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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan. 2, 2009
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    Default Senior food making horse "hot"?

    Hi, a little background, have been working a lot/and really busy and I accidently dumped the Senior food into my other horse's grain holding garbage can.(he gets Strategy). Lately, I have increased his workload by 2 extra days per week. He also has had some extra hours in the pasture. My question is; Is he getting fitter or is it the Senior or fresh grass? He has become a sort of terror under saddle. He wants to go go go and then some. Previously I had to push to keep him trotting! I do know the Senior has yucca in it, but it has the same percent 14%. Sorry so long, please advise.

    thanks,

    K and B
    Strange how much you've got to know Before you know how little you know. Anonymous



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug. 5, 2006
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    5,092

    Default

    Could be....What's in the feed?

    My senior becomes a holy terror on anything textured...doesn't matter if it is senior formulated or not. On pellets or extruded, he becomes a normal horse again.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr. 10, 2006
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    Default

    Senior feed typically has a lot of sugar in it. Then again I think Strategy does, as well.

    Blue Seal Vintage Senior is about 22% NSC I think, TC Senior closer to 11%, but all other brands of Senior are well over 25% NSC I believe.

    I'd try to cut back the sugar intake, especially since he's out on good grass too.
    We couldn't all be cowboys, so some of us are clowns.



  4. #4
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    Feb. 9, 2005
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    Upper Midwest
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    Default

    Triple Crown Senior was the feed that made my horse NOT be hot! lol.

    Totally depends on what you are feeding and how much.
    DIY Journey of Remodeling the Farmette: http://weownblackacre.blogspot.com/



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct. 19, 2005
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    7,320

    Default

    You bet - read here and from experience I know this does not only apply to young horses: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases...0815170625.htm



  6. #6
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    Apr. 17, 2008
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    879

    Default

    Triple Crown Senior made my (usually) very lazy warmblood super hot.



  7. #7
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    Feb. 5, 2002
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    Default

    My 27-y-o Arab has been renamed Power Pony since I increased his Senior feed significantly last year. I like him better this way than before, when he needed much kicking and a dressage whip to get a nice forward trot -- but I thought I'd retired him and now I have to ride him to get the edge off for the kids! I keep him on Purina Senior (and a bunch of other stuff) because he will reliably eat it and lick the pan after, and he needs every single calorie he can get.

    I used to be a non-believer in the idea that certain feeds make horses hot, but now I have a turbo-charged 27-year-old and the only thing that has changed is his feed.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug. 25, 2007
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    Default

    Any horse can be made "hot" by about any feed if you give them enough of it.

    Any horse can perform on about any feed if it's fed properly.

    Horses get "hot" because they're feed too much feed and/or they get a "high carbohydrate" feed. With a lot of the "senior" feeds you get a double whammy: high caloric density and lots of carbs. Guess what happens if you don't adjust the amount?

    I'd likely cut the daily ration back, maybe even mix it with his normal feed until you get back to the prior regime.

    A fit horse will have more "get up and go" than a "soft" one. He'll also go longer. Now might be a good time to review riding basics with the horse (whoa, changing gaits, gait regularity, etc.).

    G.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan. 2, 2009
    Location
    Michigan
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    Default

    thank you for the replies. Forgive my ignorance, but where do I find the NSC info on the feed label? I have the "air fern" thing going on with this gelding. Usually his grain ration is about a half pound per feeding(2X daily). He gets selenium and Glucosamine supplemented and no hay because of the current state of the pasture.

    thanks,

    K and B
    Strange how much you've got to know Before you know how little you know. Anonymous



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar. 24, 2008
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    1,835

    Default

    Usually NSC is not available on the feed tag unfortunately you have to get it from the manufacturer.

    I have found that horses do become spooky on Senior, and return to normal when taken off of it. All other things being equal.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul. 19, 2008
    Location
    SW Ohio
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    Default

    Here's a link from another forum about NSC's in some of the popular feeds:

    http://www.horseforum.com/horse-heal...-levels-14767/
    lindasp62
    Founder & Donor/Account Advisor
    Brennan Equine Welfare Fund
    http://www.brennanequinewelfarefund.com/index.html



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jul. 28, 2004
    Location
    Texas
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    Default

    It would be helpful if the original poster and the other posters referring to "senior" feed would tell us what kind of "senior" feed. Purina? TC? Something else? TC Senior is only about 10 or 11% NSC as another poster has said. I believe Purina is much higher.



  13. #13
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    Oct. 19, 2005
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    Do not rely on what the manufacturer tells you - rely on how your horse reacts to what you feed. I have seen and experienced several cases where horses reacted even though the feed was supposed to be safe and low NSC!



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Mar. 9, 2001
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    Default

    Agree with others that we need to know what brand of senior feed it is.

    If it's something like Triple Crown Senior, part of the change could be that you've gone to a higher quality feed and the horse is able to get more out of it.

    The same sort of thing sometimes happens when horses are first put on the EPSM diet--their bodies are finally getting the kind of fuel it can use so they feel good.



  15. #15
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    Jan. 2, 2009
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    Michigan
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    Default

    The Senior feed is Dynasty(Kent). One of the first ingredients on the label is; dehydrated Alfalfa meal, and corn. Probably not the best for a horse that doesn't need more energy.

    I am considering(and probably will) slowly move this gelding onto a "low" starch feed.

    Karen
    Strange how much you've got to know Before you know how little you know. Anonymous



  16. #16
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    Oct. 19, 2005
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    Default

    Yeah - corn can make horse hot quickly



  17. #17
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    Jun. 17, 2002
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    Default

    My horse (who is very quiet and lazy) definitely showed more energy while on Equine Senior. I imagine it's the sugar.



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