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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2003
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    1,377

    Default $292,000 to raise a child to 17 years! Some horses are cheaper!

    Emphasis on "SOME"!

    Did you guys see this?
    http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20090804/...parenting_cost

    $221,000 rises to $292,000 with inflation over the stream of years. This is not including education, such as college, which would come after the age of 17 anyway. That equates to $17,176.47 per year, for 17 years!!! Holy Mac! $1,431.3725 per month. Now, I'm sure there are people out there that are spending that much or more monthly, but there are plenty of us that do not. Especially those of us that have our own all inclusive farms (meaning all the facilities; just buy food and some labor, etc).

    In comparing horse expenses to child expenses, I don't know that it would be fair to include training expenses, since education is not included in the child expense article. That would be above and beyond. Would love to know the breakdown of the expenses factored in to arrive at the child rearing expenses.

    If a person is paying upwards of $800 per month in board alone, factor in some vet expenses, expensive shoes, etc., and over the stream of 17 years one could come very close (if not more) in horse expenses for ONE HORSE.

    Let's discuss . . . .



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar. 11, 2007
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    My own little world
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    243

    Default

    Add that to the long list of why I don't want children

    Plus, I'd never pay 800 per month for board...



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug. 26, 2008
    Posts
    878

    Default

    I bet it is even more with kids that own horses, you'd have to pay for the kid and the horse.
    “It's about the horse and that's it.” - GM

    !! is the new .



  4. #4
    Join Date
    May. 7, 2009
    Posts
    1,419

    Default

    Don't believe everything you read, we have 8 kids,a huge house, two ponies, cars that run ( not great but not horrible) and we make less than $65,000 a year. We eat, pay our bills, take care of two ponies, and enjoy some extra activities ( DH golfs, my boys have dirt bikes and 4 wheelers). My girls have all of their own riding equipment ( nice stuff in good shape) and we try to vacation each year. None of us are wearing rags either! Raising kids is only as expensive as you make it, and if they are raised well they get jobs and help support themselves by the time they are 13 -15. Not full time jobs but little jobs to cover their own spending ect.
    Kim
    If you are lucky enough to ride, you are lucky enough.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct. 29, 2008
    Posts
    1,659

    Default

    Hey Kim, I'm one of 8 kids too - but that is generations back. Good for you.
    We had lots of hand-me-downs, and we all babysat and did odd jobs in our teens to get spending money. Plus we all had summer jobs to contribute towards university costs.
    It absolutely depends on how you spend and use your $.
    I know places that charge $1200/mo board - with farrier, medical, horse-garments and lessons all on top - so that means way more than $1500 per month.
    We all have our priorities, and different circumstances and options. As I said - it depends.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr. 4, 2007
    Location
    Jasper, GA
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    2,148

    Default

    The issue with this is that without "seeing" the granularity in the numbers, they are meaningless.

    How did they interpret their data?:
    The average or the median of "costs?" Turns out the study used the average.
    This is critical. The median (place the numbers in value order and find the middle number), is going to be the truer number because if you take the true average...things can quickly go weird.
    This happens all the time and twists data into not representing reality.

    Take healthcare:
    The average costs will include the kid who had cancer and costs a million a year or a kid on life support or a kid with a broken back. The extreme costs of the "one in a thousand" kid will create an artificially high average. Whereas, the median numbers will essentially kick those numbers out.

    Take mortgage and rent (which will be factors in childcare raising costs because you need more space -they probably factored at least a bedroom per kid) So, it is the same deal:
    Mortgage and rent (which will be included in those numbers) vary wildly. The people in NYC with a 2 million $$ condo will pay a huge amount and will artificially inflate the average. If the median is taken, those numbers will be significantly different.

    The article did include child care/education. The author writes: "identified housing as the largest single expense, followed by food and child care/education costs." So, go ahead and include your trainer costs.

    So...if they are looking at the median then there is something to discuss. And yes, the study used averages...so it is just a waste of reading time and government money.
    Luistano Stallion standing for 2013: Wolverine UVF
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8IZPHDzgX3s



  7. #7
    Join Date
    May. 9, 2008
    Posts
    2,887

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by *JumpIt* View Post
    I bet it is even more with kids that own horses, you'd have to pay for the kid and the horse.
    I Loff My Quarter Horse & I love Fenway Bartholomule cliques

    Just somebody with a positive outlook on life...go ahead...hate me for that.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    May. 12, 2008
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    4,292

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Cielo Azure View Post

    The article did include child care/education. The author writes: "identified housing as the largest single expense, followed by food and child care/education costs." So, go ahead and include your trainer costs.
    Yeah, this struck me. I went to public school. Whether or not my parents wanted me to go to that school, they had to pay local taxes to support the school district.

    So me going to school did not increase their taxes at all. Now, would they be living in the same neighborhood if they did not have kids? No, they would actually have been living in a more expensive neighborhood. We ended up in our neighborhood because the house they were having built (semi-custom in an new development) was not ready when my older brother was born so they had to get out of that contract and find a house that was move-in ready.

    So that could skew the results!

    I am trying to figure out how my brother is paying $1500 a month on his daughter and cannot figure out how - unless he is going through a ton more diapers than I think he is!



  9. #9
    Join Date
    May. 12, 2000
    Location
    NE TN, USA
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    6,207

    Default

    I'm always leery of these "how much it costs to..." articles. Probably written by the same government bureaucrats that tell us how much money such-and-such program is going to save.

    Yeah, we're talking about you, Tim Geitner!
    “There are two ways to conquer and enslave a nation. One is by the sword. The other is by debt.”
    John Adams



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul. 13, 2009
    Location
    Canada
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    242

    Default

    Yep, that seems about right......the horse is considered to be another child, right? That's what I say at least--being a poor student and having a mother that loves the adopted horse-child is the only way I've been able to keep him over the years.
    BeesKnees
    Hunters should be galloping - George Morris



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Dec. 28, 2008
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    1,418

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by *JumpIt* View Post
    I bet it is even more with kids that own horses, you'd have to pay for the kid and the horse.
    My poor dad! He had to pay for me AND my show horses :gulp:. I don't even want to know what I've cost him in my lifetime! He would probably already be retired.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    May. 8, 2004
    Location
    PA
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    6,849

    Default

    You know, we're talking about raising human beings here. These little cost centers are the people who will run the world, populate it and move it all forward (or not) once all of us are gone.

    I'm not saying that children NEED to be "expensive." We're all over consignment shops for clothing, used bicycles and little things like, no television, to reduce our costs. But, I don't really have a problem with the next generation of humans costing this generation a few bucks. I mean, we cost our parents something, didn't we?



  13. #13
    Join Date
    May. 31, 2003
    Posts
    846

    Default

    Fact: having a horse AND having children both cost a lot of money.

    Nothing new! It's up to you to choose which one is more rewarding (or possibly both).
    Last edited by Equine Adhesive; Oct. 10, 2013 at 02:28 PM.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Apr. 5, 2007
    Location
    Tampa FL
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    663

    Default

    I find it really strange to compare child expense to any other one...
    I suppose your horse will be the one picking you up for Christmas when you're 80 years old... And how much would that be worth? There are some things you just cannot put a money value on...



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Apr. 14, 2007
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    Pen Argyl PA
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    Default

    i'm 40 and have no kids and only one horse. So-- Where's my extra Cash?



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jul. 31, 2007
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    15,953

    Default

    I'm all for "paying it forward" to the next generation by financing a good childhood and especially four years at the best college their little butts can get into.

    That was done for me and I am deeply grateful. In fact, the (expensive) college education made the able to think broadly and deeply, and to think that I had an obligation to make some kind of social contribution.

    That having been said, "all that money could buy" was not a necessary part of my childhood. In fact, having no money, but plenty of opportunity to go to work was probably a good thing for me.

    But these "putting a price on a kid" kinds of estimates, however crude, do have one good use: They may help people think hard about whether they 1) can afford to do a decent job raising a kid and 2) if they even want to pour such a hunk of money into that project.

    Raising kids is not a case of "If you have to ask you can't afford it," but "If you don't ask, you (and the kid, and possibly society at large) may suffer the consequences of your inability to afford it." Please ask.
    The armchair saddler
    Politically Pro-Cat



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Feb. 21, 2009
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    Rootown!
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    2,108

    Default

    I'm betting my parents spent more than that on me I had two horses and switched to a private school after our public school lost a bunch of money. I do get to go to college for free though So at least they're saving money there? I love my parents, they are the best



  18. #18

    Default

    I was one of 4 and I surely know my parents did spend that much per kid. I'm sure at the time they didn't earn that much more per month.

    Life was growing your own food, mom making clothes (she was excellent at both so I am grateful she taught me to sew)



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Nov. 2, 2001
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    Out for Lent
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    34,227

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by hellerkm View Post
    Don't believe everything you read, we have 8 kids,a huge house, two ponies, cars that run ( not great but not horrible) and we make less than $65,000 a year. We eat, pay our bills, take care of two ponies, and enjoy some extra activities ( DH golfs, my boys have dirt bikes and 4 wheelers). My girls have all of their own riding equipment ( nice stuff in good shape) and we try to vacation each year. None of us are wearing rags either! Raising kids is only as expensive as you make it, and if they are raised well they get jobs and help support themselves by the time they are 13 -15. Not full time jobs but little jobs to cover their own spending ect.

    LOL, like housewifes putting in the equivalent of 130some K a year in work, some things are free if you do them yourself, really expensive when you have to outsource them.
    Quote Originally Posted by Bristol Bay View Post
    Try setting your broomstick to fly at a lower altitude.



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jan. 12, 2004
    Location
    Florida
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    2,062

    Default

    I'm at a total loss as to the statistical basis for the data. The use of averages totally skews this study, as does some people's expectations for lifestyle (I was raised in a 1700 s.f. home with 2 siblings and my parents managed). I don't understand how it is factored that the addition of a child automatically results in a huge increase in housing cost. I am a single person and chose to buy a 3 BR/2 BA 1500 sf home, purely for my self and dogs. It's purely a matter of choice and lifestyle standards. Back in the 1970s and 80s siblings more often shared rooms, now that is considered unacceptable for most people (I guess I can understand given the fights that ensue when teen girls share a room!)

    Not a parent myself, but it seems that the most expensive years are the toddler years if daycare is required, and then the college years. Provided the kid does not attend private school (and does not ride horses ) the inbetween years should not require $17,000 per year....
    "Horses give us the wings we lack"



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