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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct. 3, 2007
    Posts
    291

    Default WWYD: To Geld or Not To Geld???

    Opinions please! I have a lovely 10yr old TB stallion that I'm considering gelding. Here's why:

    When I acquired my lovely guy, my plan has always been to eventually breed him to produce a nice hunter for myself. He's never been bred and has an absolutely wonderful disposition 85% of the time (the rest of the time he behaves like a hard-headed stallion). I've been boarding him, and can no longer predict when I will own my own farm in order to facilitate breeding him.

    So, I'm playing the "what-if" game. My fear of gelding him is that he has an old suspensory, which hypothetically could eventually become fried - then I'd have a beautiful pasture ornament that I have to continue to board, and I'd be a horseless rider. This poses a dilemma, as I will NEVER rehome this guy.

    Would you hold out, wait for your farm, and hope your boarding situation NEVER changes (as there are few places who are willing to accomodate a stallion)??

    OR

    Would you give up on your dream of having a baby by your absolute-dreamboat-of-a-horse and just go ahead and geld him to spare everyone the headache of dealing with a stallion??



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar. 8, 2004
    Location
    Baltimore, MD
    Posts
    19,719

    Default

    He could go lame with or without testicles. To me there is no reason to keep a horse entire to possibly make one foal with him someday. There are so many nice stallions out there to chose from for very little money that have proven they pass along the desired traits. Its still a crap shoot but much less so than with an unproven stallion that you don't even know is fertile. You could always freeze some semen before you gelded him if you were dead set on having his foal.
    If you do geld make sure he is laid down and the vessels tied off, not just crimped. The pressure is too high to trust the crimps to hold.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan. 12, 2009
    Posts
    288

    Default

    The dilema of owning a stallion.
    Been there done that several times.
    If he is manageable ridable showable and you have a place to board him its motte point.
    If you really needs his swimmers collect n freeze enough to ensure you get 1-2 foals eventually and cut him.
    The down side is while a herding animal by instinct he lives a rather solitary life unless he has a pony pasture buddy and spring w/ the smells of estrogen can be tough on his mind and body.
    I am struggling w/ teh same issue, but for diffrent reasons.
    Horse is pretty much gay so mares don't cause a behavior factor but his equipment is well endowed and there for may impact on his gaits down the road. If I cut him I will collect ample amounts to ensure a few foals. If we can get him interested 1st...mare pee is not an aphrodesiac for him.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar. 17, 2006
    Location
    Sunbury, NC
    Posts
    1,789

    Default

    I, too, would suggest the frozen semen route. Yes, it'll cost money and effort to get it done, but in the end that solves many of the problems - you'll always have the ability to breed to him, and then the "headache" of trying to find him a place to live is also resolved. Plus, it puts him out of turmoil having all the hormones and not able to breed. Just MHO!
    Signature Sporthorses
    www.signaturesporthorses.com



  5. #5
    Join Date
    May. 15, 2009
    Location
    Eastern Ontario, CND
    Posts
    2,191

    Default

    If you want some objective opinions about his prospects as stud you could post some pictures :\

    You've left him a stallion this long, I'd leave him until you need to make a decision.
    "For some people it's not enough to just be a horse's bum, you have to be sea biscuit's bum" -anon.
    Nes' Farm Blog ~ DesigNes.ca
    Need You Now Equine



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct. 3, 2007
    Posts
    291

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Signature View Post
    I, too, would suggest the frozen semen route. Yes, it'll cost money and effort to get it done, but in the end that solves many of the problems - you'll always have the ability to breed to him, and then the "headache" of trying to find him a place to live is also resolved. Plus, it puts him out of turmoil having all the hormones and not able to breed. Just MHO!
    I know! I'm beginning to feel like it's morally wrong to put him through the frustration of NOT being able to breed; though, he has no idea of what he is capable of.

    I have considered freezing semen and then castrating him. What are the implications of this route? Set-backs? Fees? Process?



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct. 3, 2007
    Posts
    291

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Nes View Post
    If you want some objective opinions about his prospects as stud you could post some pictures :\

    You've left him a stallion this long, I'd leave him until you need to make a decision.
    I'm not concerned about the results of his offspring. The desire to breed him is more of an emotional tie I have to him, the desire to have a piece of him passed on to the next generation.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    May. 4, 2003
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    14,147

    Default

    I, for one, understand your need to keep a piece of him in is offspring - that is my sentimental side. My more sensible side says that freezing is expensive and his heritability has not been proven and you still need the perfect wonderful mare. I have my mare's grandchildren now and for some reason I get huge satisfaction from that. Having my own homebreds was always a dream of mine.

    I also know or have known of several stallions and their owners who dreamed of this route and eventually found the hassle and the life they offered the stallion not worth it.

    Have you had his semen tested for freezing?

    There are several proven TB stallions out there that would be perfect - checkour the COTH threads here!



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct. 3, 2007
    Posts
    291

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Foxtrot's View Post
    I, for one, understand your need to keep a piece of him in is offspring - that is my sentimental side. My more sensible side says that freezing is expensive and his heritability has not been proven and you still need the perfect wonderful mare. I have my mare's grandchildren now and for some reason I get huge satisfaction from that. Having my own homebreds was always a dream of mine.

    I also know or have known of several stallions and their owners who dreamed of this route and eventually found the hassle and the life they offered the stallion not worth it.

    Have you had his semen tested for freezing?

    There are several proven TB stallions out there that would be perfect - checkour the COTH threads here!

    Please pardon my ignorance. I can have him tested first to see if he will, in fact, freeze? - so, it's not so much a crap shot?

    If he's the perfect stallion now, then he'll be an even more perfect gelding, won't he? I'm so torn!



  10. #10
    Join Date
    May. 16, 2001
    Location
    Alaska. Not in an Igloo.
    Posts
    8,993

    Default

    IMHO, If you have to ask, its probably best to snip him
    Seig Heil Polo Shirt!



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct. 3, 2007
    Posts
    291

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Pirateer View Post
    IMHO, If you have to ask, its probably best to snip him
    HAHA! The voice of reason and most likely true!

    Thanks to everyone for your input!



  12. #12
    Join Date
    May. 7, 2004
    Location
    Linden, CA
    Posts
    851

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by NeverEnd View Post
    Please pardon my ignorance. I can have him tested first to see if he will, in fact, freeze? - so, it's not so much a crap shot?
    You can have him tested to see if it thaws well or not, but even if it thaws well, it's possible for there to be issues that can't be seen under the microscope, but will keep the sperm from inseminating. In the end, with frozen, you don't know what you have until you have your first pregnant mare from it. THEN you know what you have.
    Quote Originally Posted by HuntrJumpr
    No matter what level of showing you're doing, you are required to have pants on.



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