The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Results 1 to 11 of 11
  1. #1
    short_stack Guest

    Default Please critique this video!

    I haven't ridden in about six years (took time off in college and grad school) and now, at 24, I am getting back in to the swing of things. I have been riding for about two months and I am currently leasing the quarter horse mare shown in the video. She is 14 years old , used to be a western trail horse, and began jumping a year ago. She is currently owned by a 14 year old girl who likes to get up and go so she is a challenge for me because I am trying to break her bad habits (not bending, pulling, rushing fences, etc.). Thanks for your constructive criticism

    Its a very short video, just one jump!

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gt4Xi5aQSuk



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar. 30, 2008
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    48

    Default

    try not leaning forward as much. It usually tells horses "GO!" and to not slow down and relax.

    I wouldn't have believed that you took 6 years off if you hadn't said it, so props for that!



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct. 29, 2007
    Location
    TN
    Posts
    1,870

    Default

    I feel your pain! I'm also riding an ex-Western QH mare that was most recently leased by a 13 year old.

    Agree with the lean back, also pick your eyes up around the turn and keep her straight. I think your stirrups could go up a hole, but it was hard to tell from the lighting.
    "Things turn out best for the people who make the best of the way things turn out." ~John Wooden

    Phoenix Animal Rescue



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan. 12, 2004
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    2,043

    Default

    I agree that stirrups should go up at least one hole. You look really good to my intermediate-level eye. My biggest comment (and this is largely based on my own experience/weakness) is that your leg is coming forward and needs to be strengthened. This is a challenge to most riders, and it is always tough to come back to riding and reestablish these muscles.
    Work on it by posting trot without stirrups, and two-point several times around the ring at the trot during each hack. If you are riding often and practicing this consistently, your leg will improve.
    "Horses give us the wings we lack"



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan. 29, 2003
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    1,999

    Default

    Definitely stirrups up a hole.

    You anticipated the jump in this video which will encourage the mare to want to rush the jump. Two strides out, you got a little busy with your seat and then went into your 2 point too early and too exaggerated for such a small jump causing your mare to leave too early as well.

    Over an "X" and especially with a horse that tends to rush, you barely need to give a release - staying more controlled in your hip angle will encourage a horse to wait and jump up as opposed to rushing and jumping flat.

    For a horse that tends to get rushy, I always use ground poles. A take off and landing rail at 7ft on each side of a trot jump can do wonders.
    \"Don\'t go throwing effort after foolishness\" >>>Spur, Man From Snowy River



  6. #6
    short_stack Guest

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Czar View Post
    Definitely stirrups up a hole.

    You anticipated the jump in this video which will encourage the mare to want to rush the jump. Two strides out, you got a little busy with your seat and then went into your 2 point too early and too exaggerated for such a small jump causing your mare to leave too early as well.

    Over an "X" and especially with a horse that tends to rush, you barely need to give a release - staying more controlled in your hip angle will encourage a horse to wait and jump up as opposed to rushing and jumping flat.

    For a horse that tends to get rushy, I always use ground poles. A take off and landing rail at 7ft on each side of a trot jump can do wonders.
    While I do realize that I am exaggerating my two point, the horse doesn't lift her legs if I don't get my butt up and out of the saddle. Any suggestions how to fix this/do it differently?



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug. 11, 2000
    Location
    Chantilly,va.
    Posts
    10,902

    Thumbs up slowly slow

    Your release and upper body are very quick, this could be result of stirrups too long It's too dark to tell much ,more what did you have in mind? There is an old Zen saying, When you go slowly slow , you get fast, when you go quickly fast, you get slow!
    Last edited by Carol Ames; Jul. 4, 2009 at 06:15 PM. Reason: typo
    breeder of Mercury!

    remember to enjoy the moment, and take a moment to enjoy and give God the glory for these wonderful horses in our lives.BECAUSE: LIFE is What Happens While Making Other Plans



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug. 11, 2000
    Location
    Chantilly,va.
    Posts
    10,902

    Exclamation WALK!

    Try walking a fence; have someone on the ground to set fences for you; Walk up to it on loose rein; Sit ABSOLUTELY still until the horse is so close, there is no way to do anything other than "hop over it! have A person on the ground raise the fence gradually until you've reached her limit; You can do the same with trotting a fence, then add a second fence you can lope down to and just "step over" from a canter/ lope
    breeder of Mercury!

    remember to enjoy the moment, and take a moment to enjoy and give God the glory for these wonderful horses in our lives.BECAUSE: LIFE is What Happens While Making Other Plans



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan. 29, 2003
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    1,999

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by short_stack View Post
    While I do realize that I am exaggerating my two point, the horse doesn't lift her legs if I don't get my butt up and out of the saddle. Any suggestions how to fix this/do it differently?
    I'm not really sure what you mean? Will she clobber through the jump or just not jump well?
    \"Don\'t go throwing effort after foolishness\" >>>Spur, Man From Snowy River



  10. #10
    short_stack Guest

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Czar View Post
    I'm not really sure what you mean? Will she clobber through the jump or just not jump well?
    She will run through the jump according to her owner. I haven't experienced this, but my trainer did tell me that she drags her feet. I encountered this once while I was jumping her over a "brick wall" type vertical. She hit the jump with both her front AND back feet!



  11. #11
    short_stack Guest

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Carol Ames View Post
    Try walking a fence; have someone on the ground to set fences for you; Walk up to it on loose rein; Sit ABSOLUTELY still until the horse is so close, there is no way to do anything other than "hop over it! have A person on the ground raise the fence gradually until you've reached her limit; You can do the same with trotting a fence, then add a second fence you can lope down to and just "step over" from a canter/ lope
    I tried walking and trotting ground poles today and after a few times around she was trotting them like second nature. I plan to ask my trainer to lay ground poles during my next lesson so that she doesn't rush/take a long spot while we jump. Thank you!



Similar Threads

  1. Video Critique Please :)
    By ponyjumper525 in forum Hunter/Jumper
    Replies: 24
    Last Post: Oct. 16, 2012, 10:28 AM
  2. Video Critique :)
    By PeanutPony8 in forum Hunter/Jumper
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: Apr. 27, 2012, 05:33 PM
  3. XC Video critique
    By riderboy in forum Eventing
    Replies: 38
    Last Post: Nov. 10, 2011, 01:38 AM
  4. Replies: 22
    Last Post: Dec. 30, 2010, 11:45 PM
  5. video critique!-New Video Post #12!!!
    By neigh.neigh in forum Hunter/Jumper
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: May. 30, 2009, 01:53 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •