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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct. 3, 2002
    Location
    it's not the edge of the earth, but you can see it from here
    Posts
    12,079

    Question soo... wire is the 'hottest' electric, right?

    How would you run a combo of wire and 2" Polyweb for best zapping capability?

    Right now I find myself consistently adding a wire to my existing (10 years old) polyweb fencelines as I have two juvenile deliquents who are walking right through the polyweb. They aren't hungry, they just get bored. If left out beyond the time their belly is full, they go on walkabout.

    I have heard the polyweb breaks down over time and loses conductivity. At this point, I want to zap the cr@p out of them and get them back to being respectable citizens. I don't care so much about aesthetics, (I do love the look of the 3 strand polyweb.) but I do need to keep at least 2 strands polyweb--whether charged or not--for visibility for foals.

    Ideas? Suggestions? Cattleprods? Just kidding about the cattleprods. Mostly.

    (does anyone else get this overwhelming desire to hide next to the charger, wait for them to get to leaning, and plug it in??? That won't necessarily help, they seem to be pushing through 'between' clicks, if you know what I mean. But it would be very fulfilling. )
    InnisFailte Pinto Sporthorses & Coloured Cobs
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    Bits are like cats, what's one more? (Petstorejunkie)



  2. #2
    Join Date
    May. 20, 2003
    Location
    Middleburg, VA
    Posts
    3,032

    Default

    It sounds more like you need a stronger charger or having connectivity issues than anything else.
    How old is your charger? What is the voltage? Is it properly set up and connected? Is it the correct strenght for the distance of your fence? Is your fence blockage free (so no weeds/etc growing on it that would dilute the zap)?

    I've seen horses get one HELL of a zap from the web fence, but the charger was also pretty strong/relatively new/connected properly.
    Cherry Blossom Farm - Show & Field Hunters, Side Saddles



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct. 3, 2002
    Location
    it's not the edge of the earth, but you can see it from here
    Posts
    12,079

    Default

    While I don't have great ground, charger has a heckuva kick when put to wire. 5 copper groundrods driven about 3/4 of the way in each... copper ground wire, and plenty of moisture this year. I think the polyweb tines have broken down over time--we have WEATHER and have had severe, severe windstorms the past 2+ years... I can run the same distance wire on the same insulators and it'll be dandy, but they're walking right through the web.

    What I can't really do is *replace* 8.5 acres of polyweb...(with *anything* just at this moment, but especially not with all NEW polyweb) but I can reasonably add some wire, if that makes sense?

    The polyweb used to be hot, hot, hot. *I* am still quite well trained to it. The hooligans, not so much.
    InnisFailte Pinto Sporthorses & Coloured Cobs
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    Bits are like cats, what's one more? (Petstorejunkie)



  4. #4
    Join Date
    May. 12, 2000
    Location
    NE TN, USA
    Posts
    6,201

    Default

    Assuming you're NOT using the bi-polar type of tape, just run a strand of wire along or just above the top web. Whether or not additional insulators will be needed depends on the type you now have.

    A multi-lamp fence voltage tester will tell you how much *zap* is being transmitted down the fence, and if a larger charger is necessary. Digital types are also available, but more expensive.

    If you do need additional insulators, consider these. The removable pin makes it easy to adjust or replace the wire. Don't use them in corners, though. The wire tends to cut through the pin.

    It sounds like you have a good ground system at the charger, but if ground conductivity is poor in your area, you may need to extend the ground system. Download this installation manual and refer to page 4 for details.
    Last edited by Frank B; Aug. 2, 2009 at 09:23 AM.
    “There are two ways to conquer and enslave a nation. One is by the sword. The other is by debt.”
    John Adams



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug. 22, 2005
    Posts
    3,788

    Default

    If they are leaning under the fence jjjjjjjuuuuussssssttttttt reaching for that one more bit of grass and "Ooops! The fence broke!" -- then you need the hot wire on the bottom strand. Just about ear-tip level. I have electric rope and they can push mane-covered necks pretty hard against it without getting a shock. But let my bare skin just barely touch it, an it just about knocks me on my butt. I think I'm going to put a strand of electric twine on the bottom that has a greater ratio of conductive filiment to poly strands.

    If they are just giving you the finger and walking right through, then your hot wire needs to be about one foot inside your existing fence. HOWEVER, if your charger is not on 24/7/365 (except for very brief intervals for repairs/maintenance), then their disrespect is your fault. Electric holds the horses in by the brain. Once you let the concept of "Well, maybe the fence is off today" get rooted, the habit of respecting the fence is shot. Their working assumption has to be "the fence has always been hot, it will be hot now".

    Unless your charger is substandard, there is no way they can "push through between clicks" unless they are skinning under the fence (in which case the fence is simply too high off the ground) or are running full tilt. A right spry human can't even duck under/through a hot fence "between clicks". It'll get you at one end or the other...



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov. 6, 2002
    Location
    Henrico, NC 36 30'50.49" N 77 50'17.47" W
    Posts
    5,807

    Default

    We also have some old tape here and there. I always had problems with the tape until I ran a strand of #9 aluminum around the top of everything with drops down to the tape here and there. No problems for years since I did that.

    I like the #9 aluminum because it's large enough diameter not to cut flesh and doesn't corrode enough to matter. It's held in place by the black plastic brackets with an attached pin made for high tensile wire. Throw the nails that come with them away and use decking screws.

    The aluminum wire isn't the cheapest, but it's a one time expense with no upkeep.



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