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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May. 5, 2006
    Posts
    2,899

    Default Ever Called The Vet Out And...

    ...felt totally silly by the time they got there? I am still mentally kicking myself and I have had a couple of hours to let it sink in.

    I had an 8 a.m. lesson scheduled this morning. I got to the barn around 7:30 and glanced at my gelding in his stall as I walked by on my way to the tack room. I was getting my tack together when the BO walks in and tells me that my guy has a "fat eye". I hadn't seen anything wrong a few minutes before, but hadn't really looked closely. I headed out to his stall run to get a look in day light and sure enough, his right eye is swollen pretty much shut.

    Okay. There is garbage spread all over the indoor cross-tie area that the interior of my gelding's stall looks out on, so the idea quickly forms that maybe a raccoon got in and made a racket and my guy spooked and banged himself in the process.

    I cleaned it out with a homemade saline solution. No gaping flesh and his eyeball was intact and looked unscathed. The upper lid was abraded, like he had skinned it when he banged into whatever. I iced it for about 10 minutes, gave him a couple of grams of bute and put some antibiotic ointment on it before turning him out with his fly mask on. My instructor and I both agreed that a lesson wasn't a good idea, so that was canceled and she helped me clean him up. He looked a little better by the time he was turned out, not as swollen.

    Okay, so I have lunch with a friend and before I meet her I swing by the barn to take a look at his eye. The swelling is back and there is a fair amount of heat. I get worried and decide to call the vet. I mean, I could have missed something when I examined him earlier. I was thinking that there might even be a splinter in all that swelling, and if that was the case he would probably need to be sedated to get it out. Plus, I just knew that if I figured that the vet was not needed on a Friday afternoon, sometime on Sunday morning it would become shockingly apparent that he did, in fact, need the vet out.

    I call the vet, explain the situation to him and he says (of course) that he should come out and take a look to be on the safe side. So out he comes.

    And of course, as soon as I made the call and committed to the vet, his eye didn't look all that bad. He was eating fine, and drinking. And when the vet actually got there, he agreed with me. My horse is fine, although he looks like he went a few rounds with Mike Tyson. He didn't even have a scratch on the eyelid, just that one abrasion that I had cleaned out earlier. No splinter. No pierced eyeball.

    And, to add insult to injury...when I was icing his eyelid this morning he stepped on my foot. When I had the chance to sit down and take my boot off I found out that he had ground the lower portion of the nail on my big toe into the nail bed. I am missing half of my stinking toenail now, it was pulverized by his great big hoof. And the whole toe is swollen and black. And it really, really hurts. How ironic is THAT?
    Sheilah



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep. 5, 1999
    Location
    Central FL
    Posts
    4,432

    Default

    I can relate.

    Was walking a gelding out one morning when he stopped to pee. I was paying NO attention until we started to walk away from the ENORMOUS puddle of blood.

    Panicked call and vet visit later.....

    He had chosen to stop and pee on the grass where Mr. FlightCheck had sent an armadillo to Jesus earlier in the day....sigh.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar. 18, 2007
    Posts
    338

    Default Yes

    Glad his eye is ok. Sorry your toe isn't. I used to be at a co-op barn. Our joke was that I called the vet if a horse sneezed, Lady 2 called if they were three legged for a week, and Lady 3 called if all four legs were stiff and their
    eyes were little "x"s. My vet has a swimming pool and a very nice house - I don't.

    Always better to play it safe and not berate yourself is something does go south.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr. 22, 2008
    Posts
    804

    Default

    Yeah... I think vets would rather be consulted "just in case" (assuming you do it calmly and respectfully) than only be consulted after things have gotten very, very bad.

    You paid your vet for the visit, so I'm sure the vet was fine with it. Consider it a price for peace of mind.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb. 5, 2008
    Location
    Bluffs of the Broad River
    Posts
    810

    Default

    I know you feel silly now. But eyes are funny. And you would feel way worse if something really was wrong and you didn't call.
    There are stars in the Southern sky and if ever you decide you should go there is a taste of time sweetened honey.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    May. 5, 2006
    Posts
    2,899

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by HiddenAcres View Post
    My vet has a swimming pool and a very nice house - I don't.
    Yeah, I get that same feeling whenever I look at the huge honking rock of a wedding ring his wife wears.
    Honestly, he is a fantastic vet and I don't begrudge him the fruits of his labor. But I just know that I have paid for a very large portion of that ring!

    On the bright side, this time he didn't have to pump anything into or out of my gelding. I am thinking that the bill will be less that $150 this time. My piece of mind is worth that amount. Mostly
    .
    And you're 100% correct. I would have felt horrible if I hadn't called him out and there was something actually wrong. Better to feel silly than heartbroken.
    Sheilah



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar. 5, 2009
    Location
    In a barn
    Posts
    967

    Default

    Oh, your poor toe!! Heal Fast!!

    I've called the vet out for nothing 3 times in a row, on the same horse, within a 3 week period. Talk about feeling stupid. First time it was a swollen eye, that magically wasn't swollen by the time the vet came. Second time, it was swollen glands under the jaw - no longer swollen when vet got there. Third time, a snotty nose - didn't matter that it was realllyyy snotty when I made the call, because by the time the vet came, nadda.

    By this time the vet was thinking that I was one of those people who 'holds pillows over their horse's face ' to get that sickly, bluish tinged complexion, then dials 911 for sympathy. Sigh. (HaHa though - horsey turned out to have alergies, so I wasn't a dingbat after all!) Plus, I paid for each and every false alarm.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct. 14, 2004
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    9,026

    Default

    No reason to feel silly at all. I too would never fool around with an eye issue. Too much to go wrong and it can go down hill very quickly. Better to be safe than sorry.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep. 11, 2003
    Location
    Nuevo Mexico
    Posts
    4,253

    Default

    Better safe than sorry, especially with an eye. I've made unneccessary vet calls more than once, and when the bill comes, I try to remind myself that it would have been a lot bigger and a lot worse if the horse had actually been (fill in the blank).

    My favorite is not HR...When I was in younger, I had a pet rabbit. My mom noticed one day that there was a strange new swelling between her hind legs. Mom pointed it out to me, and I freaked out - it was like this huge tumor that suddenly appeared out of nowhere. Of course, it was on a weekend, and I made dozens of calls before I found a vet that would see a rabbit emergency. Vet asked on the phone if I was sure the rabbit was a female and politely suggested that the swelling might be testicles. I laughed and said, I know testicles when I see them, it's a female rabbit, and she has a giant tumor. It must be painful because she doesn't want me to touch it.

    So I brought the rabbit to the vet, and guess what? Diagnosis: Testicles. Apparently rabbits are not easy to sex when they are young, and the testicles can sometimes take more than a year to drop. $200 to find out my rabbit had testicles. No matter what kind of silly equine vet call I make, I don't think I can ever top that one.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    May. 5, 2006
    Posts
    2,899

    Default

    No, you're right. I don't think any vet call could top the rabbit testicles. Although having seen some pretty scary looking rabbit testicles, I totally understand how their sudden appearance could cause concern.
    Sheilah



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug. 30, 2007
    Location
    Illinois, USA
    Posts
    8,233

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Vandy View Post
    Better safe than sorry, especially with an eye. I've made unneccessary vet calls more than once, and when the bill comes, I try to remind myself that it would have been a lot bigger and a lot worse if the horse had actually been (fill in the blank).

    My favorite is not HR...When I was in younger, I had a pet rabbit. My mom noticed one day that there was a strange new swelling between her hind legs. Mom pointed it out to me, and I freaked out - it was like this huge tumor that suddenly appeared out of nowhere. Of course, it was on a weekend, and I made dozens of calls before I found a vet that would see a rabbit emergency. Vet asked on the phone if I was sure the rabbit was a female and politely suggested that the swelling might be testicles. I laughed and said, I know testicles when I see them, it's a female rabbit, and she has a giant tumor. It must be painful because she doesn't want me to touch it.

    So I brought the rabbit to the vet, and guess what? Diagnosis: Testicles. Apparently rabbits are not easy to sex when they are young, and the testicles can sometimes take more than a year to drop. $200 to find out my rabbit had testicles. No matter what kind of silly equine vet call I make, I don't think I can ever top that one.
    I'm sorry, but that just made me laugh so much. I wonder what on earth the vet wrote down for his report? "Female rabbit had a bad case of testicles?"
    Tell a Gelding. Ask a Stallion. Discuss it with a Mare... Pray if it's a Pony!



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jun. 6, 2007
    Posts
    1,962

    Default

    Waiting until an injury/illness has either really deteriorated or has become low-grade/chronic can end up costing way more to diagnose and treat than something acute. 'Right now!!!' may be over the top for a lot of vet emergency calls but sooner is usually better than later.
    Don't beat yourself up. (And most vets I know with $$$$ started out with $$$ behind them..it's not that lucrative )
    * <-- RR Certified Gold Star {) <-- RR Golden Croissant Award
    Training Tip of the Day: If you can’t beat your best competitor, buy his horse.
    NO! What was the question?



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jul. 2, 2005
    Posts
    1,644

    Default

    I once called for a squamous cell cancer or some other kind of skin cancer. The vet came out and picked off a clump of mud. Did I feel dumb????
    ********
    There is no snooze button on a cat that wants breakfast.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Apr. 9, 2005
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    1,237

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bank of Dad View Post
    I once called for a squamous cell cancer or some other kind of skin cancer. The vet came out and picked off a clump of mud. Did I feel dumb????
    Okay, you win. That cracked me up! Yet I know that you called the vet because you're conscientious.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Dec. 19, 2007
    Location
    Aldie, VA
    Posts
    1,597

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bank of Dad View Post
    I once called for a squamous cell cancer or some other kind of skin cancer. The vet came out and picked off a clump of mud. Did I feel dumb????
    Having just gotten back from hauling my horse to the vet, this made my day.

    Thanks!

    Eileen
    Mad Mare™ Studio
    Custom Swarovski®, Czech glass and gemstone browbands in Circlet, Diadem and Tiara styles. Matching stock pins, bracelets and belts.
    http://MadMare.com



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jan. 13, 2003
    Location
    where there is no snow in the winter
    Posts
    653

    Default

    I tell my clients never let the sun set on a bad eye (as well as a few other maladies).

    You were correct to call



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Feb. 3, 2000
    Location
    Nokesville, VA
    Posts
    35,218

    Default

    It is always better to call a vet for something suspicious that turns out to be "nothing" than to delay and have it turn into an emergency.

    My best "false alarm", though, comes from my sister's and my first pony ( a leased 16 yo former show hunter mare), Jilly.

    We had her for a year, proving to our (non-horsey) parents that we really would do the work to look after a horse, and we weren't going to lose interest.

    So the next step was to buy a second horse, Rocket, a gelding, for me, in the autumn.

    Shortly thereafter, Jilly have some strangee syptoms that my mother was sure was a serious kidney problem, and she called the vet.

    When he got there, before he even looked at Jilly, he asked my mother to describe the symptoms-

    Frequent urination of small amounts
    Appearing to strain when urinating
    Bucking if, when mounted, we put our hands behind the saddle
    Pinning her ears and acting as if in pain
    etc.

    He sat there on a hay bale, while my mother described the symptoms, with a slight smile on his fence. My mother was feeling very annoyed- our pony appeared to be seriously ill, and the vet was sitting there smiling.

    Finally, she finished, and he said:
    "Mrs. Gunn, you have just described ALL the symptoms of a mare in heat."

    She was SOOO embarrassed.

    It had never happened in the previous ear, but was apparently trigered by Rocket's arrival.
    Janet

    chief feeder and mucker for Music, Spy, Belle and Tiara. Someone else is now feeding and mucking for Chief and Brain (both foxhunting now).



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jul. 30, 2005
    Location
    England
    Posts
    10,619

    Default

    I would've called the vet for that too. Eyes are nothing to mess about with.

    (Says the woman who just hauled her horse to the vets for more antibiotic cream for a weepy eye.)

    Hope your toe isn't too sore!
    Horse Show Names Free name website with over 6200 names. Want to add? PM me!



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Oct. 18, 2000
    Posts
    22,442

    Default

    When in doubt - call the vet.

    Having said that.... many years ago, in a boarding barn, far far away, a great adventure took place.

    It was a dark and effing cold night. Middle of winter - everything frozen - all we want to do is go home. But we go to the barn, make sure our horses have plenty of hay and warm water and are comfortable in their stalls.

    Friends mare will NOT move. Mare is in her stall, looking freaked out. Rapid, shallow breathing. She won't let us touch her, but she won't walk. Any time she tries to take a step she stops - hoof in mid-air, eyes get as wide as saucers - and she puts her hoof down gingerly.

    Well - what does one do but call the vet? Mare looks like she's about to die standing up because she's afraid to lay down and die!!!!


    Vet gets there. We're standing outside the mare's stall with the door open - just clucking like a couple of old hens. Please Mr. Vet - save this mare!!!

    Vet stands there, looking at the mare. Arms folded. We stare at him. Then we stare at the mare. We cluck a little more.

    Finally the vet arrives at a decision.

    He pronounces, very loudly and dramatically - and stabs his index finger in the air to punctuate his words......

    "I diagnose.................... STATIC CLING!"


    Mare was blanketed and the air was very dry and cold.
    We didn't realize it but every time she tried to move she got zapped. We couldn't see anything, we couldn't hear anything - but zap zap zap.

    True story.



  20. #20

    Default

    yep

    esp when he looks at me and says "why did you call me out here,again??
    Production Acres,Pro A Welsh Cobs
    I am one of the last 210,000 remaining full time farmers in America.We feed the others.



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