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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May. 21, 2009
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    78

    Default What do you use for your horses stall floor?

    I was just wondering what people use for their stall floors. I heard grid mats work well with horses. Is that true or do they have some major faults to them? Thanks
    ~He dares to be a fool, and that is the first step in the direction of wisdom~
    -James Huneker



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct. 16, 2008
    Location
    Central Oklahoma
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    We have those one-piece monster rubber mat on concrete floor. The concrete floor allows the base where the mat is to lay on to be perfectly level and horses can not dig a hole through it. The one-piece rubber mat has no seam so horses cannot paw at it and lift it to allow bedding to go under it (huge pain to muck).

    Unless you have very good drainage in your stalls, any styles that are designed to allow urine to soak into the ground will have ammonia problem. Well, actually even if your stalls have good drainage, you will probably still have ammonia problem...



  3. #3
    Join Date
    May. 21, 2009
    Posts
    78

    Default

    That sounds good. Are there any problems with the mat? Are there any specific brands you prefer? Thanks
    ~He dares to be a fool, and that is the first step in the direction of wisdom~
    -James Huneker



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct. 4, 2008
    Posts
    745

    Default

    We have yhe 4X6/ 5X7 rubber mats over stone and clay. I do like it. We clean stalls 2x day, 7 days per week, so they are always nice.

    My only complaint is that because there are seams; we are often pulling shavings out from under certain horses mats.

    Our mats came from a local rubber company.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug. 25, 2007
    Posts
    11,019

    Default

    Concrete foundation with drains, crushed limestone on top, 2x6 treated boards on top of that, bedded in shavings/sawdust (whichever is available).

    Some also have rubber mats put down by our tennant.

    G.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan. 16, 2002
    Location
    West Coast of Michigan
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    36,321

    Default

    Stall Skins over sand/crushed concrete. No cushion with these, but if you have a good drainage base this setup saves a lot of bedding. Light and easy to install, too.
    Click here before you buy.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2003
    Location
    NorthEast
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    24,955

    Default

    4x6 1" mats over packed process stone. When the barn was built we had the entire foundation filled up to floor level with process and then had bulldozer Phil pack and level the living snot out of it. So the "floor" is a little over 3' deep (I think) of packed process. *Awesome* drainage, no dirt in the mix to trap and hold urine smells. I can actually dump water bucket in the aisle (aisle is matted also) or hose it down and it drains away in a couple minutes through the seams of the mats.
    Love the mats...with the process packed so well and levelled my mats haven't curled or gotten lumpy in almost 6 years...despite having had a 1600+ lb stall weaver/walker. However sometimes in one stall only the edge of one mat will lift a bit when the gelding does his Rocket Impression when exiting his stall and then bedding does get under it. I just lift that corner and scrape it back out. But there isn't one bit of ammonia smell or even dampness under those mats. LOVE the flooring.
    However I would think that trying to do this deep of a packed flooring on an already existing barn would be a PITA due to having to dig out inside the stallls that deep and then trying to load in the process and packing it. But if you're building new, consider trying it.
    With mats you'll want to use deeper bedding if using large cut shavings though, otherwise urine pools on the mats. Large cut shavings look great but don't absorb worth crap. But with pelleted, swadust or very fine cut shavings mats work wonderful.
    Grids are really nice too, they stop stall diggers. But bedding packs into the grids and then that gets soaked with urine and they tend to smell. Or urine soaks through to dirt floors underneath and makes the dirt smell. But that can be countered with Sweet PDZ or some other odor neutralizer.
    You jump in the saddle,
    Hold onto the bridle!
    Jump in the line!
    ...Belefonte



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec. 31, 2007
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    AreaII
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    1,351

    Default

    When building the barn, we built the base up 12" in the front and almost 36" in the back. So there are 40 truckloads of fill under the barn! Packed that down, built barn, added stone dust, again tamped and leveled. Then added 3/4" 4x6 mats wall to wall. They are in there super tight! After 6 years, there are 2 stalls where the horses have lifted the corners of one/two mats and we had to go in and muck under it, relevel, etc- but it's not been too bad.
    I bed on sawdust and the stalls are very easy to clean!

    I would think the grid mats with holes in them would be a nightmare to clean- with all the junk falling in the holes and seeping into the ground/base. (if that is the kind you were referring to?).



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr. 2, 2008
    Location
    Virginia
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    1,378

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    12x12 stalls with 2 foot concrete "apron" and 10x10 interlocking mats set in flush with concrete. Hard packed stone dust is under the mats.

    No moving or bulging with the mats, no digging in corners or holes on either side of the door.

    Aisleway is same setup.
    Last edited by KnKShowmom; Aug. 20, 2009 at 09:46 AM. Reason: edit



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2000
    Location
    MA
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    13,220

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    Quote Originally Posted by KnKShowmom View Post
    12x12 stalls with 2 foot concrete "apron" and 10x10 interlocking mats set in flush with concrete. Hard packed stone dust is under the mats.

    No moving or bulging with the mats, no digging in corners or holes on either side of the door.

    Aisleway is same setup.
    I *like* this idea--I'm filing it for the next barn I build.

    I have tamped stone dust with rubber mats.
    I'm halfway through releveling and relaying the existing mats. Last done about 4 years ago.
    "It's like a Russian nesting doll of train wrecks."--CaitlinandTheBay

    ...just settin' on the Group W bench.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Apr. 8, 2005
    Location
    Kentucky
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    The base on mine is stonedust and lime. This alone worked fine for a couple of years, but as stalls are cleaned more and more of the base gets removed. Eventually the level of the stalls is lower than outside and extremely heavy rains = flooded stalls= not a lot of fun.

    One stall has a wood floor (2" oak planks laid tightly over the base) and some have rubber mats. While the mats are nice and easier to remove to re-level the base, I actually prefer the wood. Much of the urine drains through the cracks b/w the planks and the stall stays very dry. The mats tend to sweat and get nasty in humid weather unless I bed very deeply, and since I've been having a hard time getting sawdust, the stalls aren't bedded as heavily as I would like.

    I would never use concrete as a base. I've worked on concrete and no matter how thick and cushiony the rubber mats were, my feet, legs and back knew that there was concrete underneath.

    ETA- a friend had stall grids in a couple of his stalls and they work great. I'd love to have them but they're a little too expensive for my budget.



  12. #12
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    Apr. 2, 2008
    Location
    Virginia
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    Default

    Thanks!

    It was my way of trying to have the best of both worlds and I have no complaints!



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Oct. 16, 2008
    Location
    Central Oklahoma
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    Quote Originally Posted by HowDoYouLikeMeNow View Post
    That sounds good. Are there any problems with the mat? Are there any specific brands you prefer? Thanks
    We got ours from Linear Rubber. We customed order them because ours are odd sizes (15'x16') and I wanted them to fit snugly. They come in rolled and are huge pain to move because of the weight. We ended up using the tractor to dump it to the corner of the stall and manually drag it around so the corner of the mat align with the corner of the stalls. Once that is done. It is a breeze. Just unroll it and voila. Except for the weight which can be troublesome, I actually felt it was easier to install than the regular 4x6 mats. The rolled form provides a good solid grib for you to maneuver. The 4x6 mats, well, they are limpy and offer you no place to hold on to.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Mar. 29, 2008
    Location
    Washington State
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    163

    Default

    I have 12 x 12 stalls with 5/8 minus base. The base is compacted and we put 4 x 6 1" rubber matts in each stall. We occassionally have to clean the bedding out from the seams. Theses stalls open to pastures where the horses spend most of their time - no ammonia problems here!!



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Aug. 28, 2006
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    10,989

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    Interlocking mats over dirt has worked for us. I think they've been down for 7 years now -- they're even in a run-in shelter that in the past has doubled for a stall.



  16. #16
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    Jan. 16, 2009
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    Four Corners
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    Default

    I haven't been entirely happy with the interlocking mats that are 4X4 and something like 12 pounds each. They're marketed as something you can move, but the first time I pulled them up when I tried to get them back together very few of the teeth met back up properly.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    May. 21, 2009
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    78

    Default

    I heard wood stalls do work very well. But I also heard it is really expensive to install and gets a little slippery when it gets wet/urine on it.
    ~He dares to be a fool, and that is the first step in the direction of wisdom~
    -James Huneker



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Apr. 8, 2005
    Location
    Kentucky
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    4,580

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by HowDoYouLikeMeNow View Post
    I heard wood stalls do work very well. But I also heard it is really expensive to install and gets a little slippery when it gets wet/urine on it.
    Nope, not expensive. Actually about half the cost of TSC mats. Installation isn't hard either- all you do is lay the full length boards tightly over a packed stonedust base and fill the cracks with more stonedust. You may have to cut around posts or doorways but that's no biggie. They're not nailed down or fastened in any way- their own weight holds them in place. The worst part about wood floors is going to the (Amish) sawmill to order the full 2" thick boards (white oak here), returning to pick them up, and unloading the monster planks that weigh a ton. Any idiot that can read a tape measure, make a simple cut with a circular saw, and has a strong back can install a wood floor.

    As for slippery, I think the rubber mats are much more slippery than the wood ever gets.



  19. #19
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    Aug. 28, 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by Desert Topaz View Post
    I haven't been entirely happy with the interlocking mats that are 4X4 and something like 12 pounds each. They're marketed as something you can move, but the first time I pulled them up when I tried to get them back together very few of the teeth met back up properly.
    Our interlocking mats are 4 x 6' and very heavy. We used a mallet to pound the teeth into the sockets and they haven't moved since.



  20. #20
    Join Date
    May. 21, 2009
    Posts
    78

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by shakeytails View Post
    Nope, not expensive. Actually about half the cost of TSC mats. Installation isn't hard either- all you do is lay the full length boards tightly over a packed stonedust base and fill the cracks with more stonedust. You may have to cut around posts or doorways but that's no biggie. They're not nailed down or fastened in any way- their own weight holds them in place. The worst part about wood floors is going to the (Amish) sawmill to order the full 2" thick boards (white oak here), returning to pick them up, and unloading the monster planks that weigh a ton. Any idiot that can read a tape measure, make a simple cut with a circular saw, and has a strong back can install a wood floor.

    As for slippery, I think the rubber mats are much more slippery than the wood ever gets.
    But I also read if would stalls aren't installed properly, that it is prone to insects. Has anyone had a problem with bugs?
    ~He dares to be a fool, and that is the first step in the direction of wisdom~
    -James Huneker



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