The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 31
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec. 12, 2002
    Location
    Ontario <Living life for the journey not the destination>
    Posts
    1,616

    Default Broodmare going through colic surgery... Jingles needed

    My beloved broodmare, White Gold, was colicky yesterday and to make a long story short she ended up at the hospital and going through colic surgery. They found she was twisted and displaced so it was a good thing the decision was made quick to go the surgery route. Because we caught it quickly there was no need to take out any of the colon. She is doing good today and passed a bunch of manure over the night.

    Now for Part II... She was in foal when I took her there and the vets said she would have a 20% chance of losing the foal. I told them to start her on regumate (10cc 2x a day), which they have. A broodmare I purchased a few years ago has had colic surgery and she went onto have 3 more foals since the surgery. So I know it can have a positive outcome.

    Would love to hear stories where someone had a broodmare go through colic surgery and maintained the pregnancy. How was the foal when it was born? I have never had a horse go through colic surgery before and any advice or stories would be appreciated. How long until the mare is back on *normal* turnout...

    Of course, White Gold is going to have a long road to a full recovery now, which will include stall rest.

    Part III to the story. White Gold had a, not quite, two month old foal by her side. We left the foal at home so it would not complicate matters at the hospital. The foal (Lukas) was left alone for the day and when I got home we took a stall wall down and put a 2x10 across it. He is now allowed to go into his dams best friends stall (Princess Vera). Vera is so sweet and kind. She would walk around a fly if she could see it. Anyway the orphaned colt (Lukas) is being fostered by Vera. Vera also has a 2.5 month old colt by her side. Today I held Vera 3 times and she let the orphaned colt nurse. YAY. She will not let him nurse on her own but will as long as I stand there. She shares hay with both foals and both foals followed her around the paddock this morning. So it looks great that they will become a new family while White Gold goes down the road to recovery.

    So my question then becomes (maybe should be a different thread) what or how should I up the mares feed who now has two growing foals nursing off her. I want her milk production to increase, if that is possible. She is a BIG mare and if anything I would consider her on the fat side. So her condition is not an issue in the least.
    http://www.blazingcoloursfarm.com

    Join us on FACEBOOK
    Living life for the journey, not the destination.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr. 26, 2004
    Location
    Petaluma, CA USA
    Posts
    2,914

    Default

    Jingles for your mare and a huge hug to Vera for being so kind.

    First part of the question - I have had a mare colic and require surgery. She was 9 mos along and delivered a lovely healthy filly at 345 days. She was bred back and has had 4 foals since her episode with no further colic problems.

    As for Vera = can you give her Calf Manna? I have used it for years to increase milk production with fabulous results.

    Good luck, jingles and hugs.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov. 28, 2000
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    10,370

    Default

    sending lots of jingles for your mare and foal(s) and lots of pats for that good mare Vera.

    One concern I might have is that the foal might not be able to nurse often enough (are you holding the mare for him to nurse throughout the night?)
    Perhaps you could also introduce him to milk replacer, either by bottle or bucket, so that he has a 'back up system' in place, to ensure that he is getting enough, and has another option.

    GOOD LUCK!!
    A FINE ROMANCE - JC Reg Thoroughbred - GOLD Premium CSHA - ISR/OLDNA Approved
    CSHA Brickenden Stallion Award Winner - for Performance offspring.
    Please visit A Fine Romance on FB!



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep. 15, 2008
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    1,469

    Default

    I don't have any advice as I have never been in the situation. But I wish you the best of luck with your mare! I hope everything turns out well.
    I have actually heard from some tb farms that the hops in the beer helps to increase milk. This was also suggested to a friend of mine who just had a human baby. Not sure if it is safe for horses, but it was doctor recomended for humans.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar. 9, 2006
    Location
    Raleigh, NC
    Posts
    1,696

    Default

    I owned a crossbred gelding named "Kryptonite"--so named because the broodmare had colic surgery while pregnant with him. I think they gave a 60% chance of surviving. Clearly, he did, and the breeder decided he was "stronger than Superman"...

    Good luck!
    From now on, ponyfixer, i'll include foot note references.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul. 5, 2002
    Location
    FL
    Posts
    8,270

    Default

    Jingling like mad for your mare!!!



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun. 8, 2009
    Location
    Ontario
    Posts
    555

    Default

    I have use to work at a farm where there was a mare who had required not one but THREE seperate colic surgeries by the time she was 8 or 9 I believe...she went on to have 3 foals that I know of after that before being sold (she was 12 or 13 then) ...she delivered perfectly healthy and textbook everytime!! ...so it can be done!! Best of luck...my fingers will be crossed for you!!



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec. 2, 2002
    Location
    Waterford, VA USA
    Posts
    4,798

    Default

    I've had two mares that required colic surgery while they had a foal by their side and both times I sent the foal with them. I think it's much easier on the mare because the first thing they look for when they come out of anesthesia is their foal and some of them get very anxious if they don't see them.

    Eight years ago one of my mares had to have 27 feet of her small intestine removed and she is now 17 years old and has a foal by her side.

    Good luck!
    Siegi Belz
    www.stalleuropa.com
    2007 KWPN-NA Breeder of the Year
    Dutch Warmbloods Made in the U. S. A.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul. 14, 2004
    Location
    Virginia. We Do Ponies!
    Posts
    11,804

    Default

    Prayers & good wishes for your mare!
    Randee Beckman ~Otteridge Farm, LLC (http://on.fb.me/1iJEqvR)~ Marketing Manager - The Clothes Horse



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar. 17, 2006
    Location
    North Central Florida
    Posts
    1,380

    Default

    Best wishes for your mare! and her baby, of course!
    Sakura Hill Farm
    Now on Facebook

    Young and developing horses for A-circuit jumper and hunter rings.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Dec. 4, 2007
    Location
    Ontario
    Posts
    1,942

    Default

    Prayers for your mare!!!
    Riding the winds of change

    Heeling NRG Aussies
    Like us on facebook!



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Apr. 11, 2004
    Location
    North Florida
    Posts
    2,434

    Default

    Best of luck to you all.

    I, too, had a mare have colic surgery THREE WEEKS before foaling a HUGE foal (my love, Debonair who is now 17.2 hands). She then foaled him at home with the stitches still in........and both survived well (although I could have died from the nervous breakdown it just about caused me) . She did go on to have one more foal and again displaced her colon, and had to have colic surgery a second time (just after foaling that time)....so I retired her from breeding and she's now a lady's love and dressage horse in VA!!!
    www.flyingcolorsfarm.comHome of pinto stallion Claim to Fame and his homozygous son, Counterclaim. Friend us on Facebook!https://www.facebook.com/#!/pages/Fl...04678589573428



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Dec. 12, 2002
    Location
    Ontario <Living life for the journey not the destination>
    Posts
    1,616

    Default

    seigi b. That is incredible... 27 feet removed!

    Florida Foxhunter; 3 weeks prior to foaling with all that weight on her belly.

    ElegantExpressionsFarml 3 surgeries and still three more foals.

    These mares deserve some awards or something. And here I am freaking out over my mare having one colic surgery and only being 2 months along. I can not even begin to imagine this happening when she is a few weeks away from delivery. I would have had all white hair by the time it was all over.

    Thanks so much for the stories, it does make me feel better about our situation.

    No update on White Gold this evening, so I assume all is going well at the hospital. I should hear from them in the morning. The colt (Lukas) is doing quite well. He ate some foal pellets tonight and got to nurse a few more times. I have done a page up for him with photos of him with his auntie and big brother (though not related). Then below those photos are some of Lukas and White Gold taken a couple days prior to her getting sick... and the bottom is one of White Gold in the hospital a couple hours prior to surgery. http://www.blazingcoloursfarm.com/lukas.html

    Thanks so much for all the prayers and jingles. Both White Gold and foal seem to be on the road to recovery but we all know too well anything can turn for the worse at a moments notice. So I am praying for the best and hope White Gold can return home by the weekend.

    For a horse who just had colic surgery how long would be the *norm* that they are on stall rest?
    http://www.blazingcoloursfarm.com

    Join us on FACEBOOK
    Living life for the journey, not the destination.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Apr. 28, 2008
    Location
    California
    Posts
    1,846

    Default

    I knew a mare that had colic surgery at about 30 days into her pregnacy. She carried to term and foaled with no problems

    As far as stall rest, I've never had a colic surgery (knock on wood), but I had had an castration eviscoration, which is somewhat the same concept. Several feet of intestine had to be removed. He was on complete stall rest for a month, then gradual handwalking began. I believe it was about 3 months before he could be turned out again?


    Sending jingles for a continued recovery!
    Making Your Ambitions a Reality at Secret Ambition Stables.
    Quality Welsh Ponies and Welsh Crosses bred for sport
    Facebook Page.
    Section A and Section B Welsh Ponies at stud



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Dec. 12, 2002
    Location
    Ontario <Living life for the journey not the destination>
    Posts
    1,616

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Dressage_Diva333 View Post
    As far as stall rest, I've never had a colic surgery (knock on wood), but I had had an castration eviscoration, which is somewhat the same concept. Several feet of intestine had to be removed. He was on complete stall rest for a month, then gradual handwalking began. I believe it was about 3 months before he could be turned out again?


    Sending jingles for a continued recovery!
    Thanks! That is sort of what I thought. I am sure the vets will go over it all with me but just wanted to have an idea. I am quite sure that her colt will not be returned to her for this reason. I do not want the colt being on stall rest for 1-2 months. That would not be good for him and would be sure to drive his mom bannana's! Glad he is being taken on by his moms best friend.
    http://www.blazingcoloursfarm.com

    Join us on FACEBOOK
    Living life for the journey, not the destination.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jun. 9, 2003
    Location
    Alabama
    Posts
    5,457

    Default

    Jingling and wishing the best for your mare and her foal. Huge hugs and kudos to his foster mom -- what a wonderful mare!
    PennyG



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Dec. 27, 2006
    Location
    Hamilton, Va
    Posts
    311

    Default

    My mare had colic surgery for a nephrosplenic entrapment when she was 7 months pregnant. She was a huge Percheron mare, which I am sure complicated things a bit, at least for the surgeons. She did great, had a perfectly normal foal and went on to have many more after that with no issues. Good luck and wishing you the best possible outcome!



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Dec. 14, 2007
    Location
    Wilsonville, Ontario, CANADA
    Posts
    4,329

    Default

    Good luck with her. I hope that she pulls through okay, the foal she is carrying is just fine as well and her kid from this year adjusts to his rather abrupt and early weaning ...



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Sep. 30, 2001
    Location
    Down the road from HITS-Ocala
    Posts
    3,272

    Default

    Jingles!!!! I had a mare recover from colic surgery and foal a healthy foal. She was 4 months pregnant when she had surgery.
    As is our confidence, so is our capacity. ~W. Hazlitt

    Visit our website: Gift Hill Farm and on Facebook



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Feb. 1, 2003
    Location
    VT
    Posts
    634

    Default

    Last year I had a mare have colic surgery 20 hours post foaling due to an entrapment. They had to open up her intestines, but did not have to remove any. She did not have any complications and it was 3 months before she could go on normal turnout. We hand grazed her multiple times/ day so her colt could run around, but she was not supposed to move freely until the suture line was completely healed with no soft spots in it. The vets were very adamant about this since she was a broodmare and lots of stress would be placed on her abdomen. They wanted to make sure that everything was completely healed and strong so she did not herniate in the future. She did have one slightly soft spot (right near where her umbilicus would have been) that would NOT go away and I finally gave up and turned her out for the sake of her colt and it just eventually went away over the course of about 8 months. I'm glad I didn't keep her on stall rest until it was perfect!
    We did not breed her back last year because she was SO SKINNY due to lactating and not being able to eat normally for a while (my vet hospital was VERY conservative about letting me increase her feed after that - they said they'd rather see her skinny than risk colicing again...).
    She has not had any further problems and is now in foal to Rousseau for 2010. I am crossing my fingers for no problems......
    Good luck in your case. Jingling for your mare.

    PS - I once weaned a foal at 2 months old because her mother was SO mean to her. I put her in with another mare/foal and gave her milk pellets & grain. The other mare eventually let her nurse about 80% of the time she tried and she did perfectly fine.
    Last edited by ticofuzzy; Jul. 30, 2009 at 09:13 PM. Reason: So my sentences make sense.....



Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 265
    Last Post: Nov. 2, 2003, 07:16 PM
  2. Weight loss surgery & riding L.O.A
    By AWIP in forum Off Course
    Replies: 102
    Last Post: Sep. 11, 2003, 07:47 AM
  3. Replies: 164
    Last Post: Sep. 8, 2003, 05:58 PM
  4. Replies: 184
    Last Post: Feb. 23, 2003, 10:18 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •