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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov. 1, 2005
    Location
    The Prairie
    Posts
    5,524

    Default Travelling, training etc for the pregnant young maiden

    Looking for the input of the more experienced here.

    I have three year old maiden that I am having bred this this year via frozen semen (assuming the fertility gods co-operate). Checked this a.m. no pregnancy.

    Vet think she might be breeding her again this week as she follicle looks promising. So I will give the frozen another shot. She has been sent to a repro farm for the purpose of breeding as I can't make myself available at home at all hours.

    The mare has led a very sheltered existence and up until going to the repro farm I was the only person that ever handled her. She has basically lived "down on the farm" so to speak. She took quite a while to settle at the farm; everything, and I mean everything, was brand new to her.

    I am told she has now settled well. Vet is hopeful she will conceive this cycle. If not, there is potential for plan B involving LC with another stallion.

    So, assuming you have a sheltered, wide eyed maiden that you really really want to hang onto the pregnancy would you

    a) take her to the inspection for her breed registry (which would be on August 6, about a three hour drive, longer than the mare has ever spent on a trailer and only her third trailer ride ever)
    b) send her to another farm for starting in the fall (intention was to have her lightly started, WTC both ways, etc...then winter off and get going again post-weaning as a four year old).

    I had planned to do both but now I'm feeling protective and getting cold feet at the thought of any risk of abortion.

    WWYD?
    Last edited by Mozart; Jun. 22, 2009 at 03:32 PM. Reason: clarification
    I love cooking with wine. Sometimes I even put it in the food.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun. 8, 2009
    Location
    Ontario
    Posts
    556

    Default

    I know everyone is going to have a different method as to what they do...but personally for my maiden mare I had her bred AI. I ended up moving to Texas (from Nova Scotia - Canada) when she was 9 months along. She was shipped down in an air ride trailer with 2 other maidens (who were 8 months) and they were all fine. (2 of the 3 were very sheltered as well...heck they were just halterbroke the summer prior!) Everyone delivered when they were suppose to with no issues!!

    As for the riding/training part of things...personally if the mare is in work before she is bred, I keep riding her as such...otherwise I will give them a minimum of 45 days (after the ultrasound) before I start them in work. Only then is it light, gradually working up to a more 'normal' routine. So far I have had no problems with it...but ultimatly you know your horse and how they will (or 'should') take things...

    Hopefully that made sense...and good luck with getting your mare in foal!! And for the trailer ride on the 6th of August, I personally would consider how 'good' the breeding went and just listen to your gut...she would be around 40+ days then so...tough call...could you get her inspected with a foal at foot the following year?



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov. 1, 2005
    Location
    The Prairie
    Posts
    5,524

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ElegantExpressionsFarm View Post
    she would be around 40+ days then so...tough call...could you get her inspected with a foal at foot the following year?
    Yes, she could get inspected next year with foal at foot. Pros and cons to that too I guess. I initially thought she would show better without a foal to worry about. However, I will have to present the foal anyway....

    I would feel better about it if she was futher along in her pregnancy (assuming she gets in foal next cycle..fingers crossed).
    I love cooking with wine. Sometimes I even put it in the food.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul. 5, 2002
    Location
    FL
    Posts
    8,368

    Default

    I would feel happier if she was over 60 days gestation for the inspection. How hot is it where you are? That is a factor.

    For the riding, I start mine lightly, breed them when they are settled and keep them in light work until they are inspected. I am not sure that I would risk a pregnancy to start one after it was bred. It would depend on the trainer, the weather and the filly.

    It is a tough call.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov. 1, 2005
    Location
    The Prairie
    Posts
    5,524

    Default

    Yes, I think if she was further along I would feel better about it. And I do think she would find the trip and the inspection rather stressful given that she found the transition to the breeding farm to be a Big Deal.

    It's not that she is unhandled, she has been handled daily, ties, cross ties, loads, has had ground work done etc but just by me on the same little farm, with her same little turnout group, where nothing exciting EVER happens and she has never gone anywhere.

    Now at the breeding farm there are tractors, traffic, equipment, different horses coming and going for breeding, foals, stallions doing live cover, different staff handling the horses, ultrasound exams..... It has been an experience for her.

    Heat wise..the weather can be either hot, sweltering, humid....or not...never know what you will get here!
    I love cooking with wine. Sometimes I even put it in the food.



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