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  1. #1
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    Question ethical dilemma re horse rescue

    what do you in a situation where an individual who you know as someone who provides less than average quality care for her horses, whose horses have been known to look considerably underweight and not get veterinary care on regular basis (or in case of emergencies even) and whose horse keeping in general leaves a lot to be desired is inquiring about adopting a horse from a rescue?

    is a death sentence at that point better than the alternative? or does the possibility that this person will give the horse a few extra years of life outweigh the fact that it'll receive spotty care at best?
    http://www.eponashoe.com/
    TQ(Trail Queen) \"Learn How to Ride or Move Over!!\" Clique



  2. #2
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    I think if the rescue does their homework, they will not allow this person to adopt.
    Save lives! Adopt a pet from your local shelter.



  3. #3
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    Default

    We would not adopt a horse to that person, truthfully......we want our horses to be in a better place, not just any place......



  4. #4
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    I would not adopt a horse to someone like that- mainly because I think often times people neglect due to a lack of money...and does she need another bill and are you then creating a bad situation for your rescue horse PLUS a worse situation for her existing horse.

    Though.... I think sometimes there can be a range of care in which horses can be happy. Lots of barns have horses a little thin in the winter, sometimes it is simply hard to afford enough hay and grain to have them in great weight. Lots of people let feet get long between shoeings. Lots of people vaccinate and worm on a less frequent schedule. Lots of people let small lameness issues heal themselves or look the other way. Lots of people try to avoid a vet call. Horse care does run the gamut from people willing to spend anything, to those who only provide basics and come up short. I've seen both kinds and *honestly* sometimes the ones cared for a little less carefully seem happier.

    So is spotty care- the horse might not get fed daily? Or it might not get vaccines in the spring? Is it that the owner stretches out a trim job 8-10 weeks on horses that don't work or that the owner stretches a trim job 8-10 months? Is it that a bad cut gets cleaned out and furazoned and wrapped with no vet or that a giant gash is left to fester untreated?



  5. #5
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    Nov. 15, 2005
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    'is a death sentence at that point better than the alternative?'
    Why is death or this less than stellar person the only choices?

    Is your question whether you should tell the rescue what you know about her and her horse care?



  6. #6
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    Jun. 22, 2007
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    Default

    From your description, it sounds as though this person may have animal hoarding tendencies...Not properly taking care of what she has, yet wanting to take in more animals.

    I knew of a person like this, she, and her mother, owned 14 horses and ponies, several were quite lame-and not going to ever get better, and they bred one poor post-legged little mare over and over, "to get a filly", they ended up with 9 colts in a row. I got wind of them wanting to take in a mutual friends' retiring show horse, who was a real sweetheart. I quietly gave this person a call, explained the circumstances of their present animals' situation/living conditions, and after quite a runaround, she finally got to visit their present charges (spread out between three ramshackle barns). She refused to adopt out to them, found her old boy a much better situation.

    Do the right thing. Make a phone call, at least. You just do it in a calm, rational way, and state what you know about her present animals. The rescue will take it from there.



  7. #7
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    Sep. 10, 2008
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    Default

    If it were me, I would inform the rescue to be extra diligent about their facility check. Chances are, if it is how you portray it, if they are at all thorough they won't approve. But it wouldn't hurt to give them a heads up. I wouldn't drag anyone's name through the mud, and make sure they will let you remain anonymous.



  8. #8
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    Jul. 21, 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by marta View Post
    what do you in a situation where an individual who you know as someone who provides less than average quality care for her horses, whose horses have been known to look considerably underweight and not get veterinary care on regular basis (or in case of emergencies even) and whose horse keeping in general leaves a lot to be desired is inquiring about adopting a horse from a rescue?
    Sounds pretty grim to me - especially the part about not calling the vet in emergencies.

    What do you know about the rescue? Can you contact them?

    First I'd ask to make sure the person actually has applied to adopt. The rescue may or may not answer your question.

    No matter the answer, I would then ask what kind of vetting procedure the rescue uses for potential adopters. E.g. Do you do a home visit? Do you ask for vet references? Do you ask for personal references? Do you check on [whatever you think would be especially important in this case]Etc.

    Unless the rescue is just thick as a brick, that should put them on their guard sufficiently. And all you did was ask some questions.



  9. #9
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    Default let me clear something up

    the reason the above options are the only options in this case is b/c the horse is in the kill pen and the rescue is full. rescue is looking for someone to take the horse. so if this individual inquired w/ the rescue about this type of horse specifically, the rescue would then get the horse from the kill pen since they would have a home for it and adopt it out to this individual. otherwise, the horse remains in the kill pen and we all pray it gets picked up by someone before they ship them off.
    http://www.eponashoe.com/
    TQ(Trail Queen) \"Learn How to Ride or Move Over!!\" Clique



  10. #10
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    Would the killpen be Camelot in NJ by any chance? I know that I received an email alert that there were a few horses there and as a last ditch effort- an attempt to locate any homes.



  11. #11
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    Default yes marli

    that would be the one.
    http://www.eponashoe.com/
    TQ(Trail Queen) \"Learn How to Ride or Move Over!!\" Clique



  12. #12
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    Default spurgirl

    you called it.
    in my OP i nearly referred to her as a hoarder. she definitely fits the profile. but she runs a boarding operation and a lesson program so her hoarding tendencies get excused w/ her getting lesson horses, etc.
    and yes, there is definitely a shortage of $ issue. although i think that people like that will spend every $ they have on just acquiring more horses until they're broke.
    http://www.eponashoe.com/
    TQ(Trail Queen) \"Learn How to Ride or Move Over!!\" Clique



  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by marta View Post
    that would be the one.
    Are you certain that the arrangement would be an adoption? From the email I received, I did not get the impression that was the case but moreso a plea to generate private interest (private purchase). Obviously however, if the situation is as you portray (with the person), the original sender of the email should be notified privately of the less than adequate conditions based on your knowledge. JMHO



  14. #14
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    Default marli

    i'm not sure. i'm getting this info second hand.
    i was curious as to what people's thoughts were on the issue.
    http://www.eponashoe.com/
    TQ(Trail Queen) \"Learn How to Ride or Move Over!!\" Clique



  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by marta View Post
    i'm not sure. i'm getting this info second hand.
    i was curious as to what people's thoughts were on the issue.
    ICK! Second hand info is not always good or reliable (imo). My advice to you would be to contact the person that originated the email about the horses (or call her/whatever you feel more comfortable with) as a precaution. Just explain the second hand info you have so that at least it's been conveyed. A good rule of thumb- contact a person directly if there is any doubt or question as there are no crystal balls and plenty of idle gossip that gets passed around (and around and around). Sometimes it makes knowing what is reality versus fiction near impossible! JMHO



  16. #16
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    I despise horse slaughter. That said I do not think that slaughter is the very worst thing that can happen to a horse. I believe that years and years of simply surviving in bad or worse conditions is a special kind of hell for so many undeserving horses. Is there anything you or anyone you know that could do to provide an alternative safe temporary place for the horse?
    Pam



  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by ptownevt View Post
    I despise horse slaughter. That said I do not think that slaughter is the very worst thing that can happen to a horse. I believe that years and years of simply surviving in bad or worse conditions is a special kind of hell for so many undeserving horses. Is there anything you or anyone you know that could do to provide an alternative safe temporary place for the horse?
    Pam
    no.
    and that's the problem

    my gf rescued a mare earlier this spring. i help her out as much as i can. she looks amazing now. but we're both in boarding situations w/ no $ so no way we can help out hope someone else steps up.
    http://www.eponashoe.com/
    TQ(Trail Queen) \"Learn How to Ride or Move Over!!\" Clique



  18. #18
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    Marta,

    I just realized that there is another rescue that pulls horses from Camelot. Hmmm.... the rescue- do you know what state it's based out of?



  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by marta View Post
    is a death sentence at that point better than the alternative? or does the possibility that this person will give the horse a few extra years of life outweigh the fact that it'll receive spotty care at best?
    I'm torn. An animal in a decent condition that has a good chance of being relatively happy for the forseeable future even with spotty care might be pretty happy to simply be alive at this woman's barn. A sick or compromised animal will suffer quickly if she treats it with the same slapdash care.

    In both cases, I think handing her a horse will cause harm to the whole cause of 'rescue' as this woman will, if she's at all typical of people with hoarder instincts, be very outspoken about having 'rescued' this animal. She will be a visible representative of the idea that a discarded, unwanted and financially worthless animal has a call on our time and effort and love, just as much as a champion or flawlessly bred creature. I think this revolutionary idea, which is pretty new in the bloodlines-obsessed world of domestic animals, is already overburdened with people who place a higher premium on feeling good than doing good.

    Balanced against the individual best interests of one doomed animal? Hard call.



  20. #20
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    Default vacation1

    you are so right. this woman has gotten rescued horses before and showcased that as an example of her great heart all over the universe.
    http://www.eponashoe.com/
    TQ(Trail Queen) \"Learn How to Ride or Move Over!!\" Clique



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