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  1. #1
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    Mar. 17, 2008
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    Cool Help...switching to jumpers!!

    Hey guys. After almost three years with my mare, my trainer and I have decided that her true calling is not hunters (which we have been doing for the past almost three years) but jumpers. After agonizing over it for two months, I've come to terms with it and I'm kind of excited to try my hand at jumpers! The only problem-- I'm 16, so I obviously live with my parents. My mom is TERRIFIED of the jumpers, she just thinks they're horrible and dangerous. So help--how do I break this to her??



  2. #2
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    Jumpers is not any more dangerous than hunters. A well-ridden jumper round is a controlled, well planned out riding effort. It should not be the crazy-azz tail-on-fire rounds that people new to it think it is. Ride with control and purpose, not crazy speed.



  3. #3
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    I know. And I have two trainers who do jumpers. She does not believe that it is as safe as hunters, despite what they say >.<



  4. #4
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    Ditto Rye. At many shows one will see crazy turns, lightning speed, and a "GIT!" thrown in somewhere. However, those are the speed bump jumpers where many ponies and horses run around like lunatics. If you watch the riders doing the 3'6" and up classes they are much more controlled and are not running around course. They have a much forward, going rhythm, but are not out of control. Ride your jumper course with a forward rhythm but still with smoothness and control.



  5. #5
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    Try explaining it as an equitation round with neater turns. That IS what a jumper round should look like - have you or your mom ever watched McLain Ward? He looks like he is going so slowly, but he makes the whole course smooth and soft and beautiful, which makes him faster than everyone else most of the time. It's not about speed, it's about being smooth, efficient, and effective.



  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by supershorty628 View Post
    Try explaining it as an equitation round with neater turns. That IS what a jumper round should look like - have you or your mom ever watched McLain Ward? He looks like he is going so slowly, but he makes the whole course smooth and soft and beautiful, which makes him faster than everyone else most of the time. It's not about speed, it's about being smooth, efficient, and effective.
    Having ridden at a very high level jumper-only barn which has some of the best jumper riders in the country, and at most shows has 4-8 horses in the Grand Prix, I certainly wouldn't describe a jumper round the same as an equitation round with neater turns. Some horses may look like they're going slowly, but in actuality, they are burning up a huge amount of real estate very fast. I'm not sure how anyone can claim jumpers aren't about speed - the classes are measured by speed, with the fastest and cleanest round winning. And to say that only low level riders make "crazy" turns is to deny reality. I saw one of our riders make a turn right in front of a 4'5" jump and jump it easily. It looked crazy when he did it, but I had seen him practice turns like that on a regular basis. The nearest rider in the class of 50 was over 2 seconds behind. That wasn't a fluke for him as he was consistently rated in the top ten junior jumper riders throughout his junior years. The riders who win the upper level classes and Grand Prix and World Cup classes are the ones who are faster AND make some amazing turns AND take all of the options possible. Some shows have easier low level jumper courses that don't require a bunch of hard roll-backs and tight turns, however some shows have technically difficult low level jumper classes - it all depends on the show.

    I agree that the well-ridden jumper round is well-planned. I believe that distances and pace are even more important in jumper rounds because of the sharper turns, often very few strides between obstacles and hard roll-backs. And yes, I agree there is a big difference between riding a very forward jumper and riding a horse that is just racing around the course.



  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dun Ciarain View Post
    I certainly wouldn't describe a jumper round the same as an equitation round with neater turns. Some horses may look like they're going slowly, but in actuality, they are burning up a huge amount of real estate very fast. .
    You totally missed supershorty's point. The GOOD riders are doing the turns, going fast, etc, but they make it look like an eq course. The round is smooth, flowing, well-executed. It does not have the frantic balls-to-the walls, do-or-die impression that the scary riders do.

    Yes, the fastest, cleanest horse wins....but that is not usually achieved by speed, which is probably what this mother worried about. Fast and clean is achieved by great prep, a great plan and great execution.
    Keith: "Now...let's do something normal fathers and daughters do."
    Veronica: "Buy me a pony?"



  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by RugBug View Post
    You totally missed supershorty's point. The GOOD riders are doing the turns, going fast, etc, but they make it look like an eq course. The round is smooth, flowing, well-executed. It does not have the frantic balls-to-the walls, do-or-die impression that the scary riders do.

    Yes, the fastest, cleanest horse wins....but that is not usually achieved by speed, which is probably what this mother worried about. Fast and clean is achieved by great prep, a great plan and great execution.
    I agree that those riding like they are in a barrel racing class are dangerous. Depending what table the class is run under makes a big difference. Sure, the first round of a Grand Prix is supporsed to be a very smooth and flowing round. The jump off is all about speed. Almost every rider takes the same line and it gets down to who is going to push it too the limits in terms of speed and making those more extreme turns. Speed classes are all about how fast you can go and not have any faults in the one and only round. I really can't say that I've seen any jump-off rounds of classes between 1.10m and Grand Prix look like an eq. round.

    The margin for error is much less in a jump-off than a hunter round, so in that case it is more hazardous.



  9. #9
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    Oct. 16, 2000
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dun Ciarain View Post
    I really can't say that I've seen any jump-off rounds of classes between 1.10m and Grand Prix look like an eq. round.

    The margin for error is much less in a jump-off than a hunter round, so in that case it is more hazardous.
    I have ridden with a world class Jumper Trainer as well, and I HAVE seen WINNING GP jump offs that look like Eq rounds. One of my Trainer's most used mantras was -- you don't win by going fast, you win by making good turns. Richard Spooner is a prime example of this ride...

    Jumpers is NOT anymore dangerous than Hunters -- pilot error is pilot error, and I've seen terrible mistakes in Hunters as well.

    Seb
    \"The Truth is contagious, and I haven't washed my hands in days...!\"-- Stephen Colbert
    www.janearmour.com



  10. #10
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    Jun. 8, 2009
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    I just did my first time in the jumper ring a couple weeks ago!! haha i had a thread about it too. my mom was a nervous reck too. but i assured her that if anything goes wrong its my fault and id get what i deserved which i either falling and eating dirt or a lesson without stirrups ect.
    Another girl at my barn has been doing jumpers for a long time but just started leasing my assitant trainors horse who is crazy!! and she came out of the ring in tears because her horse was being crazy. and my trainor asked her mom if she was scared and she was like no its just part of her lerning to ride this horse and everything. lol.

    Just ride it kinda like an equitation course with more pace. Good Luck. and youll have sooo much fun! but a arning...once you do jumpers your addicted!



  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sebastian View Post
    I have ridden with a world class Jumper Trainer as well, and I HAVE seen WINNING GP jump offs that look like Eq rounds. One of my Trainer's most used mantras was -- you don't win by going fast, you win by making good turns. Richard Spooner is a prime example of this ride...

    Jumpers is NOT anymore dangerous than Hunters -- pilot error is pilot error, and I've seen terrible mistakes in Hunters as well.

    Seb
    Well, considering Richard Spooner's nickname is "The Master of Faster"...



  12. #12
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    Jan. 19, 2005
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    Quote Originally Posted by VandyLover View Post
    So help--how do I break this to her??

    Tell her you want to start eventing and then use the jumpers as your compromise to her.... I'm an adult and my mom still doesn't come watch my events....or when she comes, she hangs out at the trailer with a beer or other adult beverage while I'm out on xc! (I did jumpers before eventing)

    Honestly, Jumpers is more dangerous than Hunters. The fences are bigger and you are going a lot faster...well you are if you are trying to be competitive. You get her comfortable with it by saying that you are a responsible rider, you enjoy what you are doing, you have good trainers and you have a good horse. She should be more afraid of what you are doing when you get you driver's licence than ANYTHING you do on the back of a horse!!!!
    ** The difference between genius and stupidity is genius has its limits. -- Albert Einstein **



  13. #13
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    Jan. 23, 2000
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    Start low and promise to school everything you'll be doing in competition carefully.

    Jumpers IS faster, yes. But it does NOT need to be frightening.

    Even when I'm doing the 3'6" jumpers, especially on my current horse, the goal is to ride it like an eq course with a little more pace. Ideally, there should NEVER be moments of being discombobulated and out of control.

    At the lower levels, I found that more than half the time I won by keeping a smooth but forward pace, making smooth inside turns, and leaving the fences up.



  14. #14
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    Mar. 17, 2008
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    thanks for all of your advice :]
    I might break the news to her tomorrow, as we're driving to Tennessee, that way, I can present my argument without her running off

    She shouldn't really be worried about speed--i've been getting the step on a horse more inclined to double-adds. Can you say warp speed?



  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by VandyLover View Post
    I know. And I have two trainers who do jumpers. She does not believe that it is as safe as hunters, despite what they say >.<
    Has she looked at the jumps? Seriously. I think a 3'6" ao or junior hunter course looks a lot more scary to lope down to (those jumps look solid ) compared to the 3'6" jumpers which are a couple poles in the air.

    Jumpers are only as scary as you make it. Tell her not to watch other people cause you have no control over them or what their riding plan is so it could scare her. Assure her your riding plan is not the same as the out of control scary looking ones.

    I am not going to lie--my falls have been in the jumper ring, but that is primarily where I show. If I showed in the hunters, then I am sure I'd have some falls there too. But all my jumper falls have been things that totally could have happened in the hunter ring (horse slipped cantering & fell for example) as well. Accidents can happen anywhere.
    "I'm not crazy...my mother had me tested"



  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sebastian View Post
    I have ridden with a world class Jumper Trainer as well, and I HAVE seen WINNING GP jump offs that look like Eq rounds. One of my Trainer's most used mantras was -- you don't win by going fast, you win by making good turns. Richard Spooner is a prime example of this ride...
    As is McLain Ward (I've had the pleasure of watching him go the past few days at HITS, which is why I keep mentioning him - he's on my mind). Smoother is faster. I saw Laura Chapot today take 5 seconds off the leading time in a speed class, but the round was smooth, beautiful, and not at all frightening to watch.

    Dun, I think you totally missed my point - neater turns with that more open canter that jumpers have is more efficient than the balls-to-the-wall galloping that you see in the lower level jumpers. If I were a nervous mother, I would take some comfort in knowing that running like a lunatic wasn't the "way to do it." My trainer sets priorities for the jumpers; the first priority is going clean, followed by neat turns. Speed is the third priority, out of 3. Her system works (at least for me); thinking that way, I was able to be competitive in the low juniors and move up to the highs without major issue.
    Last edited by supershorty628; Jul. 24, 2009 at 05:34 PM.



  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by supershorty628 View Post
    My trainer sets priorities for the jumpers; the first priority is going clean, followed by neat turns. Speed is the third priority, out of 3. Her system works (at least for me); thinking that way, I was able to be competitive in the low juniors and move up to the highs without major issue.
    Well said.

    Years ago I got a blue in a jumper class with an ancient TB hunter. He was old, slow, and hunter through and through. I knew he wasn't going to be any faster than anybody else, and I wasn't sure how much I could push the turns, so I decided I'd make things easy on him, and just set out to have as clean a round as I could. Rode it like almost like a hunter course. When I finished, my trainer shouted from the side of the ring "Could you possibly have done that any slower!"

    We were the only ones who went clean in that class



  18. #18
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    Jul. 30, 2008
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    Explain to your mom that good riding is good riding, whether you're riding in hunters or jumpers. People who just gallop around a jumper course and get away with it are the ones that make it seem like it is more dangerous. If you and your horse are prepared and ready to show at the level you're doing, it isn't any more dangerous than hunters.



  19. #19
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    Aug. 21, 2007
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    Chances are that you mom is terrified of allowing her teenager daughter, you, do the jumpers is because of past experience. At the upper levels the jumpers is a controlled and finessed sport.
    However, it is more than likely that your mother has seen the smaller, more local jumper classes. That being said many times a rider will ride quite dangerously simply to be the recipient of that oh-so-lovely blue ribbon. Maybe bring your mom to a show where you know the competition will have good ring etiquette and go from there. Have your trainer explain to your mom about the division because she likely doesn't understand the "going ons" of the jumper ring.



  20. #20
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    May. 7, 2008
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    Have your mom come watch me ride C; No really just explain to her that you don't have to be going 90mph to win or place for that matter but you do have to have a well laid out course and stick to your plan. Its easy and simple, today I was showing in a local jumper derby and several of the girls were out of control and just flat out race horse galloping their horses, I went in on my hunter (Who shows jumpers just for fun) Got him around did our jump off had a plan, stuck to it, legthened our stride and just were effieceint our time was 27.08 the closest to us was 35.65 and that was one of the out of control hard to watch if they slip and fall they'll get hurt bad rides. Did it feel like we were boogying it no not at all, but we just had balance and ground covering on our side.

    Explain to her what its about and I agree with everyone else have her watch some jumpers that are in control go around and talk her through it. (My mom didn't want me doing jumpers either so I said well its jumpers or we'll go prelim next year for eventing she choose jumpers)



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