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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr. 28, 2009
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    Default If you used centaur or ramm...

    What size diameter line and corner posts did you use? Did you drive them or auger? Did you concrete all of them? Anything you wish you'd done differently? Getting ready to order before long and still don't know what to do!



  2. #2
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    Jan. 15, 2004
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    Lancaster, PA, USA
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    Quote Originally Posted by dmalbone View Post
    What size diameter line and corner posts did you use? Did you drive them or auger? Did you concrete all of them? Anything you wish you'd done differently? Getting ready to order before long and still don't know what to do!
    Don't remember the size..........regular fenceposts/same as the rest
    auger as that is what we have
    you are supposed to ideally concrete them but we did not though we do cross brace the corners.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct. 25, 2005
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    1,742

    Default depends on your ground

    the line posts can be 4-5 inches, just regular sized for any fence, our corner posts are big and we used concrete and braces and they still pulled over............but we are on an old riverbed and have beautiful white sand that goes forever. Definately not a plus when putting in a tension fence!



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov. 15, 2008
    Location
    CT
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    91

    Default

    4 inch round for the lines and 6 inch round for the corners. corners set in concrete. we're putting in another paddock this weekend...



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep. 13, 2002
    Location
    Pacific Northwest
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    Default

    We did Centaur. Had a guy install for us and in retrospect, wish I had been a little more involved. For posts, we did 4-5 inch round for the line posts and 6 inch for the corners, which are braced as the manual directs. All concreted. Two years later, all posts are doing well and I'm mostly pleased with the fencing. Except the one thing that I didn't pay attention to -- spacing of the rails. We just told our guy to follow the specs in the manual and didn't realize it only shows spacing for a 4-rail installation, while we were doing 3-rails. So the guy put the bottom and top rails as you would for a 4-rail fence, then ran the other one down the middle. Makes the bottom really low and the spacing between too big -- drives me crazy every time I look at it, but it is my own fault for not checking it out when they started.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr. 28, 2009
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    2,108

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by horsepoor View Post
    We did Centaur. Had a guy install for us and in retrospect, wish I had been a little more involved. For posts, we did 4-5 inch round for the line posts and 6 inch for the corners, which are braced as the manual directs. All concreted. Two years later, all posts are doing well and I'm mostly pleased with the fencing. Except the one thing that I didn't pay attention to -- spacing of the rails. We just told our guy to follow the specs in the manual and didn't realize it only shows spacing for a 4-rail installation, while we were doing 3-rails. So the guy put the bottom and top rails as you would for a 4-rail fence, then ran the other one down the middle. Makes the bottom really low and the spacing between too big -- drives me crazy every time I look at it, but it is my own fault for not checking it out when they started.
    Hey, you could always run a couple strands of white lightning or polyplus between. It's super cheap.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug. 6, 2007
    Posts
    465

    Default

    We used 5 inch line, 6 inch corner posts. Round your corners. Our first paddock I trusted the installer ( and went off to work) and the corners were done like traditional high tensile. While they have held up well ( 15 years now!) I hate them. The rest of our pastures are all rounded. We had all of our posts driven. We did not use concrete.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2003
    Location
    NorthEast
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    I have the Ramm...4" line posts and 6" corner/end/gate posts. All rounds, bought from Ramm and shipped here because we had such a big order the order was coming on a flat bed anyways and they didn't charge any more shipping for tossing a couple hundred posts on there too. (well, the flat bed had our order and one other barn in my area's large order so we both got a better deal on shipping)
    Have to say their customer service was *beyond* excellent. Seriously...they stayed on the phone with us all day on a Saturday to talk us through proper installation. And they have very detailed instructions too. It's our own fault we put it up backwards, LOL! That was *my* not-so-bright idea to attach the fence to the outside of the posts rather than the inside. I was thinking...well, not sure what the hell I was thinking but whatever it was...it was stupid. I have to swap it all around now to the inside...so whatever you do, do NOT install it attached to the outside of the posts.
    We also sucked at putting in the posts. We rented an auger, used a laser level and spray paint on the ground to mark out perfectly straight and evenly spaced lines and went to work. We finished and it looks like Ray Charles put up our posts after half a bottle of Cuervo.
    Did I mention we're DIY morons?
    Anywho...the fencing is relatively easy to put up...as long as you're smarter than a sea sponge and more handy than a rock.
    I have the 4.25" 3 wire Flex Fence for the top rail...that was easy to installl right. Only tough part is that when you unwind it from the huge roll, it doesn't want to be straight at first. I got rolled up in it a few times. But it's attractive and easy to re-tension, but that does take two people since you need one to hold the tensioner and the other to slip the pins in and out to tighten it. Not strength, just 4 hands are needed.
    The rest of the fence is 4 strands of 5/16 coated wire...REALLY easy to install. Just line up on post and hammer in staples. To the INSIDE of the fence post. Seriously, inside.
    My fence also has/had a space left in the wires for one strand of braided rope electric that I never got around to installing. Would have been a good idea to install it to keep the horses from leaning on the fence and popping the staples out now and then because I put the staples on the OUTSIDE of the fence like an idiot. But I figured if I screwed up regular fence badly enough I wasn't going to try electric fence and accidentally blow up my barn or something. (not that electric is hard to do but well, we can screw up anything when it comes to fencing. We're decent at everything else BUT fencing)
    My fencing is top rail of the Flex Fence, 4 strands coated wire and will have one strand electric rope. We cemented the corner posts and end and gate posts but didn't brace them. Another dingbat decision...brace all of your gate posts, end posts and corner posts as well as cementing them. Buy Quik-crete Fence for those posts. No need to pre-mix, just dump bag in hole around fence post and pour the water in and wait for it to set. Easy.
    We're having fence pros come out soon to fence my second paddock (told hubby I refuse to ever try fencing again) and to re-do the mistakes I made on the first paddock fence.
    There's a barn here in my town that has the same fence I do from Ramm and they put it up in a really nice way. Instead of using staples for the coated wire and instead of using the plastic attachers for the electric they drilled holes through the center of the round posts and ran the rope and coated wiire right through the holes. Looks very neat and lovely, I may ask the fence guys if that's a good idea for here.
    This is what my fence combo is (well, what it should look like, LOL):
    http://www.rammfence.com/shop/images...dwire_01_m.jpg
    You jump in the saddle,
    Hold onto the bridle!
    Jump in the line!
    ...Belefonte



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar. 14, 2007
    Posts
    2,313

    Default

    Misty Blue...if you haven't (!) already taken your 'inside the post' flex fencing down, they do indeed sell an 'inside corner bracket' that will allow you to run your flex fence on the inside of your posts, not the outside. Since it is the corners that take the tension, you need these to do this. They're more heavy duty and need bolts to attach them, but it does allow you to hang your flex fence on the inside ...the line posts would still use the same brackets you've already hung.
    The reason I know this is because on my job, I wanted to know if the posts could all be on the outside, as I was using a specific grass area to double as my dressage arena, and wanted all posts on the outside in order to be able to ride deep in the corners and have it correct in meters/footage.
    Now, because of this set up, and the fact that I have also put two lines of hotcote, he DID run the hot coat on the 'outside' of the posts, only on the corners. ---after the corners, he brought it back inside the fence line (seems Ramm does not have the set up for all of this to be on the inside, as they do with the special brackets for the flex)
    Please (!!!) visit my thread in this same forum dealing with the hot cote question---I'm so happy with my fence, but so unhappy with the way the electric hot cote portion is done on the posts, with the ground wire, etc....but it seems that was my ignorance (?) in just not knowing what to expect in how its installed.
    ayrabz
    "Indecision may or may not be my problem"
    --Jimmy Buffett



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2003
    Location
    NorthEast
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    Default

    Thanks Ayrabz...I'll check out your other post.
    They did have the inside brackets for the flex fence when I bought mine too.
    The dingbat part...where I was showing off my lack of reasoning....is that my line fencing is all attached to the outside including corners.
    Yeah...I make a lot of sense, don't I? At least I got the corners right.
    That's why I was interested in possibly doing the attachment via the drilled holes in the posts. Neither inside nor outside. The Flex fence would still be by bracket since it's so wide. That hasn't been an issue attached outside the paddock posts...those brackets hold up like crazy no problems. It's been an issue with the coated wire...and then only an issue since last November. The first 5 years...worked perfectly even though backwards. Even no issues when my very large, very heavy mare ran into it full steam ahead trying to break through it (she was a real fence tester) and even 1600 lbs doing a good 25+ mph hitting the flex and wires didn't make any loose at all. And she boinged right back unharmed. The fencing didn't even loosen, no lost staples and no loose brackets.
    But my newest gelding is a fence hanger...he leans on it and then leans ALL his weight forward trying to reach the farthest possible outside the fence. The constant pressure of him leaning on it is causing the staples holding the coated wire to come out. The heavy mare hitting it, no problem. Constant leaning by a 900 lb QH...problem. Last November when I got the newer horse is when I realized why the fence is supposed to be attached on the inside, LOL!
    You jump in the saddle,
    Hold onto the bridle!
    Jump in the line!
    ...Belefonte



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan. 15, 2004
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    Lancaster, PA, USA
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MistyBlue View Post
    Last November when I got the newer horse is when I realized why the fence is supposed to be attached on the inside, LOL!
    Ditto........
    part of ours was installed by hubby/part by a fence installer. Both ran it on the outside. Found out the same thing...........though for the parts that run between paddocks it makes no difference......for someone one side is inside and the other it is outside for shared fencelines.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2003
    Location
    NorthEast
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    Oh good, so a fence installer also did it on the outside. I don't feel so bad now.
    I guess for cross fencing the side wouldn't matter, but it certainly does for perimatere fencing, LOL!
    Sonny the newer guy has been leaning on it when I was near the barn and I could hear the "ping!" of a staple flying out. Grab a hammer and new staple and out to bang in a new one.

    Can't wait to get it redone.
    You jump in the saddle,
    Hold onto the bridle!
    Jump in the line!
    ...Belefonte



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Sep. 13, 2002
    Location
    Pacific Northwest
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by dmalbone View Post
    Hey, you could always run a couple strands of white lightning or polyplus between. It's super cheap.
    Actually, that's my plan to make it look more like we meant to do it this way...and beats trying to pull the brackets off and move things (which for some reason my SO thinks is a bad idea...).



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Nov. 4, 2003
    Location
    Sanger, TX, USA
    Posts
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    Have seen installations with the holes drilled through the posts. Asked the dealer in Colorado in our area about that and he didn't recommend it as it breaches the perservatives
    of the wood post. Also said it made repairs harder. For the electric, the holes have to be bigger and pieces of insulatube cut a little bigger than the post situated in each hole to insulate the electric from the wood post.

    Have seen a few installs done with PVC posts with the holes--looked good.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Oct. 2, 1999
    Location
    Mendocino County, CA: Turkey Vulture HQ
    Posts
    14,697

    Default

    I have a top rail of RAMM on no climb fence. I followed the RAMM directions for bracing. The corner posts are 10' x 6" round dowels and the line posts are 8' 4x4" pressure treated.

    We tried renting an auger. That sucked. For about the same price I called a fencing guy and he came and drilled all our holes in about an hour. The corners are 4'6" deep and in lots of concrete. The line posts are just filled with dirt.

    I haven not had to tighten the RAMM even once. I wish we'd pulled harder on the no-climb, though.

    Oh, I didn't use the nails they supplied, but instead we used stainless steel deck screws. I love those screws.
    If you are allergic to a thing, it is best not to put that thing in your mouth, particularly if the thing is cats. - Lemony Snicket



  16. #16
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    Feb. 6, 2003
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    NorthEast
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    Oh good point BasqueMom, hadn't thought of drilling holes ruining the pressure treating.
    Nope, won't do that. Would rather have the regular installation and not rotted posts.

    Poltroon...LOVE deck screws. Use them for tons of stuff that calls for nails. Much nicer to not have to walk around twice a week pounding in loose nails. Deck screws never loosen that I've seen.

    One thing I didn't mention...if going wiith the Flex type fence or coated wire get a serious pir of bolt cutters or something similar and someone with huge arms. Maybe it's just me and my little hands and spaghetti noodle arms, but cutting that coated wire was next to impossible for me.
    Stripping the last few inches of it to wrap on the tensioners was even harder. Directions say squeeze to crimp and loosen coating from wire, cut around and slide off. Reality wasn't even close. Ended up finding a way that took about 15 minutes per wire...smashing between rock and sledge hammer repeatedly, cutting with razor knife and then using blow torch, hubby grips wire and I grip supposedly "loose" end with pliers and we both run in different directions...half the time I get dragged backwards instead.
    I would assume there's an easier way, but that was what worked for us.
    But do remember I've mentioned before that hubby and I are idiots.
    You jump in the saddle,
    Hold onto the bridle!
    Jump in the line!
    ...Belefonte



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Nov. 15, 2008
    Location
    CT
    Posts
    91

    Default

    This is so funny to read, we spent all weekend putting up another fence and thank goodness Mr. Java's Mom is an excellent installer. BUT stripping the coating off the wire is our breaking point. He finally took some down to the workshop and put it in the vice and pulled. When working with the fencing after installed, I'm standing there pulling pocket knives our of every pocket saying "try this one, and be carefull" Then two seconds later, "try this one... please don't cut yourself!" And we have some pretty funny names for the Spinning Jenny. i can hold the thing straight if I'm not laughing too hard.



  18. #18
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    Feb. 6, 2003
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    NorthEast
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    So it wasn't just us who couldn;t strip that @&%#ing wire! Thank goodness, I was worried that we were completely incompetent and not just idiots.
    We ended up dragging the tool-box w/tires outside the barn and trying just about every tool in there to cut and strip the wires. BTW, the Sawzall was a really dumb thing to try. We don't have a vice...better put that on my list of I Wants. (with the nail gun, trailer sprayer and pressure washer)
    We didn't have a spinning Jenny...more of a Rotating Rebecca.
    Yup...*I* was the spinning jenny. I kinda sucked at it too...and got dizzy and annoyed. Fell down a lot too.
    You jump in the saddle,
    Hold onto the bridle!
    Jump in the line!
    ...Belefonte



  19. #19
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    Apr. 17, 2002
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    between the barn and the pond
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    14,495

    Default

    LOL you just needed a good pr of wire strippers, guys!Strip off about 3", pull it off, then another 3-5", til you're done. Can't do it all at once, too hard that way.

    we did our own fencing and it's not perfect, but it's 'ok'. Weaknesses? The corner posts should have been deeper and stouter. They should be braced better. Mr Kat didn't think they would budge. Post budge, he's wrong LOL. One day we'll loosen the tensioners and fix it. Maybe. I do reinforce the four strand black coated wire (on the inside ) with an offset hot wire at chest height to the horses.



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2003
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    NorthEast
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    Oh if only wire strippers worked Katarine. They don't even come close to denting the coating, forget stripping it off the wire.
    I have wire strippers...they work great on soft plastic and rubber coating on electric wires. But for cemented on, thick, hard-as-nails plastic wrapped/melted/permaglued onto 5/16 wire...the wire laughs at the strippers.
    You jump in the saddle,
    Hold onto the bridle!
    Jump in the line!
    ...Belefonte



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