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View Poll Results: America is overweight. Are American's horses overweight, too?

Voters
94. You may not vote on this poll
  • Henneke Scale 1-2: - poor or very thin; rescue or very ill

    0 0%
  • 3-4: - thin, moderately thin - no hip bones, faint ribs

    10 10.64%
  • 5: - moderate - ribs felt, but not easily seen

    52 55.32%
  • 6-7: - mod fleshy/fleshy - indiv ribs felt but fleshy, maybe back crease

    28 29.79%
  • 8 -9: - fat/extremely - can't feel ribs, crease down back, thick neck, obvious fat deposits

    4 4.26%
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 33
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2003
    Posts
    1,377

    Default America is overweight. How about our horses?

    I know some of us have horses horses with various metabolic issues. Too thin, too fat, or maybe in the middle. Some of it is man made starvation, man made metabolic problems from overfeeding/killing with kindness, or some is genetic.

    How do your horses rate?
    Last edited by Fantastic; Jul. 8, 2009 at 01:36 AM. Reason: changed title



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2003
    Posts
    1,377

    Default

    I voted for #3, 5 - moderate. Wish I could have voted for more than one, but I don't know how to create that option. I do have a couple of fatty-prone horses that I monitor; they are in the Jenny Craig pasture and wear grazing muzzles. I also a few young ones that are slightly less than a 5. I don't believe in killing with kindness and keeping young horses (or any horse for that matter) purposely obese.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug. 26, 2008
    Posts
    876

    Default

    I disagree, I think most horse people take better care of their horses than they do themselves, I know I sure do. I only know of one horse that is truly obese and his owner is blind to it. Every other horse whether fat or skinny is getting the appropriate feed and their owners are doing their best to get them to their optimum weight.

    Just my 2 cents.
    “It's about the horse and that's it.” - GM

    !! is the new .



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep. 12, 2008
    Location
    Central NY
    Posts
    734

    Default

    My QH looked like a fat pig to me when I bought her. She was turned out to pasture for 2 years before I bought her.
    Giving her a regular job lunging & riding every other day has definitely put her in better shape, although she retains a bit of a "grass belly" in summer.

    I recently sent pics to her former owner showing her our progress and her comment was, "Looks a little thin, remember QH are supposed to be stocky."



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec. 13, 1999
    Location
    Greensboro, NC
    Posts
    35,763

    Default

    Wish it was a multiple choice poll - have multiple horses!

    TB mare is a lean 5, but out of work but still muzzled 23 hours a day WB gelding is a 6
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan. 2, 2008
    Location
    Colorado Springs, CO
    Posts
    1,395

    Default

    I voted 5, but she's more like 4.5 - 4.8 TB.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan. 23, 2005
    Posts
    759

    Default

    I have a fat mare, but she's a rather un-athletic air fern. She gets hay and just a handful of grain twice a day, and she has fat rolls.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar. 13, 2006
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    457

    Default

    I think that there is a problem with people not seeing their horses as fat. I have two thoroughbred eventers who are fit, and I do have to fight a bit to keep weight on them sometimes, but they look good (one is a good 5 and the other in harder work varies between a 4.7 and 5 depending on workload, he actually gets more bulk the more work he's in). I know many people who see them and say "oh, boys, I wish you momma would feed you more calories" because their horses are literally on the verge of foundering - thick crests, no definition in their flank area (bulging out even), actual fat rolls in the rears, and winded after 20 minutes of walk/trot. When I mention something about a diet or a bit more of an exercise program, they say "well I guess I could stop feeding them that rice bran supplement and that extra hay" (most of these horses are on very nice, well kept pastures anyway!

    Really?



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec. 19, 2007
    Location
    Camden, DE
    Posts
    1,948

    Default

    I just wish I could get my TB to gain weight at the rate that I can.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr. 8, 2005
    Location
    Kentucky
    Posts
    4,376

    Default

    I'm fat, but most of my horses aren't. The QH lady that lives nearby thinks my ASBs are thin, I think her QHs are obese. At least mine grow up sound.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct. 19, 2005
    Posts
    7,320

    Default

    Most horses I see are in the 6 -7 range. I trimmed 5 horses yesterday - 4 were obese, one was grossly obese (Arab mare), only one looked normal, and they all got this way on just pasture. The 4 obese horses also all show signs of IR (all had fat deposits above eyes).

    I have also frequently experienced owners mistaking weight for muscle mass.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan. 8, 2006
    Location
    B.C. Canada
    Posts
    1,919

    Default

    NA horses are a rule *when not neglect cases* are on the heavy side when it comes to weight. When I lived and trained in Europe, I was surprised at the difference in weights on horses and mentioned it to my trainer at the time, who was before his death a very famous trainer. His reply was. "North american horses look like pigs and move like them too"

    I was more then a tad taken aback, believe me, but after spending a number of years over there, and then returning to NA, I ha the same issue- I kept thinking omg, these horsws here are SO fat!.

    Now my eye is trained back to NA standards, but .. yeah, we definitely keep ours plumper.
    Quote Originally Posted by ExJumper View Post
    Sometimes I'm thrown off, sometimes I'm bucked off, sometimes I simply fall off, and sometimes I go down with the ship. All of these are valid ways to part company with your horse.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    May. 4, 2003
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    14,218

    Default

    Well, I have this problem see, my 6 y.o. wb just gets chubbier and chubbier. She has stopped growing finally, and gets quite a bit of work, but it is so hard to cut down when I've always had TB's to feed. I don't want to make her miserable, or get ulcers and she's only on local hay and a teeny bit of grain/vits (way less than recommended). I'm feeding a small flake five times a day and will see if I can make a difference. May take a while, but if I measure and stay accurate it should make a difference.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jan. 18, 2009
    Location
    Pacific NW
    Posts
    1,755

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by rainechyldes View Post
    NA horses are a rule *when not neglect cases* are on the heavy side when it comes to weight. When I lived and trained in Europe, I was surprised at the difference in weights on horses and mentioned it to my trainer at the time, who was before his death a very famous trainer. His reply was. "North american horses look like pigs and move like them too"

    I was more then a tad taken aback, believe me, but after spending a number of years over there, and then returning to NA, I ha the same issue- I kept thinking omg, these horsws here are SO fat!.

    Now my eye is trained back to NA standards, but .. yeah, we definitely keep ours plumper.
    LOL, good quote

    And having NA horses I don't even take offense!

    In general, I think horses here are way too fat. People like the fat slick look and in some places (certain breed and type shows) it is rewarded.

    And lots of people freak if you can see a healthy bit of rib...I'd rather see that than excessive fat......
    Turn off the computer and go ride!



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Oct. 19, 2005
    Posts
    7,320

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Foxtrot's View Post
    Well, I have this problem see, my 6 y.o. wb just gets chubbier and chubbier. She has stopped growing finally, and gets quite a bit of work, but it is so hard to cut down when I've always had TB's to feed. I don't want to make her miserable, or get ulcers and she's only on local hay and a teeny bit of grain/vits (way less than recommended). I'm feeding a small flake five times a day and will see if I can make a difference. May take a while, but if I measure and stay accurate it should make a difference.
    Get a slow feeder or start soaking the hay



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jun. 20, 2006
    Posts
    524

    Default

    My horse is fat, almost too fat.
    It kills me to put him on a diet, but I have.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Aug. 28, 2006
    Posts
    10,000

    Default

    I'd say right now that my big horse is a 4, and my pony is a 6. She wears a grazing muzzle when the grass is good, otherwise she would blow up like a balloon.



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Apr. 7, 2007
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    3,035

    Default

    I needed multiple options for multiple horses. I've got 2 that are at a great weight. Then I've got 2 older mares carrying probably 30 extra pounds. A stud carrying 50 extra pounds and a gelding with horrible grass belly carrying 100 extra pounds. BUT, he has no fat pads. So, the scale is only accurate in certain cases. I have a mare that I can feel her ribs easily (see a faint hint) but she has a huge fat pad on her tail head, behind shoulders and a bit of a crest to her neck.



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jan. 16, 2002
    Location
    West Coast of Michigan
    Posts
    36,321

    Default

    Two are a five, one is a six. I'm a five.
    Click here before you buy.



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Nov. 18, 2004
    Location
    Catonsville, MD
    Posts
    6,894

    Default

    Katy's about a 4.6, I'm about a 6. She's stall rested for the time being, so we are trying not to let her get full of energy that has no good outlet. Whereas I need more turnout, and less grain. My employer fails to see the value of more turnout, however.
    I tolerate all kinds of animal idiosyncrasies.
    I've found that I don't tolerate people idiosyncrasies as well. - Casey09




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