

    Just have them deliver it to me... I'll improvise.

    Basically, the maintenance of your site for ever after depends a whole lot on the thought and quality of work (and money) put into the preparation. If you put a pole barn up on an otherwise decent piece of land, yes, they can fill in and around it. What you get is basically a barn hovering two feet above the ground, and they put bank run around it.

    If you already have drainage issues, have clay ground, major slopes etc, then the barn hovering two feet above the ground is probably going to let you down in the future. My husband is constantly complaining that the thousands and thousands of dollars we sink into the ground are never going to be appreciated (by the casual onlooker). I, on the other hand, am immensley appreciative of the good drainage and lovely topsoil. It has been a long time since I saw a mud puddle on our property. My mother's farm, on the other hand... yikes. I refuse to wear good shoes to her place because the driveway is often impassable!

    To eloborate, what would I expect to see in good site preparation?
    Driveway and parking area with appropriate drainage and gravel.
    Barn area leveled and any existing water issues corrected with drain.
    You would also probably elevate the existing site a bit. My mother got the hovering barn, and the inisde was simply never filled in to the correct level, and the underside of the stalls had to be added to to meet the grade.
    Filling inside an existing structure is often serious manual labor. Easier to do it before building with heavy machinery, even if you do have a guy with a BobCat who swears he can get into the corners.
    Quote Originally Posted by Crockpot View Post
    So much stupid, so little time.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr. 28, 2009
    Posts
    2,108

    Default

    Thanks for all the info. We are in Indiana and I don't know of anywhere around here that DOESN'T have clay. But it's not horrible. There is no standing water. Our property must be slightly graded (not intentionally I'm sure) to the opposite side of where the barn is gowing because we get all the farmer's run-off and a lake when it rains. Nothing where the barn is going though. All we have is a 24x40 barn and 8' overhangs on both sides of the 24' length- no driveway or parking area. Just our little ol' backyard barn.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar. 6, 2009
    Posts
    9,030

    Default

    Never under-estimate the importance of site preparation for a building ~ any building ~ "good dirt work" will prevent big problems later.
    Zu Zu Bailey " IT"S A WONDERFUL LIFE !"



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2000
    Location
    MA
    Posts
    12,995

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by trubandloki View Post
    Site prep is one of the things not to skimp on when building a barn. It is pretty hard to fix drainage and such after the building is already there.
    What. She. Said.

    Just spent much $ and sweat fixing some things that shouldn't have been such a problem.
    "It's like a Russian nesting doll of train wrecks."--CaitlinandTheBay

    ...just settin' on the Group W bench.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan. 31, 2009
    Location
    It's a little more country than that
    Posts
    315

    Default

    Just because you do not have standing water does not mean that without site prep you will not have water flowing through your barn any time there is heavy rain.

    When a river runs through it, it is annoying... ask me how I know... BOTH barns I have boarded at - major flowing water issues.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr. 28, 2009
    Posts
    2,108

    Default

    Thanks. I get that I need proper site prep. Hoping maybe for a flicker of a second it was something that could be dealt with after but I knew that was a dream. My main question is though, what constitutes proper site prep?



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    44,597

    Default

    Speaking in general terms, you want a pad to build on.

    A pad means ground at least 12" above grade and the sides sloping just right into whatever direction you want the water to go, access to the pad all around and especially where you may have openings.

    That pad should be built to specifications for your area, tamped every few inches and once finished, tested to over 96% compaction by a licensed testing firm.

    That is what is required around here to even get building permits to start building and I have heard it is so most every place and definitely a bank requirement if you have a loan on that building.
    Banks don't like to lend money on a building that may fall down or float away.

    This goes to show you how important site preparation is for any building, even "just" a barn.



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