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  1. #1
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    Default Spinoff- Under what conditions do YOU donate to Equine rescue efforts?

    So, after all of the discussion about donating to rescues- of one stripe, or another- what would it take to cause you to part with some $$ to help a horse, or horses, in need?
    When someone shows you who they are, BELIEVE them- Maya Angelou
    www.americansaddlebredsporthorse.net
    http://www.asbsporthorse.blogspot.com/



  2. #2
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    Jan. 4, 2007
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    That is a good question, as we are not made of money, so we have to make it count for what we need out of our lives.

    I have a budget and have learned that you can't help all and every time, so you just do what you can within it and when you are at the limit you set, you just have to let others support the rescues in need.

    Even with a carefully assigned budget, you have to be flexible, as the unexpected tends to be more common than any plans we may want to depend on.

    I definitely try not to support those that are not only working for the direct rescue of horses, but use their rescue for political purposes, taking stances in other our horse industry is debating, like being completely against slaughter, or supporting animal rights groups.

    Fine if individuals do so, but when they represent their rescue, that is questionable in my eyes, if they are for or against what I think we should do, BOTH.
    A rescue is not a pulpit for one's own agendas, other than directly helping the horses in need of rescue.

    That is what rescue used to be and I understand people are changing that meaning today, but I don't have to go along with it and don't want to be supporting them with my money.

    Coming from the dog world, rescue is more specific there, you don't go telling others how to run their rescues, but you have set ideas of what is sensible or not.
    An example, no kill shelters, that end up warehousing unadoptable dogs, are in my eyes not fair to the dogs there for years and the ones that missed because there is not enough resources for all.
    But, I don't go telling no kill shelters how to handle their efforts to help dogs.
    Each one does what they can the way they see best.



  3. #3
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    Oct. 18, 2000
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    Default

    Mission

    Organization

    Financials

    Reputation

    Donor relations



  4. #4
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    I am looking for specifics here- not general topics. What does their mission need to be? How do you KNOW? Etc. Concrete standards under which you get on board. Reputation, as an exampe, is an interesting one, because there is always someone with another opinion...
    When someone shows you who they are, BELIEVE them- Maya Angelou
    www.americansaddlebredsporthorse.net
    http://www.asbsporthorse.blogspot.com/



  5. #5
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    Uh -I'm not overly enthused about giving a lecture on Development/fundraising - especially with the hostility displayed by some rescues and their associates on this BB.

    But very generally - for any nonprofit

    Mission.

    Is the mission of the organization something I support or am interested in? (save the whales versus save the 3 toe yellow bellied salamander)

    Organization.

    How the nonprofit organized? Who is on their Board and what are their bios? Who are the leaders within the organization and what are their bios? Do they have clear policies and procedures? Is there transparency?

    Financials.

    How does the organization handle money? Do they file returns on time and do they make them available to the public as required? Are their financials easily available to the public (including the balance sheet).

    Reputation.

    I disagree with you here - the nonprofit is in charge of its reputation. No one gives it the reputation it has - the nonprofit earns it. For better or worse.

    Is the nonprofit reputed to be run by reasonable, informed people? Do their volunteers or employees (if any) have a standard of conduct they're expected to conform to?

    Donor Relations

    This is sort of an umbrella - this is often the determining factor for a potential donor. They'll forgive many things in a nonprofit - except being treated poorly.

    This area touches on all the rest. A nonprofit with staff or volunteers that are hostile, political or partisan, act unprofessionally in public (including bb's) is turning away donors they don't even know are out there.

    A nonprofit should avoid even the appearance of impropriety. This is especially true of small nonprofits, who rely on a very small pool of donors.

    Volunteers or staff that goad members of the public, accuse the public of "not loving horses's enough" or engage in acts which place potential donors on the defensive are not only losing a potential donor; they're damaging their reputation and efficacy.

    A nonprofit can learn a great deal about its effectiveness by looking over its records and seeing how many repeat donors there are - and if those repeat donors give greater amounts over time.

    If you're not seeing repeat donors giving more and more over time - and that pool of donors is not growing at a steady rate.... something is very wrong and it's not with the donors.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    May. 9, 2008
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    Default

    ^^^^
    What Jswan said

    If I have to work at donating to a group...I just do not donate. Make it easy and people will give.

    And drama...if there is drama, I walk away. There is ALWAYS drama, but I am talking the type of drama that just transpired with the now long gone "rescuer" dragging a non-profit into the mire. No thanks.
    I Loff My Quarter Horse & I love Fenway Bartholomule cliques

    Just somebody with a positive outlook on life...go ahead...hate me for that.



  7. #7
    Piqua Guest

    Default

    I prefer to go through local organizations that I have a connection with; I can directly see how well their actions mirror their mission statement and how they deal with tough decisions. The money that I donate also stays here...it goes to the feed stores, or the local vets, farriers, and trainers. Although I will personally try to adopt an OTTB when the time comes to get another horse, I'm more compelled to save the horses in my own back yard with my donation dollars.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    May. 16, 2007
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    In very general terms, I am most impressed with the rescues that give the horses training to make them marketable. It takes a lot of energy and staff to not only feed a horse up and tend to his medical needs, but to go further and train the horse. A rescue like this can help a lot of horses.

    Other rescues operate more like retirement homes and have a lot of companion animal type horses.Although these damaged and old timer horses can pull on your heart strings, they are harder to adopt out.

    I understand how you can get caught up with one horse that needs $1,000s of dollars to rehab but would rather see that money spent to give several horses a chance.

    So i would be more inclined to help out a rescue that operates more like a business and keeps the horses moving.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr. 23, 2004
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    Los Angeles
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    Personally I feel much better if a rescue has actually rescued something that needed to be rescued--ie done the heavy lifting of actually taking possession of a horse that was starving in a field, done rehab and retraining and then worked with the possible future owners to match them to this horse's needs . That to me is rescue. Of course that is expensive and long and some people just like the drama of the save. Paying board bills is pretty pedestrian stuff.

    I'm NOT saying this was the situation recently but my warning bells go off when the rescue doesn't own the horse, uses emotionally manipulative and urgent words like slaughter and bail and ransom, wants a multitude of people on the Internet to chip in small amounts for that specific horse the rescue does not own and those people will never see, when the price of the horse appears to be above meat price not to mention the going rate for that kind of horse and the rescue has a longstanding and maybe even exclusive arrangement with a broker/ dealer who actually owns these animals.

    To me anyway, that relationship is just begging for exploitation to occur--maybe of the rescue and maybe of the donors and maybe both. It's just a small step between helping a horse at a brokers to "I gotta move 10 horses a month at $X and I'll make it worth your while to do that."

    Again I have no knowledge about the recent "save" and I'm not implying anything specific but that scenario is not farfetched and its the reason why the whole broker thing gives some of us pause.



  10. #10
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    Nov. 23, 1999
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    The rescue itself should be the only one discussing its own business practice / model / process. Really. If people have questions, resist the urge to leap all over the person asking them, alert the person running the rescue and let them address it.
    EDDIE WOULD GO



  11. #11
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    May. 9, 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by Coreene View Post
    The rescue itself should be the only one discussing its own business practice / model / process. Really. If people have questions, resist the urge to leap all over the person asking them, alert the person running the rescue and let them address it.
    Thankfully AC4H was alerted to this most recent drama and they did answer the questions asked. It was pretty simple really...the OP/Fundraiser/"rescuer" needed to go through the proper channels and be approved as an adoptive home. Just like any other potential adopter.

    The OP REALLY owes AC4H an apology for the nonsense they caused, but I see they have disappeared now that the "free" horse is no longer available.
    I Loff My Quarter Horse & I love Fenway Bartholomule cliques

    Just somebody with a positive outlook on life...go ahead...hate me for that.



  12. #12
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    Amen, sister. And all her buddies, too.
    EDDIE WOULD GO



  13. #13

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ASB Stars View Post
    So, after all of the discussion about donating to rescues- of one stripe, or another- what would it take to cause you to part with some $$ to help a horse, or horses, in need?
    well


    it would be a really really really hard thing to do....
    Production Acres,Pro A Welsh Cobs
    I am one of the last 210,000 remaining full time farmers in America.We feed the others.



  14. #14
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    Nov. 15, 2005
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    NY
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    Everything Jswan wrote, but will add

    -I only work with and donate [mostly my time these days] to local rescues I know [having seen with my own eyes] the good works they do. That came about after insisting I knew the good CBER was doing... OY did I learn!

    -I prefer rescues who have other sources of funds besides online bb donation drives- and in fact those who get the majority of their funds that way.

    -PR work: the rescue I vol. with does booths at so many public events all summer- it's exhausting, but it gets their name out there, gets word out that the need exists and helps find new adopters/fosters/donors.

    -honestly I avoid rescues who pay for their horses.... the rescue I vol. with rarely has to buy the horse to 'save' it and at times gets the person giving up the animal to cover some care [let me tell you she could teach diplomacy 101!]. Besides keeping costs to the rescue down, in a way I see it as showing the owner their responsibility to the animal and perhaps reinforcing that they are not in a place to get another.

    - I also am against those who go to dramatic lengths to save a horse who's prognosis is poor. Euthanasia is not the worst thing that can happen to an animal.



  15. #15
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    Jan. 31, 2003
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    I look at each situation individually, even within the same rescue organization. Often I can be more helpful by offering services rather than a small amount of money. As I value my time equally, if not more, than money, I take that just as seriously.

    I am disinclined to donate to a rescue whose policy is to keep unsound horses alive and eating up funds. I am also disinclined to donate to any rescue who fundraises to have surgery on an animal that has an unlikely prognosis of being anything other than pasture sound. I am more inclinded to donate to a rescue who is comfortable with euthanasia in those cases and is not afraid to say so.

    I am more inclined to donate to rescues who try to place animals as quickly as possible with the least amount of placement criteria. Rescues who have no-resell contracts for all horses do not get my money. I understand that some horses may need to be adopted out as such but I don't think all should be.

    I am directly contacted by reputable rescues on a fairly regular basis and asked to help with individual situations. One of my criteria for doing so, is that if I am going to foster a horse that it is not an open ended foster - meaning, there has to be a definate time frame in which the horse will be coming and then leaving. Willy-nilly buying/rescuing with no idea what to do w/the horse next leaves a bad taste in my mouth and I won't participate in that.
    "Kindness is free" ~ Eurofoal
    ---
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances.



  16. #16
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    What J Swan said and adding in that I don't donate to rescues that don't handle money in a way *I* find wasteful.
    As in I will not donate to a rescue that saves a 25 yo horse that requires expensive surgery or a younger horse that requires expensive surgery and it will probably never be sound afterwards. In my personal opinion I think this is wasteful although I do understand 100% that it does tug at the heart strings. However I think a GOOD rescue is someone who wants to do rescue because of the size of their heart but *runs* the rescue with their heads and not their hearts. But I will discontinue donating to a rescue that spends the income on an expensive procedure for one horse when they could have used that same amount to save, rehab and rehome multiple other horses.
    I know a lot of people are "we can save them one at a time" but I prefer to use the same amount of money more wisely and save them "5 at a time." Since there isn't any shortage of horses in need in this country I prefer quantity over heart strings.
    I also don't tend to donate to rescues that retire horses for long periods, taking up valuable room and resources for many others over the years. Foster them out as companions or euthanize them after they've enjoyed the good life for a while.
    And I never donate to rescues where the rescuers ever are "OMG I'm crying" or ranting or otherwise emotional cases. As stated before...rescue is a business. get into it from your heart, run it with your head.


    FWIW...I have an AC4H horse here. Got him last October or November (darned crappy memory of mine). I knew he was from the broker, understood the connection fully. Still had no issues buying him because:
    a) I wanted to own my horse, not adopt him
    b) I wanted something particular and the broker had what I wanted
    c) could have gotten same thing, same price or possibly cheaper from other brokers out of state but knew some of the proceeds from purchasing through AC4H's broker went to help AC4H with the poor souls they do save from NH auction.

    I've noticed the horses with issues or needing a lot of time and rehab are the AC4H horses, they give them the space, time and care they might need before adopting them out. The ready to ride and only somewhat rough (or not( horses through their site are the broker horses...which either go to private buyers with AC4H helping and getting a tiny portion for their rescue or they do go through the auction, some do ship to slaughter or go to other auctions. AC4H seems to go for the more desperate cases and the broker horses have the best chance of private home sales at the auction where the sad cases the rescue bids on wouldn't have much of a chance. Sometimes AC4H seems to accept donations to stop a broker horse going through auction so it can be housed for a while longer until a buyer is found and that's fine with me too. It's a numbers game to me...and the broker and AC4H is in it for the numbers. Seems to save more over time so I'm definitely keeping them on my list as future horse purchases come up. And those will be through the broker and not adopted.
    For *me* it's a win/win. AC4H gets a portion of the sales price as a donation. The broker gets a sale and I don't begrudge someone their income or profit since it;s my choice to purchase or not. I get the horse I wanted for a price I couldn't touch here in CT...and AC4H does do a very credible job evaluating the broker and auction horses considering the volume they do. My horse came exactly as advertised. And as bad as the horse market is right now, there still isn't anywhere in my state to get a 5 yo dead broke safe sane and sound registered QH gelding for $650.
    You jump in the saddle,
    Hold onto the bridle!
    Jump in the line!
    ...Belefonte



  17. #17
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    Nov. 15, 2005
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    Quote Originally Posted by MistyBlue View Post
    For *me* it's a win/win. AC4H gets a portion of the sales price as a donation.
    As I understand it they get $25/horse? Every dribble helps I guess.



  18. #18
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    Jan. 23, 2004
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    Quote Originally Posted by EqTrainer View Post
    I look at each situation individually, even within the same rescue organization. Often I can be more helpful by offering services rather than a small amount of money. As I value my time equally, if not more, than money, I take that just as seriously.

    I am disinclined to donate to a rescue whose policy is to keep unsound horses alive and eating up funds. I am also disinclined to donate to any rescue who fundraises to have surgery on an animal that has an unlikely prognosis of being anything other than pasture sound. I am more inclinded to donate to a rescue who is comfortable with euthanasia in those cases and is not afraid to say so.

    I am more inclined to donate to rescues who try to place animals as quickly as possible with the least amount of placement criteria. Rescues who have no-resell contracts for all horses do not get my money. I understand that some horses may need to be adopted out as such but I don't think all should be.

    I am directly contacted by reputable rescues on a fairly regular basis and asked to help with individual situations. One of my criteria for doing so, is that if I am going to foster a horse that it is not an open ended foster - meaning, there has to be a definate time frame in which the horse will be coming and then leaving. Willy-nilly buying/rescuing with no idea what to do w/the horse next leaves a bad taste in my mouth and I won't participate in that.
    I couldn't have said it any better and the reasons above are what made me get involved with CANTER Mid Atlantic. I have no money to donate but have a lot of skills in retraining ottb's and how to transition them from track to riding homes. CANTER is able to move horses fairly quickly with a bit of retraining into them which allows us to put a bit of that money back into the program to keep the cycle going. They are sold for market value and do have a contract but not a no-resale clause. I am involved in selling a lot of the horses that do get retraining and I am really strict on the right homes. Getting a look at what types of decisions have to be made behind the scenes has been an eye opening experience for me but one that I am very supportive of. Horses that will not have quality of life are given a peaceful end and I believe that is the right thing to do for them and for managing the limited budget.

    There is never a shortage of trainers who want to "donate" horses to the program but in many cases those horses have injuries that require a lot of time off. The are accepted based on funding but also keeping in mind that those horses may either need to be euthanized or kept for a long period of time until they are rideable. For each one of those we take it reduces the funding for the sound horses who can be transitioned into new homes quickly without a big drain on funding.

    I am just a volunteer but I have a lot of respect for these types of program and the people who run them. I am a strong supporter of programs that help transition ottb's into new homes.



  19. #19
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    Sunkissed Acres ;-)
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  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Risk-Averse Rider View Post
    Sunkissed Acres ;-)
    It is pretty obvious how much I love Sunkissed Acres
    I Loff My Quarter Horse & I love Fenway Bartholomule cliques

    Just somebody with a positive outlook on life...go ahead...hate me for that.



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