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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2008
    Location
    Tennessee
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    1,073

    Default Who pays for the vet check?

    A friend of mine is trying to sell a horse and another is trying to buy one and the buyer thinks she shouldnt have to pay for the vet, but I always thought the buyer paid for it... Just wondering. Thanks!
    *Paige*
    ~*It's not about the ribbons, but about the ride behind it"
    R.I.P. Teddy O'Connor



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul. 28, 2003
    Location
    carthage,nc usa
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    433

    Default

    I believe that it is the buyers responsibility.
    Gwen Dean
    Area II YR Coordinator
    Lost Hounds HT Secretary



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar. 19, 2007
    Posts
    285

    Default

    Buyer pays for the vet check.
    Work - feed - ride - shovel poop - repeat.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec. 28, 2008
    Posts
    1,418

    Default

    Buyer always pays for the vet check. I've never once paid for it (or been asked to pay for it) when I was selling. I have been asked to forward the vet history/any xrays I may have of the horse to the practice performing the vet check which I of course have no problem with but that's it.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2008
    Location
    Tennessee
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    1,073

    Default

    Thanks! I thought I was on the right page!
    *Paige*
    ~*It's not about the ribbons, but about the ride behind it"
    R.I.P. Teddy O'Connor



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct. 11, 2000
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    3,278

    Default

    The purpose of the vet check is to make sure you are making a sound buying decision for you intents and purchases, hence the reason the buyer pays for it if desired.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    May. 23, 2007
    Location
    Southern Indiana
    Posts
    2,546

    Default

    Yes, the buyer should select the vet and pay for the vetting. Worth every penny in the long run in my opinion.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2008
    Location
    Tennessee
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    Default

    how much is it? The girl said its like $500
    *Paige*
    ~*It's not about the ribbons, but about the ride behind it"
    R.I.P. Teddy O'Connor



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar. 29, 2006
    Posts
    1,097

    Default

    Vet checks can run anywhere from a basic checkup to full blown with xrays. As such, the price is HIGHLY variable.

    That said, I have had a buyer try to get me to pay for the vet check which I did not.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov. 16, 2000
    Location
    Concord, NH
    Posts
    4,981

    Default

    The buyer should pay because it is the buyer who wants it done for their own protection.

    And speaking of pricing- I had one vet ask me what the price of the horse was. After I'd told them what I wanted to check.

    As in "we'll set our price according to what you're paying for the horse" not "basic exam is $100 and each X ray is $50". I did not use that vet.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    May. 22, 2007
    Location
    a body in a chair-a mind in outer space
    Posts
    155

    Default

    Hilary, I've not heard of that practice. It seems to me to be a way to really sock it to someone buying an expensive horse. Is that a standard or ethical practice?



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep. 9, 2003
    Location
    Yellow Point, BC, Canada
    Posts
    1,042

    Default

    The only time I've heard of a seller paying for anything to do with vetting is if, during a ppe by a potential buyer, "something" turned up, the buyer walked and the seller wanted to investigate further to establish if this was a deal-breaker or a bargaining point, or nothing after all, for future sales potential and disclosure. This might also fit into the "honest sellers" thread.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Feb. 25, 2005
    Posts
    1,401

    Default

    The buyer should pay. The vet then has an obligation to make the disclosures regarding what is found during the exam to its client - the buyer, as opposed to the seller - and the buyer is in the position to decide how extensive the exam will be.

    Exams can be very cheap, if limited to flexions, for example; very expensive, if every joint in the horse is xrayed; or something in between. The extent of the exam (and thus the cost) is typically based at least in part upon the buyer's anticipated use of the horse and the horse's history (an exam for a horse that a buyer expects to take Adv. and that has already had an upper level career may differ significantly from one done by a buyer looking for trail riding buddy, for example).
    Treat Jockey for Spellbound and Smidgeon



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Nov. 5, 2002
    Location
    way out west
    Posts
    3,190

    Default

    I was horse shopping this summer and had three different vet checks by three different vets on three different horses. One was $900, one was $500, and one was $450. All included the basics, plus x-rays of the front feet and hocks. The cheapest check was by my vet; the others were done out of state by "neutral" vets recommended by my hometown vet.

    I was surprised by the $900 tab, but have had a bill as high as $1,200 for a horse I bought a few years ago. I think the sky's the limit if you want them to check more than the basic things.

    And as the buyer, I paid for it all.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Oct. 20, 2008
    Location
    Sunshine State
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    2,215

    Default

    I paid over $900 for my last PPE but we did something like 16 x-rays. (Front feet & legs, hind feet, hocks and stifles) Compared to the purchase price of the horse, it was worth it because I wouldn't have wanted to buy her and discover something down the road.

    I paid $250 for a basic exam on another horse and then another $150 when something came up that I decided needed x-rays. She was not an expensive horse but that $400 dropped on a horse I ultimately did not buy saved me TONS of expense down the road. I'd never even heard of a two-year old with navicular!

    Buyer pays, chooses the vet and decides how little or much will be done in the PPE.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Sep. 8, 1999
    Location
    Libertyville, IL USA
    Posts
    4,108

    Default

    Person who pays owns the information. If the seller were to pay, the vet would not be obligated to disclose anything to the buyer.

    FWIW, navicular on a 2yo. WB feet aren't read the same as TB or QH feet, if you were buying a WB, I hope you had a vet who was familiar with reading films of WB feet.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2008
    Location
    Tennessee
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    Default

    Gry2yng: Thank you for that information on the WB feet!
    *Paige*
    ~*It's not about the ribbons, but about the ride behind it"
    R.I.P. Teddy O'Connor



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Dec. 27, 1999
    Location
    Midland, NC, USA
    Posts
    7,260

    Default

    i've had vets ask me how much the horse was, but not to determine how much to charge, but how many protocols to recommend (if I'm paying $1500 for a horse, my vet is not going to suggest going full-bore on the vet check like if I was paying $15K for the horse!)

    Jennifer



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jul. 1, 2009
    Location
    Northern Virginia
    Posts
    1,146

    Default

    Buyer pays.



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Apr. 27, 2008
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    2,288

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Speedy
    The buyer should pay. The vet then has an obligation to make the disclosures regarding what is found during the exam to its client - the buyer ...
    For this reason I am surprised a buyer would suggest the seller pay. Although I'm sure a good vet would behave ethically, it's rather a conflict of interest to be paid by the seller.

    I bought a horse in the barn where I rode. Although the horse's long-time vet was to continue to be his vet, the vet agreed that another vet should do the pre-purchase exam because of his own relationship with the seller (he had been the seller's vet for a long-time, for several horses.) Bottom line, even though I think well of the horse's long-time vet, I wanted a pre-purchase vet that was clearly working for me and me only.



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