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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec. 8, 2007
    Posts
    419

    Default Should I look for a new horse?

    Update:
    Vet came out. Toby will only be good for light riding. Strengthing will help, but not fix. I asked his old owner if they wanted him back, they have no room. But are asking around. She suggested outting him down. I'm so sad. This sucks.



    I got my horse, Toby, about 6 weeks ago.He was very out of shape, was out in a field for 2 years and not much done with him the 2 years prior to that. Toby is 17. I LOVE this horse. He is amazing with my children, very quiet, safe and SANE!
    BUT 2 weeks ago he did something to his stifle. I gave him a week off. Then started light work. On Saturday I put my 10 yr old on him, as he looked good on the lunge. She got on him and he started dragging his toe and was so so , um... sticky. Not off, but obviously not sound.(If that makes any sense).
    So I got him to be my horse. So I had something to ride and play with and love. I want to do litte shows here and there. Toby would be perfect for this. If I can ride him. But what if I can't? I am not a horse expert by any means. I do not know how long he should take to recover from this, and I know it is a life thing now. Do I look for another horse that can be what I want? I would not really be able to keep 2 horses. It would be a stress for the board each month. I feel really responsible to Toby. My family loves him. I love him. But I also don't want to pay board for something I can't do much with.
    Any opinions? Am I terrible for even thinking of this?
    Last edited by Mamy; Jul. 15, 2009 at 11:01 PM. Reason: Update



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun. 5, 2006
    Posts
    937

    Default

    Give him time. A week isn't enough for a stifle injury. Acupuncture, massage, chiro, estrogen, etc etc......slowly back to work, lots of long slow up and down gradual hills on straight lines....the fitter you can get and keep him the better.....lots of options before you give up.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov. 3, 2003
    Posts
    1,685

    Default

    I agree, give it a little more time. I had a horse like that. Here's what I learned:

    I would also seriously look at his hind hoof angles. Get him very erect on those feet around 55 degrees -- no long toes and good breakover. It's incredible what a difference it makes.

    Also, it helps to massage in a little absorbine on the stifles before you ride just to help loosen them up.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec. 21, 2005
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    517

    Default

    Stifle injuries are common in horses that have been out of work for a while. If this horse was in a field for 2 years you need to bring him back into work slowly. Perhaps treat him like a young horse, don't do anything that's intense exercise and keep your sessions short. Long walking trail rides over gently sloping hills are a good way to get started. You can move up to trotting once he gains some fitness. Lunging a horse puts the horse in a constant turn and is actually quite a workout for an out of shape horse. Your horse's stifle injury might have improved, what you saw on the lunge line was probably him anticipating pain in his stifle if he wasn't still feeling sore there. You probably need a trainer to help you develop a plan to recondition your horse. Its only been 6 weeks so I wouldn't give up on him yet. My advice to you is to just take it slow and use this time for bonding with your new horse. There are lots of things you can do with him that are low impact that will improve his condition slowly. If you have them available I would start with trail rides.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov. 22, 2003
    Location
    Southern Maryland
    Posts
    1,267

    Default

    Just to give you a sample schedule..if your horse was laid up for a medical reason here's a something to consider from somthing like a bowed tendon:

    riding under saddle for 30 mins for 4-6 weeks
    after 6 weeks, adding 5 mins of trot per week.

    This would mean it would take another 10 weeks to get 1.5 hrs of riding.

    Agreed, you've prbably expected too much too fast.
    Experience is what you get, when you didn't get what you wanted.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec. 8, 2007
    Posts
    419

    Default

    thank you!
    first, sorry for poor typing my wiggly 7 month old is helping....

    we were going super super slow. only trotting and i did not ride him for more than 30 minutes. i thought i was doing the right thing, going slow. i had just started lateral work at the trot when he got injured.

    right now i gave him another week off. then i was/am going to do a week of hand walking up about a mile long trail that is up hill. then start him under saddle again.

    trainer keeps telling me to trade him in....
    i am giving him msm now also.
    i was worried my weight on him would be too much( I am 150 lbs) but if it's not then i will ride him and not hand walk him for our hilly walks.

    thank you all! i think i just had a bad day and i have a few people telling me to get a new horse. i guess it just got into my head.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan. 31, 2003
    Posts
    18,472

    Default

    You really need to call the vet.

    And quite frankly.. if your trainer hasn't told you to do this... rather has told you to "trade" the horse...

    you might need to call a different trainer, too.
    "Kindness is free" ~ Eurofoal
    ---
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec. 25, 2008
    Posts
    265

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by EqTrainer View Post
    You really need to call the vet.
    And quite frankly.. if your trainer hasn't told you to do this... rather has told you to "trade" the horse...you might need to call a different trainer, too.
    I wholeheartedly agree!



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar. 7, 2003
    Location
    Mudville, GA ;-)
    Posts
    9,186

    Default

    I was also thinking that to myself.... I would definitely have a vet out before I decided to give up and get a new horse! A week or two isn't that much time in the grand scheme of things.
    Y'all ain't right!



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar. 7, 2005
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    1,174

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by EqTrainer View Post
    You really need to call the vet.

    YES! I had one that came up with what I thought was a stifle injury and it turned out to be EPM. Have the vet out pronto.
    If you cannot set a good example, at least serve as a terrible warning....



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Apr. 28, 2009
    Posts
    2,108

    Default

    This post is a little bizarre.... unless there is some underlying behavioral issue that would make you want to get rid of a horse, you don't just trade him in because he has an injury WITHOUT even consulting a vet. I agree, I think you need a new trainer and not a new horse. First step is to get a vet out and find out what is going on. You most likely brought this horse back way too quickly and he pulled his stifle. Lunging is the last thing you want to do with a stifle injury. So do the horse a favor and stay off of him and get the vet out so you can enjoy your new horse! Good luck.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar. 8, 2004
    Location
    Baltimore, MD
    Posts
    19,713

    Default

    I am just curious here. What exactly does it mean to trade a horse? Do you put him back on the shelf at Walmart and take the one in the box next to him and hope you have better luck? Do you say you have a lame horse and want a sound one and hope someone will swap? Do you send them to slaughter and pocket the $300 to put towards another one? I really have no concept of what that means.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Dec. 8, 2007
    Posts
    419

    Default

    Wow, this took an ackward turn. I really only needed to hear not to give up. It was just one of those days for me. I think we all have them.
    As for the slaughter comment- um no. I don't and won't and would never EVER send a horse to auction. I'm not looking to "pocket" money.

    Yup, I need to get a vet out. And yes I did not like the trainers comment. I have heard it from a few people, and just needed some sense knocked into me I guess.

    Thank you fo the responses.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Nov. 4, 2003
    Location
    Sanger, TX, USA
    Posts
    4,835

    Default

    Yep, I think I'd be looking for a new trainer. To make that comment without a vet visit
    and just a week off...wow! Trainer sounds more interested in keeping her revenue stream
    flowing than either you or your house. He (the horse) sounds like he's worth putting a
    little $$$ to figure out the problem and some time into recovery.
    Julie
    www.centaurfencing.com
    Safer, Stronger, Lasts Longer!
    Godspeed BARBARO--Run fast and free!



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jul. 27, 2007
    Location
    Behind the Orange Curtain
    Posts
    9,694

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by EqTrainer View Post
    You really need to call the vet.

    And quite frankly.. if your trainer hasn't told you to do this... rather has told you to "trade" the horse...

    you might need to call a different trainer, too.
    Mamy, my trainer can be conservative with vet care too. I'm just not. I call the vet out immediately if one of my horses looks sore or I have a question- it's just not worth it to me to let something go that could turn worse

    I suspect your trainer thinks that there was a masked problem of some sort that isn't going to go away, but you don't know that unless you call the vet out (FWIW, the trainer my pony was with when we got him thought he'd been drugged when we tried him out- trainers can have interesting theories )



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    40,492

    Default

    You don't sound like you know what is really wrong, just assume it is his stifle.
    Without a vet exam, you really don't have much to go by.

    Why was the horse "turned out for two years"?
    Was it to see if he could recover from some injury?
    If it is his stifle, did he and will he always have a problem there, would injecting it help, surgery?
    Was something like this tried already before?

    I would say there are way too many questions for the information given to make sense and so any advice can't be more than a mere wild guess.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    May. 8, 2008
    Location
    Near Auburn, Alabama
    Posts
    418

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Laurierace View Post
    I am just curious here. What exactly does it mean to trade a horse? Do you put him back on the shelf at Walmart and take the one in the box next to him and hope you have better luck? Do you say you have a lame horse and want a sound one and hope someone will swap? Do you send them to slaughter and pocket the $300 to put towards another one? I really have no concept of what that means.

    When you purchase a new horse, you have purchased a horse, not married a spouse or become a parent. If that horse, for whatever reason, proves unsatisfactory, the owner should get rid of the horse by whatever means he/she deems suitable.
    Then hope to buy a horse that better suits the owner's needs. What's so difficult about that?

    Also, the last horse sale I went to the less desirable animals were selling for $40, not $300. I assume the $40 horses were headed to slaughter, so selling horses for slaughter isn't exactly a pocket-filler.



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jul. 24, 2006
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    5,388

    Default

    Stifles can take a long time to strengthen. I have an OTTB who's been in regular work for 2 years (and less-than-regular work for almost a year before that). He's had a wonky left stifle since the day I got him and it's SLO-OWLY been getting better with an intensive amount of chiro, acupuncture, massage therapy, and conditioning work (hills, dressage lessons, etc.). So maybe your trainer is just anticipating a long road to "recovery" and that's why s/he's recommending you move on???

    But I agree with others. I would have a vet evaluate the horse and try to determine what's going on. In my guy's case his entire pelvis was "sheared" (basically shifted off to one side) and it's taken a long time to fix that through adjustments and then toning the muscles to hold it in place (to oversimplify things a little). His is certainly a "worst case scenario" on the still-fixable side of things. With that being said, he's moving up through the levels exceedingly well despite his stifle and will make the move to the 1.20m (4') jumpers next week at a show. Galloping around courses and jumping makes him *that* much better each time we show, so it certainly hasn't been a "competition-killer" like so many issues can be.

    Anyhow, I guess my advice would be to give your guy a chance. A week is nothing in terms of an injury or pain coming from somewhere. And 6 weeks is really nothing in terms of getting back to work. I just started a little mare I picked up and my pony back to work after a year off (for the mare) and 5 years off (for the pony). I was just looking at my workout chart and realized that the mare has now been back to daily work since March 15th, which is coming up on 4 months, and I'm just now starting to think of her as somewhat fit. The pony has been back to [not-quite-as-regular] work since late January and I STILL don't think he's anywhere near being truly "fit." Enough to jump around a little, sure, but not FIT fit.

    Anyhow, those are just my two cents.

    Good luck with your boy!



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Nov. 22, 2003
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    7,136

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mamy View Post
    Wow, this took an ackward turn. I really only needed to hear not to give up.
    No, what you needed to hear was, GET A VET OUT!!!



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Nov. 22, 2003
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    7,136

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mamy View Post
    BUT 2 weeks ago he did something to his stifle. I gave him a week off. Then started light work. On Saturday I put my 10 yr old on him, as he looked good on the lunge. She got on him and he started dragging his toe and was so so , um... sticky. Not off
    Honey, that's LAME!!! SOMETHING is WRONG. And you may well have caused it.



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