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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug. 11, 2000
    Location
    Chantilly,va.
    Posts
    10,985

    Unhappy Lightening

    It happens to Olympians, too; from Becky Holders' wsebsitehttp://www.holdereventteam.com
    [FONT=MS Sans Serif][FONT=&quot]we had terrible news. Highland Hogan has gone on to greener pastures after being struck by lightning in his pasture last night. Rest in Peace .
    [/FONT]
    [/FONT]
    breeder of Mercury!

    remember to enjoy the moment, and take a moment to enjoy and give God the glory for these wonderful horses in our lives.BECAUSE: LIFE is What Happens While Making Other Plans



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul. 30, 2005
    Location
    England
    Posts
    10,938

    Default

    That's awful.
    Horse Show Names Free name website with over 6200 names. Want to add? PM me!



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov. 24, 2002
    Location
    Northern KY
    Posts
    4,497

    Default damn shame

    I really liked that horse.
    We had T-storms earlier, ok, the horses were in today. Cleared up around 7pm, so out they went. Saw lightning in the distance about an hour ago, check the radar, more storms on the way. Now the boys have 3 big run in sheds, and USE them when it rains or storms, but after reading this this morning, DH and I went back out and brought the three of them in. They come when I call and they see the lights, I have it set up so they can run straight out of the pastures into the barn, and they go in their stalls like circus horses.
    And of course, while it hasn't yet rained a drop, I feel better.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct. 16, 2006
    Location
    VA
    Posts
    1,134

    Default

    That is really sad.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    May. 28, 2008
    Posts
    103

    Default

    I live in central FL. and if I brought my horse's in every time it looked ominous or heard thunder, I would be doing nothing else. A lot of the times it looks like we are going to get a bad storm only to have it circle right around us without a drop falling.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug. 2, 2005
    Location
    Oxford, USA
    Posts
    3,735

    Default

    My guys were in last night, went out late the night before, and stayed in the night before that. Lightning is my worst fear, even though we are in a valley. My sympathy to any and all horse owners who lose a critter that way!
    Anne
    -------
    "Where knowledge ends violence begins." B. Ljundquist



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr. 7, 2005
    Location
    summerville GA
    Posts
    3,219

    Default Lightning

    This is so terribly sad and yes it happens. Can I always get the horses in, no. And as DG once saw at this farm, lightning came right in through a stall door. We were so lucky it hit the rubber matt we were standing on.

    Days before that, ironically, I lost a new rescue I had had such high hopes for. I adored him and strangely enough, his name was Lightning and I immediately changed it to Boomer.

    My neighbor lost four in one strike and another neighbor lost 11 cows. It happens, there is nothing we can always do to prevent it.

    I am so sorry for there loss.
    Our horses are not seen as the old and disabled they may have become, but rather as the mighty steeds they once believed themselves to be.

    Sunkissed Acres Rescue and Retirement



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct. 29, 1999
    Posts
    14,409

    Default

    I think horses health (physical and mental) is very dependent on lots of turnout, and them being comfortable with a routine, EXPECTING to be out with their buddies at certain times. I think constantly switching their turnout times around to avoid storms is stressful. That regular mild stress on a horse IMO is what opens the door for them to be the ones that catch that illness - Strangles, Neurologic Rhino, what ever else comes down the pike. I don't think you avoid that death risk, just switch the risk around to something else.

    Horses relaxed on a regular turnout routine may walk right past that horse at a showgrounds with a disease without catching it, but the horse with added stress from never knowing what to expect in their turnout life is probably the one with the lowered immune system, and will pick it up.

    The above, combined with the fact that I know people that have had their horse killed IN the barn by lightening, tells me that I am not eliminating risk, and IMO, not reducing that risk.

    The added risk of having a horse not go, or do, what their instincts tell them to go or do when they sense a storm coming, but learn to be dependent on people, or expect to be taken in, line up at a metal gate, is NOT what I want. Horses that are not listening to their instincts will be even more at risk when the day comes that you are stuck in traffic, away at the show, and the neighbor can't get to them in time, or sleep thru the beginnings of an unexpected storm.

    This next 10 day forecast, every day has a chance of thunderstorms. What do you do? Keep them in for 10 days? DEFINITELY not healthy!

    They say lightening is dangerous when the storm is still many miles away, but you always see people scrambling to bring their last horses in when the storm is very close, or even right on top of them. People SAY they get them in WAY early, but often, that can't be the reality. Those horses, not to mention people are at MUCH increased risk all the way around.

    Another question is, would you rather lose one, instantly, never knowing what hit them, or a barn full, slowly, and painfully to fire, if the lightening sparks a barn fire? I know my answer to that one.

    Finally, I ask myself the question, of what I could live with more? Would it be easier to live with losing a horse in the field where they are supposed to be at that time of day? Or is it easier if I make a decision to bring/keep them in, and THEN I lose one BECAUSE of my decision to change their turnout schedule? No doubt about my answer to that one either.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    May. 28, 2008
    Posts
    103

    Default

    Years ago in NY at a TB breeding farm a bolt of lightening came thru the alley way where we were cleaning stalls, struck a mare at the end in her stall and then traveled outside and struck a mare in the field literally blowing her out of her shoes. The mare struck in the barn eventually died and the one in the field was killed immediately.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug. 11, 2000
    Location
    Chantilly,va.
    Posts
    10,985

    Thumbs up Good for you!

    We had T-storms earlier, ok, the horses were in today. Cleared up around 7pm, so out they went. Saw lightning in the distance about an hour ago, check the radar, more storms on the way. Now the boys have 3 big run in sheds, and USE them when it rains or storms, but after reading this this morning, DH and I went back out and brought the three of them in. They come when I call and they see the lights, I have it set up so they can run straight out of the pastures into the barn, and they go in their stalls like circus horses.
    And of course, while it hasn't yet rained a drop, I feel better. http://www.chronicleforums.com/Forum...tons/quote.gif
    breeder of Mercury!

    remember to enjoy the moment, and take a moment to enjoy and give God the glory for these wonderful horses in our lives.BECAUSE: LIFE is What Happens While Making Other Plans



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Apr. 14, 2006
    Location
    Saco, Maine
    Posts
    4,732

    Default

    I will NOT leave my boys out if there is a threat of T&L. It makes me crazy. They stand out there in the middle of nowhere, begging a bolt to come find them. Under trees? In the thousand dollar shed? No way. Right out there on the knoll, in the middle of the wide open space. Forget it, I go out and drag them in. Benefit of having them at home, I guess.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    May. 28, 2008
    Posts
    103

    Default

    Your horses would hardly get to go outside in Fla then and you would be anorexic running out every time you heard thunder! andddddddddd they can get stuck standing in the barn...read above!



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan. 19, 2002
    Posts
    133

    Default

    If you have UL listed, properly installed, the correct amount, and voltage supressed lightening protection on your barn, it will not burn to the ground if struck and it is MUCH safer than standing outside in a lightening storm. I can say this from experience!



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Aug. 10, 2004
    Posts
    2,317

    Default

    I was just kicked in the ass trying to get my horses in the other night when a storm was rolling in. It looked like it was going to be a bad one so I thought it would be good to get them in (I usually leave them out, but for some reason I thought I should bring them in this time - small lapse in judgment on my part). I went to put the halter on my gelding and something spooked him. He spun around and kicked me right in the right butt cheek. It hurt like a sumbitch. Thank god it wasn't four inches higher...I'd be in the hospital. The horses stayed out and I have a big (and I mean BIG) purple butt cheek.
    Honey badger don't give a sh!t.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Feb. 8, 2004
    Location
    Rolling hills of Virginny
    Posts
    6,025

    Default

    Someone I know lost two of her horses about 3 weeks ago to lightning.

    It's horrible and tragic, and not as uncommon as people might think.

    My condolences to everyone who has lost an animal this way.
    Homeopathy claims water can cure you since it once held medicine. That's like saying you can get sustenance from an empty plate because it once held food.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Feb. 9, 2009
    Location
    it used to be country
    Posts
    689

    Default

    Lightning is one of my big fears. I have been Zinged, but I also know of horses that were killed in the barn, it did not burn, it hit a tree outside the stalls, and killed two horses. It was an old dairy barn, with a lighning rod, this was about 30 years ago. Mine have a run in, so they choose. Good or bad, I think it is a no win.
    Hmmm pretty pointless post here, but I am bored.....



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