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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan. 17, 2008
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    Dutchess County, New York
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    Default Stall mats in run-in?

    We are turning one bay of an old barn into a run-in. The floor is concrete, so I am planning on putting stall mats down. I don't want to leave it bare, because I imagine standing on the concrete for any length of time would not be great for the horses. I don't want to put shavings down as it is a very large space and I don't want to be mucking a lot of shavings out every day.

    Will the mats hold up? Are they the best option?

    I don't want to get rid of the concrete either -- I'm planning on setting it up so the run-in can be divided into two large stalls for use in blizzards. I guess that's another question -- would a pipe gate do the trick? (The two horses stabled that way would be good buddies). Thanks for any advice you could offer!



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct. 12, 2005
    Location
    Va
    Posts
    4,661

    Default

    I have stall mats in my run-ins -over 10 years now and they're still holding up well. One run-in is "sectioned" with just a couple boards nailed up between the "stalls" and yes, I have pipe gates.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct. 2, 2007
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    Beyond the pale.
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    Default

    I put my worn out old stall matts in my run ins. The ones that, after 13 years, have been pawed through in one spot by a habitual pawer. They do a good job in the run in as they sit on top of the gravel and keep the horses' feet dry. My matts are 3/4 inch thick and most of them are still good after 13 years- I have seen them still in use at 20 years old at boarding stables.

    If you are putting them on concrete and will house horses there for long periods ( like stalls in a blizzard), get the thick heavier matts- it does make a difference standing on concrete- 1/4 or 1/2 inch matts are not enough- get the 3/4 or 1 inch kind. And the pipe gate should be good enough- I ahve subdivided my large paddocks with sections of pipe fence from my old round pen and they work well. Make sure it is properly secured so the horses cannot shift the divider.
    "The Threat of Internet Ignorance: ... we are witnessing the rise of an age of equestrian disinformation, one where a trusting public can graze on nonsense packaged to look like fact."-LRG-AF



  4. #4
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    Jan. 17, 2008
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    Dutchess County, New York
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    Default

    Thanks, you guys!



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun. 14, 2006
    Location
    VA
    Posts
    11,372

    Default

    You might end up needing to put some shavings in to keep it from getting too slick--even with the mats.
    A good horseman doesn't have to tell anyone...the horse already knows.

    Might be a reason, never an excuse...



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    44,817

    Default

    I have rubber mats, the thick ones, under the shed, about half of it, because I feed there and the ground is dirt and sand.
    They have held up well, altough the horses go to the sandier spots to lay down to rest, not on the mats.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec. 1, 2007
    Location
    Gettysburg, PA
    Posts
    2,652

    Default

    Ours have been in several years and are holding up beautifully. They'll go in and lay down if its muddy, otherwise they prefer out to lay down. I love the ease of cleaning.
    Epona Farm
    Irish Draughts and Irish Sport horses

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  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct. 31, 2001
    Location
    West of insanity, east of apathy, deep in the heart of Texas.
    Posts
    15,828

    Default

    Agree that mats over the concrete are your best bet. The only thing I would consider, in your situation, is to make a sort of frame for each stall's mats, so they won't shift. Either with wood, or with bricking/pavers, but measure so that a brick/paver/wood frame will contain six mats (standard to cover a 12 x 12 space), and then sink them into the frame. My husband did this for the two stalls he added to our last barn; dug down about 6 inches, filled in with about 4" of tamped down crushed limestone, watered and pounded to a concrete consistency, then put the mats down over the limestone. Mats never moved, drained beautifully, and came up easily when we sold the farm and moved. I highly recommend it.
    In loving memory of Laura Jahnke.
    A life lived by example, done too soon.
    www.caringbridge.org/page/laurajahnke/



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct. 2, 2007
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    Beyond the pale.
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    Default

    Our matts are also laid over several feet of compacted sand and the horses prefer to lay down on them rather than outside. They are like giant bean bag chairs for the horses when done that way, the mats stay put and drain nicely even after years and years.

    Yes, and hence how my buddy found out that if it ain't nailed or glued down, it might not be there after you buy the house. He bought a 20 stall barn and indoor. When he took possession, all the stall matts had been removed. And most of the turnout paddocks were pipe corral sections and they were all gone too. About $20,000 he wasn't counting on spending to replace that. He was most surprised to see the fabric building, machine shed was gone, but he got that back as it was in the original listing.
    "The Threat of Internet Ignorance: ... we are witnessing the rise of an age of equestrian disinformation, one where a trusting public can graze on nonsense packaged to look like fact."-LRG-AF



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct. 1, 2002
    Location
    Cow County, MD
    Posts
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    Default

    Another one with mats in the run-in for several years. I echo the previous poster who recommended some sort of fram to keep them from shifting. Our shed is one of the kinds that comes from the Amish on skids, so it had something of a threshold to begin with. We filled it in almost to the top with leveled and tamped bluestone, and the mats haven't moved in seven years.

    They occasionally get slick if a horse pees in there. Rain doesn't seem to be as much of a problem, unless it's typhoon-style.
    Life would be infinitely better if pinatas suddenly appeared throughout the day.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan. 17, 2008
    Location
    Dutchess County, New York
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    4,362

    Default

    Thanks for all the advice. The barn was originally built in 1790, so no measurements are standard (from memory, it is 27 feet 7 inches long for example). I have the world's greatest handyman, and he's going to cut the stall mats to fit, so they (hopefully) will fit perfectly and that will prevent them from shifting. He has a special saw he uses (couldn't tell you the name).

    Glad to hear about the wet . . . only one horse likes to pee inside, so with any luck that won't be an issue, but I will monitor. Also good advice to get the thickest mats, I'll make sure they are 1" thick.

    Thanks so much for all the replies.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Apr. 28, 2009
    Posts
    2,108

    Default

    Keep an eye out in the winter. I'm in Indiana and snowy hooves on rubber mats are like ice skates. Better than concrete obviously, but I'd put something over the rubber in the winter personally.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Oct. 23, 2000
    Location
    Cincinnati, OH USA
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    1,021

    Default

    you might consider putting some coarse sand over the mats. But if you do then feed hay etc from racks not from the ground.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Oct. 2, 2007
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    Beyond the pale.
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    Default

    some of the mats are available with a textured side and a smooth side. For snowy/wet conditions, put the textured side up.
    "The Threat of Internet Ignorance: ... we are witnessing the rise of an age of equestrian disinformation, one where a trusting public can graze on nonsense packaged to look like fact."-LRG-AF



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