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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul. 2, 2009
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    Minnesota
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    Default Clinic on a borrowed horse?

    Anyone ever clinic on a borrowed horse? I want to do one of the USEF Para Clinics which are all east coast or west coast so far but I am in the midwest and it would be very hard to bring my horse on a two day one way trailer trip for a one day clinic. I'm doing some clinics this winter on my own horse with Janet Foy, one with Debbie McDonald in the spring, and maybe one with Missy Ransehousen, who is a Para Team Coach, if the person who wants to host can get a date set. One of my long term goals is to ride for the US Para Team, but I am kind of isolated here in Minnesota, which would mean I would be under the radar. I'm hoping to develop the first level and para FEI movements on my horse this winter, and then maybe borrow a horse to ride in one of the para clinics. When I get to that point I would have to find a horse to borrow unless the offer something that is within a day long drive. If you have ridden in a clinic on a borrowed horse, what was your experience like?



  2. #2
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    Nov. 2, 2001
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    Default

    Hmmm, you are not even sure you can get a horse....in that case I would think auditing is more sensible.
    Quote Originally Posted by fargaloo View Post
    Do you not understand how asking "why now?" is EXACTLY part of the reason why assault victims feel silenced?



  3. #3
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    Jan. 10, 2002
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    Area VIII, Region 2, Zone 5.
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    Default

    I'm thinking that for your purposes, to get seen and known as a Para Team hopeful, this could be a great idea. Or, of course, it could backfire. If you can find a horse to borrow that has some Para experience, and get there enough time in advance to ride the horse a few times before the clinic, I think it would be an impressive showing of your desire and determination.
    Quote Originally Posted by SuzieQNutter
    The whip is held across your thigh so as you can still hold the reins without spilling your coffee!!
    SillyHorse adds: Or your wine.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr. 1, 2003
    Location
    Cocoa, Fla
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    Default

    I've always ridden my own horse at clinics but my trainer borrowed my horse for a clinic when her was being re-habbed from an injury.

    Why not have your trainer take a video of your riding - showing your capabilities then contact people in the region (maybe GMO?) and see if anyone has a horse they will lend you which is safe enough for you and matches your capabilities. Best to ride tyhat horse a few times before the clinic (take lessons) so you're not totally on an unknown entity.
    Sandy in Fla.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct. 6, 2005
    Location
    Kitchener, Ontario
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    45

    Default

    Last year when my horse injured his suspensory, I rode 2 borrowed horses in a 3 day clinic with Britta Johnston. The first horse I had ridden a few times with my coach. The second I had never even seen prior to the clinic.

    My experience was very positive with both horses. I was a little more familiar with the first horse having ridden him prior to the clinic. The clinician knew that this was my first experience with the second horse and gave me 10-15 minutes to warmup and get a feel for him. She evaluated both of us during this warmup period and came up with a lesson plan at that time.

    I quite enjoy riding different horses and I think it is quite valuable to solidify your skills on any horse that you ride. It was also great because each horse was quite different. The first was an appendix quarter horse doing 2nd/3rd level. The second was a 6 yo Trakehner, probably a 1st/2nd level horse, but had a lot of potential. (we actually played a little during my lesson with the beginnings of piaffe).

    It may have been a little different for me as I have ridden with Britta prior to the clinic and she is aware of my riding level and limitations.

    Good luck with whichever option you chose (auditing or riding)!



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul. 2, 2009
    Location
    Minnesota
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    109

    Default

    Thanks for your thoughts, right now I'm working in hypotheticals, this is something I want to do six months to a year from now but another thread and a friend of mine who recently did a clinic with Felicitas von Neumann on a borrowed horse got me thinking about it. Obviously, it is not ideal to not be riding your own horse, but if all the USEF clinics are 16 hours plus away for me, makes it very impractical and expensive for one day.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul. 27, 2007
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    Behind the Orange Curtain
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    Default

    I would definitely want to ride the horse before the clinic to make sure you get along. With your left hand issues, some horses (who aren't used to it) could get fussy and that would be a huge bummer



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct. 3, 2002
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    it's not the edge of the earth, but you can see it from here
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    Default

    I think this is part of the networking we need.

    For example, I would be happy to lend a couple of my horses for such a clinic. One is working nicely in 3rd (when fit!) and another will be ready to go first by the end of the fall. All are good rides for the differently abled, and I'm specifically starting to think bringing horses along for Para-dressage is a niche I can fill nicely in addition to the SO stuff. I'm slightly more than 4 hrs from Boston.

    I'm sure there are others of us out here. This is *exactly* the networking type of thing that Dressage Geek and Equine Artworks and myself a talking about and brainstorming.

    I think another huge need is scholarships. Whether it's to defray the cost of a clinic or of travel.

    We just need to find a way to get on the same page and get talking to each other.
    InnisFailte Pinto Sporthorses & Coloured Cobs
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    Bits are like cats, what's one more? (Petstorejunkie)



  9. #9
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    I am having my head up my bum this morning...

    OK, after I actually read for comprehension

    Those events are a long way down the road (oh I love when I make cheap puns, not even intended)

    That should give you time to work the grapevines.

    true, showing up on your own horse would be best, but having a solid loaner would be an acceptable alternative.

    This could be the beginning of something good!
    Quote Originally Posted by fargaloo View Post
    Do you not understand how asking "why now?" is EXACTLY part of the reason why assault victims feel silenced?



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb. 5, 2002
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    2,072

    Default

    Turn it into an opportunity! I know the whole push, in the past few years, has been to have the para team bring its own horses, but in the past it was all about catch riding. The cost of shipping your own horse all over the country is going to be ridiculous. You'll probably have to do more catch riding than you'd like if this is your goal, so decide now that you're going to get good at it! Take any chance you can get to ride other horses, in addition to your own.

    It was quite a while ago but people lent some AWESOME horses for NAYRC and NARHA nationals when I volunteered there - horses that were way nicer than anything I got to ride at home! We weren't allowed to even sit on them (sigh...), only their designated riders. And people hauled them some pretty good distances to allow others to use them. I wouldn't be surprised if the organizers will be able to come up with something for you to ride at the clinics if you ask early enough and maybe have someone else put in a good word for you.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    May. 2, 2002
    Posts
    1,312

    Talking I'm trying it

    I am flying to Virginia next month and doing a clinic with Missy on a borrowed horse at a farm in Maryland. I have a lame horse and 2 barely broke horses, so even if there was a clinic in my area I would have to borrow a horse. At this point, I am not even sure which horse I am riding. Robin, my wonderful and dear friend, is being kind enough to provide me with a mount.

    I will let you know how it goes. I am super excited to work with Missy and watch her teach others. I can't wait to go!!!!



  12. #12
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    May. 14, 2003
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    Sixth Grade Land!!! USA
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    Default

    My current "project's" dam and grand dam were both in the "borrowed horses" catagory for the 1996 Para-Olympics in Conyers, GA. The grand dam had already been approved for use and they came up short horses and asked if my friend had any more they could use-My horses's dam evidently she was the youngest horse there, just over 6. The rider was Norwegian and not sure if she could compete or not, as she evidently drew a very high number for horse selection. She had a ball with the mare and really really liked her.
    Member-Arab Dressage Riders Clique
    RIP Barichello



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug. 21, 2000
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    USA
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    Default

    Riding on a borrowed horse, in this scenario, isn't something to sweat so much. It is common for participants the para clinics to use borrowed horses. Often the clinics are set up with the availability of loaner horses in mind, knowing many riders are in your same situation and likely unable to ship their own horse a great distance to attend. Obviously you'd be more at home on your own horse, but rest assured that Missy is VERY used to seeing people ride borrowed horses and can recognize talent (or lack thereof) whether you are riding your own horse or someone else's.

    People are talking a lot about networking - which is ALWAYS a good idea - but there shouldn't be any need to re-invent the wheel when it comes to para. Anyone involved with the program (the clinic organizer, a program participant, Pam Lane, Missy Ransehousen, etc.) should have been able to reassure you that it's OK -- and even pretty standard -- to ride a loaner in these clinics. Did you pose your questions to those folks first? Going straight to the horse's mouth should give you the most accurate answer and spare you any unnecessary stress.
    I evented just for the Halibut.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    May. 17, 2003
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    5,641

    Default

    Yes, I did one this spring--I had paid for it, my horse came up lame the day before. I was very kindly lent a lovely Lusitano stallion, who I had never ridden before, on the moring of the clinic. Once I got over myself, it was a great experience and really good for my riding, especially as I am one who is reluctant to ride strange horses!



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jul. 2, 2009
    Location
    Minnesota
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by NeverTime View Post
    Riding on a borrowed horse, in this scenario, isn't something to sweat so much. It is common for participants the para clinics to use borrowed horses. Often the clinics are set up with the availability of loaner horses in mind, knowing many riders are in your same situation and likely unable to ship their own horse a great distance to attend. Obviously you'd be more at home on your own horse, but rest assured that Missy is VERY used to seeing people ride borrowed horses and can recognize talent (or lack thereof) whether you are riding your own horse or someone else's.

    People are talking a lot about networking - which is ALWAYS a good idea - but there shouldn't be any need to re-invent the wheel when it comes to para. Anyone involved with the program (the clinic organizer, a program participant, Pam Lane, Missy Ransehousen, etc.) should have been able to reassure you that it's OK -- and even pretty standard -- to ride a loaner in these clinics. Did you pose your questions to those folks first? Going straight to the horse's mouth should give you the most accurate answer and spare you any unnecessary stress.
    I'm still in the planning stages. I didn't want to be a bother to anybody until I'm closer to riding at first level, which is the equivilent to my grade. I'm showing Training 3 and 4 right now, and I think with a lot of hard work this winter I can be showing Grade III and First next summer. Thanks for you thoughts, this gives me a lot more confidence.



  16. #16
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    Apr. 15, 2008
    Location
    Orlean, Va
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    2,060

    Default Beginner's Mind

    NeverTime,

    We haven't been part of para yet, so we haven't learned enough to know what we don't know. Some of us aren't para eligible because we don't fit the classifications, but we still aren't regular able riders. I think that with your input, we will learn a lot in a short time. We need to know that it is ok to contact Pam Lane, and the Ransehousens. We don't want to bother them as important busy people. It hurts to be rejected and if we aren't part of it, it takes courage to go out on a limb.

    Please explain more, since we are beginners at this. The thread has only been alive since August 3. We do need to ask them if there is someone who will act as spokesperson.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Feb. 9, 2003
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    349

    Default

    I say go for it. Borrowing a horse is a great opputunity. You would try to arrange to ride the horse a day or so in advance of the clinic. I have had to borrow horses for competitions. It would be no different.
    Frogs in a Basket. Oh, one jumped out.
    EC Level 1 Coach, ARIA Level 3 Dressage Coach
    www.dressagelife.com
    http://piaffing.blogspot.com/



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Feb. 9, 2003
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    349

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by whicker View Post
    NeverTime,

    We haven't been part of para yet, so we haven't learned enough to know what we don't know. Some of us aren't para eligible because we don't fit the classifications, but we still aren't regular able riders. I think that with your input, we will learn a lot in a short time. We need to know that it is ok to contact Pam Lane, and the Ransehousens. We don't want to bother them as important busy people. It hurts to be rejected and if we aren't part of it, it takes courage to go out on a limb.

    Please explain more, since we are beginners at this. The thread has only been alive since August 3. We do need to ask them if there is someone who will act as spokesperson.

    Can I ask what the disability is and why it didn't fit in the classification?
    Frogs in a Basket. Oh, one jumped out.
    EC Level 1 Coach, ARIA Level 3 Dressage Coach
    www.dressagelife.com
    http://piaffing.blogspot.com/



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Aug. 21, 2000
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    2,643

    Default Competitive paraequestrian

    I think the USDF Web site does a better job of outreach than the USEF site which, IMO, is fairly difficult to navigate and seems to be geared more toward those already involved in the program than those interested in becoming involved.
    The USDF site has a great para page with answers to lots of frequently asked questions about everything from how to compete as a paraequestrian in national-level shows to how to qualify for the US Paralympic Team.*
    If you have specific questions after you've been there, check out the members of the USDF paraequestrian committee and see if one lives near you (geographic proximity makes finding instructors, etc. so much easier), if not, I'd say call any of 'em and bug 'em. The job of their committee is "to increase visibility and comprehension for the available programs for competitive dressage riders with physical disabilities" -- essentially, their role is to answer questions just like yours, so don't be afraid to ask! The chairwoman of the committee, Hope Hand, is super-involved in all levels of the sport and is a former para competitor herself.

    * From what I've seen from the members of the US Paralympic Team, it does bear noting that getting to that level can be as difficult for a disabled rider as getting to the Olympics can be for an able-bodied rider. The caliber of the horses now used in international para competition is breathtaking and intimidating: Far from being therapeutic riding horses, these are serious dressage horses -- in Beijing last year, one of the Australian (?) para athletes was mounted on a horse who was the traveling alternate for her country's Olympic dressage team! And the level of riding isn't quite the direct translation that the FEI team and individual tests indicate: Grade III may be equivalent to First Level, but the winning freestyles at that level include far more advanced movements. So it's seriously competitive, and not everybody is interested in getting that hard-core about their riding.

    Thankfully, it's not as if it is a 0-to-60 proposition where you either don't compete at all or make the Team. You can apply to the USEF for a dispensation certificate to allow you to use compensating aides (two whips, for example) in regular national-level dressage classes. Plus, national shows can offer Para tests, and are encouraged to do so as Test of Choice classes. (If your local dressage show organizer thinks you are crazy for suggesting such a thing, show her this.) For folks in California, there are a whole series of team-run training sessions coming up this fall and winter in California and Washington state to check out.

    That's probably repeating a lot of what people have said already and strays far from Ellie's original question, but the idea is that there ARE some fairly good resources out there to get you started, and there are lots of people available to be your first contact, should you decided you want to get involved in the high-performance paraequestrian.
    I evented just for the Halibut.



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jul. 2, 2009
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    109

    Default

    Thanks for the help Nevertime. I know Lloyd Landkamer fairly well, who is the para USDF board member for my region. The Janet Foy clinic I am doing in October is at Brandywine Farm, which is run by Lloyd and Bill Bill Solyntjes. I have my FEI classification as Grade III, but I just made the move to dressage this year and I am showing Training Level test 3 and 4. I'm grateful for my dispensations, and take full advantage of them From what I understand Grade III is pretty small division, there are only 4 people from the US ranked in the standings that just came out. I've got a great horse, I feel that if I can put in the work this winter I'll be ready for the para FEI next year.



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